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Peter Hanks [12]Peter W. Hanks [5]
  1. Peter Hanks, Questions.
    All too often when philosophers talk and write about sentences they have in mind only indicative sentences, that is, sentences that are true or false and that are normally used in the performance of assertions. When interrogative sentences are mentioned at all it is usually either in the form of a gesture toward some extension of the account of indicatives or an acknowledgment of the limitations of such an account. For example, in the final two sentences of his influential paper (...)
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  2. Peter Hanks (forthcoming). Transient Truths: An Essay in the Metaphysics of Propositions By Berit Brogaard. Analysis:anu047.
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  3. Peter Hanks (forthcoming). What Are the Primary Bearers of Truth? Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    What are the primary bearers of truth?. . ???aop.label???
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  4. Peter W. Hanks (2013). First-Person Propositions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):155-182.
    A first-person proposition is a proposition that only a single subject can assert or believe. When I assert ‘I am on fire’ I assert a first-person proposition that only I have access to, in the sense that no one else can assert or believe this proposition. This is in contrast to third-person propositions, which can be asserted or believed by anyone.
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  5. Peter W. Hanks (2012). Early Wittgenstein on Judgement. In Jl Zalabardo (ed.), Wittgenstein's Early Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 37.
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  6. Peter Hanks (2009). Recent Work on Propositions. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):469-486.
    Propositions, the abstract, truth-bearing contents of sentences and beliefs, continue to be the focus of healthy debates in philosophy of language and metaphysics. This article is a critical survey of work on propositions since the mid-90s, with an emphasis on newer work from the past decade. Topics to be covered include a substitution puzzle about propositional designators, two recent arguments against propositions, and two new theories about the nature of propositions.
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  7. Peter Hanks (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Recent Work on Propositions. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):889-892.
    Some of the most interesting recent work in philosophy of language and metaphysics is focused on questions about propositions, the abstract, truth-bearing contents of sentences and beliefs. The aim of this guide is to give instructors and students a road map for some significant work on propositions since the mid-1990s. This work falls roughly into two areas: challenges to the existence of propositions and theories about the nature and structure of propositions. The former includes both a widely discussed puzzle about (...)
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  8. Peter Hanks (2008). Conceiving of Pain. Dialogue 47 (2):351-376.
    ABSTRACT: In this article we aim to see how far one can get in defending the identity thesis without challenging the inference from conceivability to possibility. Our defence consists of a dilemma for the modal argument. Either "pain" is rigid or it is not. If it is not rigid, then a key premise of the modal argument can be rejected. If it is rigid, the most plausible semantic account treats "pain" as a natural-kind term that refers to its causaI or (...)
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  9. Peter W. Hanks (2008). A Dilemma About Necessity. Erkenntnis 68 (1):129 - 148.
    The problem of the source of necessity is the problem of explaining what makes necessary truths necessarily true. Simon Blackburn has presented a dilemma intended to show that any reductive, realist account of the source of necessity is bound to fail. Although Blackburn's dilemma faces serious problems, reflection on the form of explanations of necessities reveals that a revised dilemma succeeds in defeating any reductive account of the source of necessity. The lesson is that necessity is metaphysically primitive and irreducible.
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  10. Brendan O'Sullivan & Peter Hanks (2008). Conceiving of Pain. Dialogue 47 (02):351-.
    ABSTRACT: In this article we aim to see how far one can get in defending the identity thesis without challenging the inference from conceivability to possibility. Our defence consists of a dilemma for the modal argument. Either "pain" is rigid or it is not. If it is not rigid, then a key premise of the modal argument can be rejected. If it is rigid, the most plausible semantic account treats "pain" as a natural-kind term that refers to its causaI or (...)
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  11. Peter W. Hanks (2007). How Wittgenstein Defeated Russell's Multiple Relation Theory of Judgment. Synthese 154 (1):121 - 146.
    In 1913 Wittgenstein raised an objection to Russell’s multiple relation theory of judgment that eventually led Russell to abandon his theory. As he put it in the Tractatus, the objection was that “the correct explanation of the form of the proposition, ‘A makes the judgement p’, must show that it is impossible for a judgement to be a piece of nonsense. (Russell’s theory does not satisfy this requirement,” (5.5422). This objection has been widely interpreted to concern type restrictions on the (...)
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  12. Peter W. Hanks (2007). The Content–Force Distinction. Philosophical Studies 134 (2):141-64.
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  13. Peter Hanks (2006). Donald Davidson. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):245-246.
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  14. Peter Hanks (2006). Review of 'Reference Without Referents'. [REVIEW] Disputatio 1 (20):368 - 374.
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  15. Peter Hanks (2006). Reference Without Referents, by R. M. Sainsbury. Disputatio.
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  16. Peter Hanks (2006). Scott Soames's Beyond Rigidity: The Unfinished Semantic Agenda of Naming and Necessity. Noûs 40 (1):184–203.
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  17. Peter Hanks (2004). Review of David Hyder, The Mechanics of Meaning: Propositional Content and the Logical Space of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (4).
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