Search results for 'Peter H. Feinberg' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John S. Feinberg (2006). No One Like Him: The Doctrine of God. Crossway Books.score: 300.0
    This book contains some rare combinations: first, an author who is as concerned with conceptual clarification as he is with the absolute truthfulness of the biblical text; second, an argument that avoids the common "either-ors" and contends for the importance of both divine sovereignty and divine solicitude in equal measure; third, an approach that espouses divine determinism and divine temporality. No One Like Him takes on the most intractable intellectual challenges of contemporary evangelical theology. Kevin Vanhoozer , Research Professor of (...)
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  2. W. N. Kellogg, James Deese, N. H. Pronko & M. Feinberg (1947). An Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):99.score: 280.0
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  3. David J. Feith, Seth Andrew, Charles F. Bahmueller, Mark Bauerlein, John M. Bridgeland, Bruce Cole, Alan M. Dershowitz, Mike Feinberg, Senator Bob Graham, Chris Hand, Frederick M. Hess, Eugene Hickok, Michael Kazin, Senator Jon Kyl, Jay P. Lefkowitz, Peter Levine, Harry Lewis, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Secretary Rod Paige, Charles N. Quigley, Admiral Mike Ratliff, Glenn Harlan Reynolds, Jason Ross, Andrew J. Rotherham, John R. Thelin & Juan Williams (2011). Teaching America: The Case for Civic Education. R&L Education.score: 240.0
    This book taps the best American thinkers to answer the essential American question: How do we sustain our experiment in government of, by, and for the people?
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  4. Nicholas Appleton, Loren R. Bonneau, Walter Feinberg, Thomas D. Moore, Albert Grande, W. Eugene Hedley, D. Malcolm Leith, Charles R. Schindler, Leonard Fels, Harry Wagschal, Gregg Jackson, David C. Williams, Gary H. Gilliland, Colin Greer, Gerald L. Gutek, H. Warren Button & Ronald K. Goodenow (1974). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 5 (1-2):39-52.score: 240.0
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  5. Edwin H. Feinberg (1973). Foreign Journals. BioScience 23 (2):74-74.score: 240.0
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  6. Hilde Haider, Peter A. Frensch, Daniel Joram, Anna Abraham, Sabine Windmann, Irene Daum, Onur Güntürkün, Todd E. Feinberg, Julian Paul Keenan & John D. Eastwood (2005). Cristina Becchio, Cesare Bertone. The Ontology of Neglect. Consciousness and Cognition 14:426-427.score: 240.0
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  7. Peter Cane (2006). Taking Law Seriously: Starting Points of the Hart/Devlin Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 10 (1-2):21 - 51.score: 81.0
    The famous mid-20th century debate between Patrick Devlin and Herbert Hart about the relationship between law and morality addressed the limits of the criminal law in the context of a proposal by the Wolfenden Committee to decriminalize male homosexual activity in private. The original exchanges and subsequent contributions to the debate have been significantly constrained by the terms in which the debate was framed: a focus on criminal law in general and sexual offences in particular; a preoccupation with the so-called (...)
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  8. Michael E. Bratman (2006). What is the Accordion Effect? Journal of Ethics 10 (1-2):5 - 19.score: 72.0
    In "Action and Responsibility,'' Joel Feinberg pointed to an important idea to which he gave the label "the accordion effect.'' Feinberg's discussion of this idea is of interest on its own, but it is also of interest because of its interaction with his critique, in his "Causing Voluntary Actions,'' of a much discussed view of H. L. A. Hart and A. M. Honoré that Feinberg labels the "voluntary intervention principle.'' In this essay I reflect on what the (...)
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  9. Burleigh Wilkins (2006). Review Essay on the Roots of Evil. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 10 (1-2):193 - 199.score: 54.0
    I consider two essays by Joel Feinberg: his treatment of the moral obligation to obey the law, and his exploration of the evils of the Holocaust.
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  10. John Gardner (2008). Hart and Feinberg on Responsibility. In Matthew H. Kramer (ed.), The Legacy of H. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Forthcoming in Kramer et al (eds), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart. Posted 8 February 2008.
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  11. H. L. A. Hart, P. M. S. Hacker & Joseph Raz (eds.) (1977). Law, Morality, and Society: Essays in Honour of H. L. A. Hart. Clarendon Press.score: 42.0
    Hacker, P. M. S. Hart's philosophy of law.--Baker, G. P. Defeasibility and meaning.--Dworkin, R. M. No right answer?-Lucas, J. R. The phenomenon of law.--Honoré, A. M. Real laws.--Summers, R. S. Naïve instrumentalism and the law.--Marshall, G. Positivism, adjudication, and democracy.--Cross, R. The House of Lords and the rules of precedent.--Kenny, A. J. P. Intention and mens rea in murder.--Mackie, J. L. The grounds of responsibility.--MacCormick, D. N. Rights in legislation.--Raz, J. Promises and obligations.--Foot, P. R. Approval and disapproval.--Finnis, J. M. (...)
     
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  12. Peter J. Markie (1984). Feinberg on Moral Rights. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (3):237 – 245.score: 36.0
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  13. A. H. Lesser (1996). Jules Coleman and Allen Buchanan, Eds. In Harm's Way: Essays in Honor of Joel Feinberg. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13:118-119.score: 36.0
     
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  14. A. H. Lesser (1996). Jael Feinberg. Freedom and Fulfilment: Philosophical Essays. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13:118-118.score: 36.0
     
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  15. Robert Garland Colodny (1972). Paradigms & Paradoxes. [Pittsburgh]University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 24.0
    Some conceptual problems of quantum theory, by A. Fine.--Philosophical implications of contemporary particle physics, by G. Feinberg.--The physics of logic, by D. Finkelstein.--The nature of quantum mechanical reality: Einstein versus Bohr, by C. A. Hooker.--A formal approach to the philosophy of science, by B. C. Van Fraassen.--On the conceptual structure of quantum mechanics, by H. Stein.
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  16. Jonathan Witmer-Rich (2011). It's Good to Be Autonomous: Prospective Consent, Retrospective Consent, and the Foundation of Consent in the Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):377-398.score: 24.0
    What is the foundation of consent in the criminal law? Classically liberal commentators have offered at least three distinct theories. J.S. Mill contends we value consent because individuals are the best judges of their own interests. Joel Feinberg argues an individual’s consent matters because she has a right to autonomy based on her intrinsic sovereignty over her own life. Joseph Raz also focuses on autonomy, but argues that society values autonomy as a constituent element of individual well-being, which it (...)
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  17. John Forge (2002). Corporate Responsibility Revisited. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):13-32.score: 24.0
    The fact that corporate responsibility supervenes on human action implies that there are two possible kinds of account of the former, namely reductive accounts in which the responsibility of the corporation devolves down without remainder to its officers, and those in which it does not. Two versions of the latter are discussed here. The first, due to Peter French, tries to satisfy the supervenience requirement by defining corporate action in terms of human action. It is argued that the corresponding (...)
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  18. Peter Brian Barry, Evil Actions, Evildoers, and Evil People.score: 12.0
    Typically, philosophers interested in evil have typically been concerned with reconciling (or not) the apparent existence of gratuitous suffering with the existence of an omnipotent and omniscient and supremely loving and caring Deity. Undeniably, ‘evil’ functions as a mass noun: note the intelligibility of asking “Why is there so much evil in the world?” But ‘evil’ sometimes functions as an adjective and is used variously to describe persons, actions, desires, motives, and intentions; Joel Feinberg even speaks of “evil smells.” (...)
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  19. Steven M. Cahn & Peter J. Markie (eds.) (2009). Ethics: History, Theory, and, Contemporary Issues. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, Ethics: History, Theory, and Contemporary Issues, Third Edition, is organized into three parts, providing instructors with flexibility in designing and teaching a variety of courses in moral philosophy. The first part, Historical Sources, moves from classical thought (Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and Epictetus) through medieval views (Augustine and Aquinas) to modern theories (Hobbes, Butler, Hume, Kant, Bentham, and Mill), culminating with leading nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers (Nietzsche, James, Dewey, Camus, and Sartre). The second part, (...)
     
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