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Peter F. Dominey [12]Peter Ford Dominey [6]
  1. Peter Ford Dominey (forthcoming). A Hippocampal Indexing Model of Memory Retrieval Based on State Trajectory Reconstruction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36:27-28.
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  2. Peter Ford Dominey (forthcoming). The Tip of the Language Iceberg. Language and Cognition.
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  3. Peter Ford Dominey (2013). Reciprocity Between Second-Person Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):418-419.
    As there is in the neuroscience of individuals engaged in dynamic interactions, similar dark matter is present in the domain of interaction between humans and cognitive robots. Progress in second-person neuroscience will contribute to the development of robotic cognitive systems, and such developed robotic systems will be used to test the validity of the underlying theories.
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  4. Peter Ford Dominey (2013). Recurrent Temporal Networks and Language Acquisition—From Corticostriatal Neurophysiology to Reservoir Computing. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    One of the most paradoxical aspects of human language is that it is so unlike any other form of behavior in the animal world, yet at the same time, it has developed in a species that is not far removed from ancestral species that do not possess language. While aspects of non-human primate and avian interaction clearly constitute communication, this communication appears distinct from the rich, combinatorial and abstract quality of human language. So how does the human primate brain allow (...)
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  5. Anne-Lise Jouen, Willem B. Verwey, Jurjen Van Der Helden, Christian Scheiber, Remi Neveu, Peter Ford Dominey & Jocelyne Ventre-Dominey (2013). Discrete Sequence Production With and Without a Pause: The Role of Cortex, Basal Ganglia and Cerebellum. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
    Our sensorimotor experience unfolds in sequences over time. We hypothesize that the processing of movement sequences with and without a temporal pause will recruit distinct but cooperating neural processes, including cortico-striatal and cortico-cerebellar networks. We thus compare neural activity during sequence learning in the presence and absence of this pause. Young volunteer participants learned sensorimotor sequences using the discrete sequence production (DSP) task, with Pause, No-Pause and Control sequences of four elements in an event related fMRI protocol. The No-Pause and (...)
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  6. Peter F. Dominey (2005). Aspects of Descriptive, Referential, and Information Structure in Phrasal Semantics: A Construction-Based Model. Interaction Studies 6 (2):287-310.
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  7. Peter F. Dominey (2005). Toward a Construction-Based Account of Shared Intentions in Social Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):696-696.
    This commentary analyzes the target article to determine whether shared-intention development could be implemented and tested in robotic systems. The analysis indicates that such an implementation should be feasible and will likely rely on a construction-based approach similar to that employed in the construction grammar framework.
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  8. Peter F. Dominey (2005). The Discontinuity Between Rules and Similarity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):22-23.
    In arguing for a rules-similarity continuum, Pothos should demonstrate that a single process or mechanism (a neural network model, for example) can handle the entire continuum. Pothos deliberately avoids this exercise as beyond the scope of the current research. In this context, I will present simulation, neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and experimental psychological results, arguing against the continuity hypothesis.
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  9. Peter F. Dominey (2004). Situation Alignment and Routinization in Language Acquisition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):195-195.
    Pickering & Garrod (P&G) describe a mechanism by which the situation models of dialog participants become progressively aligned via priming at different levels. This commentary attempts to characterize how alignment and routinization can be extended into the language acquisition domain by establishing links between alignment and joint attention, and between routinization and grammatical construction learning.
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  10. Peter F. Dominey (2003). Representational Limitations of the One-Place Predicate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):291-292.
    In the context of Hurford's claim that “some feature of language structure maps onto a feature of primitive mental representations,” I will argue that Hurford's focus on 1-place predicates as the basis of the “mental representations of situations in the world” is problematic, particularly with respect to spatiotemporal events. A solution is proposed.
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  11. Peter F. Dominey (2003). Structure and Function in Sequence Learning Evidence From Experimental, Neuropsychological. In Luis Jimenez (ed.), Attention and Implicit Learning. John Benjamins. 48--143.
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  12. Peter Ford Dominey (2003). A Conceptuocentric Shift in the Characterization of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):674-675.
    Recognizing limitations of the “syntactocentric” perspective, Jackendoff proposes a model in which phonology, syntax, and conceptual systems are each independently combinatorial. We can ask, however, whether he has taken this issue to its logical conclusion. The fundamental question that is not fully addressed is whether the combinatorial aspect of syntax originated in, and derives from, the indeed “far richer” conceptual system, a question to be discussed.
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  13. Peter F. Dominey (2002). Cross-Domain Thinking: Common Representation Format or Generalized Mapping Process? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):683-684.
    In Carruthers’ formulation, cross-domain thinking requires translation of domain specific data into a common format, and linguistic LF thus plays the role of the common medium of exchange. Alternatively, I propose a process-oriented characterization, in which there is no common representation and cross-domain thinking is rather the process of establishing mappings across domains, as in the process of analogical reasoning.
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  14. Peter F. Dominey (2000). A Moveable Feast. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):537-538.
    Neural organization achieves its stated goal to “show how theory and experiment can supplement each other in an integrated, evolving account of structure, function, and dynamics” (p. ix), showing in a variety of contexts – from olfactory processing to spatial navigation, motor learning and more – how function may be realized in the neural tissue, with explanatory and predictive neural network models providing a cornerstone in this approach.
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  15. Peter F. Dominey & Taïssia Lelekov (2000). Nonlinguistic Transformation Processing in Agrammatic Aphasia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):30-30.
    Grodzinsky's characterization of the syntactic function of Broca's area is convincing, but his argument that this transformation processing capability is specific to language is less so. Based on predictions from simulation studies of sequence learning, we report a correlation between agrammatic patients' impairments in (a) syntactic comprehension, and (b) nonlinguistic sequence transformation processing, indicating the existence of a nonlinguistic correlate of agrammatic aphasia.
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  16. Peter F. Dominey (1998). Flexible Categorization Requires the Creation of Relational Features. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):23-24.
    Flexible categorization clearly requires an adaptive component, but at what level of representation? We have investigated categorization in sequence learning that requires the extraction of abstract rules, but no modification of sensory primitives. This motivates the need to make explicit the distinction between sensory-level “atomic” features as opposed to concept-level “abstract” features, and the proposal that flexible categorization probably relies on learning at the abstract feature level.
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  17. Peter F. Dominey (1997). From Double-Step and Colliding Saccades to Pointing in Abstract Space: Toward a Basis for Analogical Transfer. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):745-745.
    Deictic pointers allow the nervous system to exploit information in a frame that is centered on the object of interest. This processing may take place in visual or haptic space, but the information processing advantages of deictic pointing can also be applied in abstract spaces, providing the basis for analogical transfer. Simulation and behavioral results illustrating this progression from embodiment to abstraction are discussed.
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  18. Peter F. Dominey (1997). Reducing Problem Complexity by Analogical Transfer. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):71-72.
    Analogical transfer in sequence learning is presented as an example of how the type-2 problem of learning an unbounded number of isomorphic sequences is reduced to the type-1 problem of learning a small finite set of sequences. The commentary illustrates how the difficult problem of appropriate analogical filter creation and selection is addressed while avoiding the trap of strong nativism, and it provides theoretical and experimental evidence for the existence of dissociable mechanisms for type-1 learning and type-2 recoding.
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