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  1. Peter de Marneffe (2014). Against the Legalization of Drugs. In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell. 346.
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  2. Peter de Marneffe (2014). Liberalism Without Perfection, by Jonathan Quong. Mind 123 (489):239-242.
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  3. Peter de Marneffe (2013). Contractualism, Personal Values, and Well-Being. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):51-68.
    Scanlon's distinction between well-being and other personal values cannot be made out clearly if well-being is understood, as it commonly is, to consist in whatever is intrinsically good for a person. Two other accounts of well-being, however, might be able to explain this distinction. One is a version of the rational care view proposed by Stephen Darwall; another is a rational sympathy view suggested by some of Brad Hooker's work.
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  4. Peter de Marneffe (2013). Sexual Freedom and Impersonal Value. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (3):495-512.
    Hart argues persuasively that majority disapproval cannot justify the government in prohibiting a form of sexual conduct, but he does not address the possibility that the intrinsic badness of a sex act might justify the government in prohibiting it. This article explains within a contractualist framework why the intrinsic badness of a sex act cannot justify the restriction of any important sexual freedom.
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  5. Peter de Marneffe (2013). Vice Laws and Self-Sovereignty. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):29-41.
    There is an important moral difference between laws that criminalize drugs and prostitution and laws that make them illegal in other ways: criminalization violates our moral rights in a way that nonlegalization does not. Criminalization is defined as follows. Drugs are criminalized when there are criminal penalties for using or possessing small quantities of drugs. Prostitution is criminalized when there are criminal penalties for selling sex. Legalization is defined as follows. Drugs are legalized when there are no criminal penalties for (...)
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  6. Peter de Marneffe (2009). Liberalism and Prostitution. OUP USA.
    Civil libertarians characterize prostitution as a "victimless crime," and argue that it ought to be legalized. Feminist critics counter that prostitution is not victimless, since it harms the people who do it. Civil libertarians respond that most women freely choose to do this work, and that it is paternalistic for the government to limit a person's liberty for her own good. In this book Peter de Marneffe argues that although most prostitution is voluntary, paternalistic prostitution laws in some form are (...)
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  7. Douglas Husak & Peter de Marneffe (2007). Reviewed by Kalle Grill, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Dept. Of Philosophy and the History of Technology, Stockholm. Theoria 73 (3):248-255.
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  8. Peter de Marneffe (2006). Avoiding Paternalism. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (1):68–94.
  9. Peter de Marneffe (2006). The Slipperiness of Neutrality. Social Theory and Practice 32 (1):17-34.
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  10. Peter de Marneffe (2004). Popular Sovereignty, Original Meaning, and Common Law Constitutionalism. Law and Philosophy 23 (3):223-260.
  11. Peter de Marneffe (2003). An Objection to Attitudinal Hedonism. Philosophical Studies 115 (2):197 - 200.
    This article argues that attitudinal hedonism is false as atheory of what is intrinsically good for us because it impliesthat nothing is intrinsically good for someone who does nothave the psychological capacity for the propositional attitudeof enjoyment even if he has other important mental capacitiesthat humans have.
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  12. Peter de Marneffe (2003). Against the Legalization of Heroin. Criminal Justice Ethics 22 (1):34-40.
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  13. Peter de Marneffe (2001). The Problem of Evil, the Social Contract, and the History of Ethics. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):11–25.
  14. Peter de Marneffe (1996). Do We Have a Right to Use Drugs? Public Affairs Quarterly 10 (3):229-247.
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  15. Peter de Marneffe (1994). Contractualism, Liberty, and Democracy. Ethics 104 (4):764-783.
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  16. Peter De Marneffe (1994). Popular Sovereignty and Thegriswold Problematic. Law and Philosophy 13 (1):97-112.
  17. Peter De Marneffe (1994). Rawls's Idea of Public Reason. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3-4):232-250.
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  18. Peter De Marneffe (1990). Liberalism, Liberty, and Neutrality. Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (3):253-274.
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