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Peter H. Schwartz [12]Peter Hammond Schwartz [2]
  1. Peter H. Schwartz (2012). Child Safety, Absolute Risk, and the Prevention Paradox. Hastings Center Report 42 (4):20-23.
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  2. Peter H. Schwartz (2012). Finding the Proper Place for Prevention: Review of Halley S. Faust and Paul T. Menzel,Eds.,Prevention Vs. Treatment: What's the Right Balance? [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):60-61.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 60-61, September 2012.
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  3. Peter H. Schwartz (2011). Decision Aids, Prevention, and the Ethics of Disclosure. Hastings Center Report 41 (2):30-39.
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  4. Peter H. Schwartz (2009). Disclosure and Rationality: Comparative Risk Information and Decision-Making About Prevention. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (3):199-213.
    With the growing focus on prevention in medicine, studies of how to describe risk have become increasing important. Recently, some researchers have argued against giving patients “comparative risk information,” such as data about whether their baseline risk of developing a particular disease is above or below average. The concern is that giving patients this information will interfere with their consideration of more relevant data, such as the specific chance of getting the disease (the “personal risk”), the risk reduction the treatment (...)
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  5. Peter H. Schwartz (2008). Risk and Disease. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (3):320-334.
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  6. Peter H. Schwartz (2007). Defining Dysfunction: Natural Selection, Design, and Drawing a Line. Philosophy of Science 74 (3):364-385.
    Accounts of the concepts of function and dysfunction have not adequately explained what factors determine the line between low‐normal function and dysfunction. I call the challenge of doing so the line‐drawing problem. Previous approaches emphasize facts involving the action of natural selection (Wakefield 1992a, 1999a, 1999b) or the statistical distribution of levels of functioning in the current population (Boorse 1977, 1997). I point out limitations of these two approaches and present a solution to the line‐drawing problem that builds on the (...)
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  7. Peter H. Schwartz (2007). Silence About Screening. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):46-48.
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  8. Peter H. Schwartz (2005). Defending the Distinction Between Treatment and Enhancement. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):17 – 19.
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  9. Peter H. Schwartz (2004). An Alternative to Conceptual Analysis in the Function Debate. The Monist 87 (1):136-153.
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  10. Peter H. Schwartz (2004). Moving Beyond Conceptual Analysis in the Function Debate. The Monist 87:136-153.
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  11. Peter H. Schwartz (2002). The Continuing Usefulness Account of Proper Function. In Andre Ariew, Robert Cummins & Mark Perlman (eds.), Functions: New Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology and Biology. Clarendon Press.
     
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  12. Peter H. Schwartz (1999). Proper Function and Recent Selection. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):222.
    "Modern History" versions of the etiological theory claim that in order for a trait X to have the proper function F, individuals with X must have been recently favored by natural selection for doing F (Godfrey-Smith 1994; Griffiths 1992, 1993). For many traits with prototypical proper functions, however, such recent selection may not have occurred: traits may have been maintained due to lack of variation or due to selection for other effects. I examine this flaw in Modern History accounts and (...)
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  13. Peter Hammond Schwartz (1990). Rejoinder to Springborg. Political Theory 18 (4):686-689.
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  14. Peter Hammond Schwartz (1989). "His Majesty the Baby": Narcissism and Royal Authority. Political Theory 17 (2):266-290.
    The child shall have things better than his parents: he shall not be subject to the necessities which they have recognized as dominating life. Illness, death, renunciation of enjoyment, restrictions on his own will, shall not touch him; the laws of nature, like those of society, are to be abrogated in his favor; he is really to be the center and heart of creation, “His Majesty the Baby,” as we once fancied ourselves to be.... At the weakest point of all (...)
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