Search results for 'Peter Eldridge-Smith' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Peter Eldridge-Smith (Australian National University)
  1. Noel Carroll, Lester H. Hunt, Richard Eldridge, Carl Plantinga, Stephen Prickett, Benami Scharfstein, Terry Smith, Okwui Enwezor & Nancy Condee (2009). Halsall, Francis, Jansen, Julia & O'Connor, Tony. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):315.score: 1200.0
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  2. Peter Smith (2003). An Introduction to Formal Logic. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    Formal logic provides us with a powerful set of techniques for criticizing some arguments and showing others to be valid. These techniques are relevant to all of us with an interest in being skilful and accurate reasoners. In this highly accessible book, Peter Smith presents a guide to the fundamental aims and basic elements of formal logic. He introduces the reader to the languages of propositional and predicate logic, and then develops formal systems for evaluating arguments translated into these (...)
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  3. Peter Smith, Reading Notes on Logic Options –.score: 240.0
    LO : John L. Bell, David DeVidi and Graham Solomon, Logical Options, Broadview Press, 2001. ILF : Peter Smith, Introduction to Formal Logic, CUP 2003. LFP : Ted Sider, Logic for Philosophy, OUP forthcoming: draft available at http://tedsider.org/books/lfp/lfp.pdf.
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  4. Peter Smith (2013). An Introduction to Gödel's Theorems. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    In 1931, the young Kurt Gödel published his First Incompleteness Theorem, which tells us that, for any sufficiently rich theory of arithmetic, there are some arithmetical truths the theory cannot prove. This remarkable result is among the most intriguing (and most misunderstood) in logic. Gödel also outlined an equally significant Second Incompleteness Theorem. How are these Theorems established, and why do they matter? Peter Smith answers these questions by presenting an unusual variety of proofs for the First Theorem, showing (...)
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  5. Christopher J. Berry, Maria Pia Paganelli & Craig Smith (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Adam Smith. Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    Preface Introduction Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith: Outline of Life, Times, and Legacy Part One: Adam Smith: Heritage and Contemporaries 1: Nicholas Phillipson: Adam Smith: A Biographer's Reflections 2: Leonidas Montes: Newtonianism and Adam Smith 3: Dennis C. Rasmussen: Adam Smith and Rousseau: Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment 4: Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith and Early Modern Thought Part Two: Adam Smith on Language, Art and Culture 5: Catherine Labio: Adam Smith's Aesthetics 6: James Chandler: Adam Smith as Critic 7: Michael C. (...)
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  6. Peter Brown, Andrew Smith & Karin Alt (eds.) (2005). The Philosopher and Society in Late Antiquity: Essays in Honour of Peter Brown. Distributor in the U.S., David Brown Bk. Co..score: 210.0
  7. Craig Smith (2006). Adam Smith's Political Philosophy: The Invisible Hand and Spontaneous Order. Routledge.score: 150.0
    When Adam Smith published his celebrated writings on economics and moral philosophy he famously referred to the operation of an invisible hand. Adam Smith's Political Philosophy makes visible the invisible hand by examining its significance in Smith's political philosophy and relating it to similar concepts used by other philosophers, revealing a distinctive approach to social theory that stresses the significance of the unintended consequences of human action. This book introduces greater conceptual clarity to the discussion of the invisible hand and (...)
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  8. Vincent Michael Colapietro & John Edwin Smith (eds.) (1997). Reason, Experience, and God: John E. Smith in Dialogue. Fordham University Press.score: 150.0
    John E. Smith has contributed to contemporary philosophy in primarily four distinct capacities; first, as a philosopher of religion and God; second, as an indefatigable defender of philosophical reflection in its classical sense ( a sense inclusive of, but not limited to, metaphysics); third, as a participant in the reconstruction of experience and reason so boldly inaugurated by Hegel then redically transformed by the classical American pragmatists, and significantly augmented by such thinkers as Josiah Royce, william Earnest Hocking, and Alfred (...)
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  9. Barry Smith (ed.) (1982). Parts and Moments: Studies in Logic and Formal Ontology. Philosophia Verlag.score: 150.0
    A collection of material on Husserl's Logical Investigations, and specifically on Husserl's formal theory of parts, wholes and dependence and its influence in ontology, logic and psychology. Includes translations of classic works by Adolf Reinach and Eugenie Ginsberg, as well as original contributions by Wolfgang Künne, Kevin Mulligan, Gilbert Null, Barry Smith, Peter M. Simons, Roger A. Simons and Dallas Willard. Documents work on Husserl's ontology arising out of early meetings of the Seminar for Austro-German Philosophy.
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  10. Adam Smith (2002 (1759)). Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments (Ed. K. Haakonssen). Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    A new edition of Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments, an important text in the history of moral and political thought.
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  11. Adam Smith (1980). The Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence of Adam Smith: III: Essays on Philosophical Subjects: With Dugald Stewart's `Account of Adam Smith'. OUP Oxford.score: 150.0
    Enth.: Dugoald Stewart's account of Adam Smith / ed. by I. S. Ross.
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  12. Casper Bruun Jensen, Barbara Herrnstein Smith, G. E. R. Lloyd, Martin Holbraad, Andreas Roepstorff, Isabelle Stengers, Helen Verran, Steven D. Brown, Brit Ross Winthereik, Marilyn Strathern, Bruce Kapferer, Annemarie Mol, Morten Axel Pedersen, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Matei Candea, Debbora Battaglia & Roy Wagner (2011). Introduction: Contexts for a Comparative Relativism. Common Knowledge 17 (1):1-12.score: 150.0
    This introduction to the Common Knowledge symposium titled “Comparative Relativism” outlines a variety of intellectual contexts where placing the unlikely companion terms comparison and relativism in conjunction offers analytical purchase. If comparison, in the most general sense, involves the investigation of discrete contexts in order to elucidate their similarities and differences, then relativism, as a tendency, stance, or working method, usually involves the assumption that contexts exhibit, or may exhibit, radically different, incomparable, or incommensurable traits. Comparative studies are required to (...)
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  13. Adam Smith (1976). The Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence of Adam Smith: I: The Theory of Moral Sentiments (D.D. Raphael and A.L. Macfie (Eds.)). OUP Oxford.score: 150.0
    A scholarly edition of a work by Adam Smith. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
     
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  14. Kerr Benjamin & Godfrey-Smith Peter (2002). On Price's Equation and Average Fitness. Biology and Philosophy 17 (4).score: 140.0
     
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  15. Peter H. Schiller & Marilyn C. Smith (1966). Detection in Metacontrast. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (1):32.score: 140.0
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  16. Ángel Pinillos, Nick Smith, G. Shyam Nair, Cecilea Mun & Peter Marchetto (2011). Philosophy's New Challenge: Experiments and Intentional Action. Mind and Language 26 (1):115-139.score: 120.0
    Experimental philosophers have gathered impressive evidence for the surprising conclusion that philosophers' intuitions are out of step with those of the folk. As a result, many argue that philosophers' intuitions are unreliable. Focusing on the Knobe Effect, a leading finding of experimental philosophy, we defend traditional philosophy against this conclusion. Our key premise relies on experiments we conducted which indicate that judgments of the folk elicited under higher quality cognitive or epistemic conditions are more likely to resemble those of the (...)
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  17. Kevin Mulligan, Peter Simons & Barry Smith (1984). Truth-Makers. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (3):287 - 321.score: 120.0
    A realist theory of truth for a class of sentence holds that there are entities in virtue of which these sentences are true or false. We call such entities ‘truthmakers’ and contend that those for a wide range of sentences about the real world are moments (dependent particulars). Since moments are unfamiliar we provide a definition and a brief philosophical history, anchoring them in our ontology by showing that they are objects of perception. The core of our theory is the (...)
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  18. Kevin Mulligan, Peter Simons & Barry Smith (2006). What's Wrong with Contemporary Philosophy? Topoi 25 (1-2):63-67.score: 120.0
    Philosophy in the West divides into three parts: Analytic Philosophy (AP), Continental Philosophy (CP), and History of Philosophy (HP). But all three parts are in a bad way. AP is sceptical about the claim that philosophy can be a science, and hence is uninterested in the real world. CP is never pursued in a properly theoretical way, and its practice is tailor-made for particular political and ethical conclusions. HP is mostly developed on a regionalist basis: what is studied is determined (...)
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  19. Joel Smith & Peter Sullivan (eds.) (2011). Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism assesses the present state and contemporary relevance of this tradition.
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  20. Peter Smith (1998). Approximate Truth for Minimalists. Philosophical Papers 27 (2):119-128.score: 120.0
  21. Peter Smith, Formal Logic.score: 120.0
    ... and a reading knowledge of formal logical symbolism is essential too. (Philosophers often use bits of logical symbolism to clarify their arguments.) Because the artificial and simply formal languages of logic give us highly illuminating objects of comparison when we come thinking about how natural languages work. (Relevant to topics in ‘philosophical logic’ and the philosophy of language.) But mainly because it us the point of entry into the study of one of the major intellectual achievements by philosophers of (...)
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  22. Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.) (1996). Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    Theories of Theories of Mind brings together contributions by a distinguished international team of philosophers, psychologists, and primatologists, who between them address such questions as: what is it to understand the thoughts, feelings, and intentions of other people? How does such an understanding develop in the normal child? Why, unusually, does it fail to develop? And is any such mentalistic understanding shared by members of other species? The volume's four parts together offer a state of the art survey of the (...)
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  23. Peter Smith (1998). Approximate Truth and Dynamical Theories. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):253-277.score: 120.0
    Arguably, there is no substantial, general answer to the question of what makes for the approximate truth of theories. But in one class of cases, the issue seems simply resolved. A wide class of applied dynamical theories can be treated as two-component theories—one component specifying a certain kind of abstract geometrical structure, the other giving empirical application to this structure by claiming that it replicates, subject to arbitrary scaling for units etc., the geometric structure to be found in some real-world (...)
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  24. Peter Smith, Back to Basics: Revisiting the Incompleteness Theorems.score: 120.0
    Preface 1 The First Theorem revisited 1.1 Notational preliminaries 1.2 Definitional preliminaries 1.3 A general version of G¨ odel’s First Theorem 1.4 Giving the First Theorem bite 1.5 Generic G¨ odel sentences and arithmetic truth 1.6 Canonical and standard G¨ odel sentences 2 The Second Theorem revisited 2.1 Definitional preliminaries 2.2 Towards G¨ odel’s Second Theorem 2.3 A general version of G¨ odel’s Second Theorem 2.4 Giving the Second Theorem bite 2.5 Comparisons 2.6 Further results about provability predicates 2.7 Back (...)
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  25. Peter Smith, Field on Truth: How Complex is Too Complex?score: 120.0
    In a reading group, we’ve been working through the first three parts of Field’s Saving Truth from Paradox, by the end of which he has presented his core proposals. At this point, we’ve now rather lost the will to continue – for this is an astonishingly badly written book, which makes ridiculous demands on the patience of even a sympathetic reader. It so happened that it fell to me to introduce the last two chapters in Part III, Ch. 17 in (...)
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  26. Peter Smith, Godel Without (Too Many) Tears.score: 120.0
    odel’s Theorems (CUP, heavily corrected fourth printing 2009: henceforth IGT ). Surely that’s more than enough to be going on with? Ah, but there’s the snag. It is more than enough. In the writing, as is the way with these things, the book grew far beyond the scope of the lecture notes from which it started. And while I hope the result is still pretty accessible to someone prepared to put in the time and effort, there is – to be (...)
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  27. Peter Smith & O. R. Jones (1986). The Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    This is a straightforward, elementary textbook for beginning students of philosophy. The general aim is to provide a clear introduction to the main issues arising in the philosophy of mind. Part I discusses the Cartesian dualist view which many find initially appealing, and contains a careful examination of arguments for and against. Part II introduces the broadly functionalist type of physicalism which has Aristotelian roots. This approach is developed to yield accounts of perception, action, belief and desire, and the emerging (...)
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  28. Luca Incurvati & Peter Smith (2012). Review of P. Maddy, Defending the Axioms: On the Philosophical Foundations of Set Theory. [REVIEW] Mind 121 (481):195-200.score: 120.0
  29. Peter Smith, Laws of Nature.score: 120.0
    Where to begin? I’ll take three books from my shelves. First, now nearly forty years old, a little book of television lectures by the great physicist Richard Feynman, The Character of Physical Law. He talks about the laws of motion, the inverse square law of gravitation, conservation laws, symmetry principles and the various ways these all hang together. Feynman obviously takes it that it is a prime aim of science to discover such laws. But what are laws? He writes – (...)
     
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  30. Peter Smith (2011). Squeezing Arguments. Analysis 71 (1):22 - 30.score: 120.0
    Many of our concepts are introduced to us via, and seem only to be constrained by, roughand-ready explanations and some sample paradigm positive and negative applications. This happens even in informal logic and mathematics. Yet in some cases, the concepts in question – although only informally and vaguely characterized – in fact have, or appear to have, entirely determinate extensions. Here’s one familiar example. When we start learning computability theory, we are introduced to the idea of an algorithmically computable function (...)
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  31. Peter Smith, Tennenbaum's Theorem.score: 120.0
    We are going to prove a key theorem that tells us just a bit more about the structure of the non-standard countable models of first-order Peano Arithmetic; and then we will very briefly consider whether any broadly philosophical morals can be drawn from the technical result.
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  32. Peter Smith, Basic Reading on Computable Functions.score: 120.0
    This is an annotated reading list on the beginning elements of the theory of computable functions. It is now structured so as to complement the first eight lectures of Thomas Forster’s Part III course in Lent 2011 (see the first four chapters of his evolving handouts).
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  33. Peter Smith, Introducing Wilfrid Hodges, a Shorter Model Theory.score: 120.0
    In the opening chapter of ‘the Shorter Hodges’, we get a lot of fixing of terminology and notation, and some fairly natural definitions of ideas like that of isomorphism between structures. There are no really tricky ideas which need further exploration, nor any nasty proofs that could do with more elaboration. So I don’t pretend to have anything very thrilling by way of introductory comments. But let me make some more general philosophical comments.
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  34. Peter Smith (1982). Bad News for Anomalous Monism? Analysis 42 (October):220-4.score: 120.0
  35. Chris Jarrold, Peter Carruthers, Jill Boucher & Peter K. Smith (1994). Pretend Play. Mind and Language 9 (4):445-468.score: 120.0
    Children’s ability to pretend, and the apparent lack of pretence in children with autism, have become important issues in current research on ‘theory of mind’, on the assumption that pretend play may be an early indicator of metarepresentational abilities.
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  36. Peter Smith, Wittgenstein on Mathematics and Games.score: 120.0
    Unlike his other major typescripts, the Big Typescript is divided into titled chapters, themselves divided into titled sections. But within a section we still get a collection of remarks typically without connecting tissue and lacking any transparently significant ordering or helpful signposting. So we still encounter the usual difficulties in trying to think our way through into what Wittgenstein might be wanting to say. Some enthusiasts like to try to persuade us that the aphoristic style is really of the essence. (...)
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  37. Peter Smith (1984). Anomalous Monism and Epiphenomenalism: A Reply to Honderich. Analysis 44 (2):83-86.score: 120.0
  38. Peter Smith, Curry's Paradox, Lukasiewicz, and Field.score: 120.0
    In approaching Ch. 4 of Saving Truth from Paradox, it might be helpful first to revisit Curry’s original paper, and to revisit Lukasiewicz too, to provide more of the scenesetting that Field doesn’t himself fill in. So in §1 I’ll say something about Curry, in §2 we’ll look at what Lukasiewicz was up to in his original three-valued logic, and in §3 we’ll look at the move from a three-valued to a many-valued Lukasiewicz logic. In §4, I move on to (...)
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  39. Peter Smith, Church's Thesis After 70 Years.score: 120.0
    In the section ‘Further reading’, I listed a book that arrived on my desk just as I was sending IGT off to the press, namely Church’s Thesis after 70 Years edited by Adam Olszewski et al. On the basis of a quick glance, I warned that the twenty two essays in the book did seem to be of ‘variable quality’. But actually, things turn out to be a bit worse than that: the collection really isn’t very good at all! After (...)
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  40. Peter Smith, Getting Published.score: 120.0
    Publish or perish? Well, like it or not (and I for one don't!--for I fear it encourages narrowness and scholasticism), having a track record of pieces accepted for publication is now more or less a sine qua non for getting a foot on the first rung of the profession, as a junior research fellow or temporary lecturer. And when it comes to applying for a permanent lectureship a good track record of publication and clear evidence that you are going to (...)
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  41. Peter Smith, Induction, More or Less.score: 120.0
    The first main topic of this paper is a weak second-order theory that sits between firstorder Peano Arithmetic PA1 and axiomatized second-order Peano Arithmetic PA2 – namely, that much-investigated theory known in the trade as ACA0. What I’m going to argue is that ACA0, in its standard form, lacks a cogent conceptual motivation. Now, that claim – when the wraps are off – will turn out to be rather less exciting than it sounds. It isn’t that all the work that (...)
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  42. Luca Incurvati & Peter Smith (2012). Is 'No' a Force-Indicator? Sometimes, Possibly. Analysis 72 (2):225-231.score: 120.0
    Some bilateralists have suggested that some of our negative answers to yes-or-no questions are cases of rejection. Mark Textor (2011. Is ‘no’ a force-indicator? No! Analysis 71: 448–56) has recently argued that this suggestion falls prey to a version of the Frege-Geach problem. This note reviews Textor's objection and shows why it fails. We conclude with some brief remarks concerning where we think that future attacks on bilateralism should be directed.
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  43. Peter Smith, The First Incompleteness Theorem.score: 120.0
    • How to construct a ‘canonical’ Gödel sentence • If PA is sound, it is negation imcomplete • Generalizing that result to sound p.r. axiomatized theories whose language extends LA • ω-incompleteness, ω-inconsistency • If PA is ω-consistent, it is negation imcomplete • Generalizing that result to ω-consistent p.r. axiomatized theories which extend Q..
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  44. Peter Smith, Developing a Writing Style.score: 120.0
    Like the other major journals, ANALYSIS can accept less than 10% of submissions. So standards are fierce. Many submissions are ruled out of court for being badly argued or for re-inventing the wheel or for being plain boring. But a fair proportion end up on the rejection pile simply because they are badly written. I saw far too much bad prose (to be sure, some of the prose that gets published is not exactly wonderful: I assure you that a lot (...)
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  45. Peter Smith (2009). Critical Notice of C. Parsons, Mathematical Thought and its Objects. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (3):549-557.score: 120.0
    Needless to say, Charles Parsons’s long awaited book1 is a must-read for anyone with an interest in the philosophy of mathematics. But as Parsons himself says, this has been a very long time in the writing. Its chapters extensively “draw on”, “incorporate material from”, “overlap considerably with”, or “are expanded versions of” papers published over the last twenty-five or so years. What we are reading is thus a multi-layered text with different passages added at different times. And this makes for (...)
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  46. Peter Smith & Jones O. R. (1986). The Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    This is a straightforward, elementary textbook for beginning students of philosophy. The general aim is to provide a clear introduction to the main issues arising in the philosophy of mind. Part I discusses the Cartesian dualist view which many find initially appealing, and contains a careful examination of arguments for and against. Part II introduces the broadly functionalist type of physicalism which has Aristotelian roots. This approach is developed to yield accounts of perception, action, belief and desire, and the emerging (...)
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  47. Peter Smith, Godel's Theorem: A Proof From the Book?score: 120.0
    Here’s one version G¨ odel’s 1931 First Incompleteness Theorem: If T is a nice, sound theory of arithmetic, then it is incomplete, i.e. there are arithmetical sentences ϕ such that T proves neither ϕ nor ¬ϕ. There are three things here to explain straight away.
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  48. Luca Incurvati & Peter Smith (2010). Rejection and Valuations. Analysis 70 (1):3 - 10.score: 120.0
    Timothy Smiley's wonderful paper 'Rejection' (Analysis 1996) is still perhaps not as well known or well understood as it should be. This note first gives a quick presentation of themes from that paper, though done in our own way, and then considers a putative line of objection - recently advanced by Julien Murzi and Ole Hjortland (Analysis 2009) - to one of Smiley's key claims. Along the way, we consider the prospects for an intuitionistic approach to some of the issues (...)
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  49. Peter Smith, First-Order Peano Arithmetic.score: 120.0
    Theorem 1. If T is a sound formalized theory whose language contains the language of basic arithmetic, then there will be a true sentence GT of basic arithmetic such that T ￿ GT and ￿ ¬GT, so T must be negation incomplete.
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  50. Peter Smith, Induction and Predicativity.score: 120.0
    I am interested in the philosophical prospects of what is called ‘predicativism given the natural numbers’. And today, in particular, I want to critically discuss one argument that has been offered to suggest that this kind of predicativism can’t have a stable philosophical motivation. Actually you don’t really need to know about predicativism to find some stand-alone interest in the theme I will be discussing. But still, it’s worth putting things into context. So I’m going to start by spending a (...)
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