46 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Peter Duncan Harrison (University of Queensland)
  1. Peter Harrison (2011). Adam Smith, Natural Theology, and the Natural Sciences. In Paul Oslington (ed.), Adam Smith as Theologian. Routledge
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  21
    Peter Harrison (2016). The Modern Invention of “Science‐and‐Religion”: What Follows? Zygon 51 (3):742-757.
    I am grateful to the four reviewers of The Territories of Science and Religion for their careful and insightful readings of the book, and their kind words about it. They all got the central arguments pretty much right, and thus any critical comments are not the result of fundamental misunderstandings. While there are some common themes in the assessments, each reviewer, happily, has offered a distinct perspective on the book. For this reason I will deal with their comments in turn, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Peter Harrison (2010). A Scientific Buddhism? Zygon 45 (4):861-869.
    This essay endorses the argument of Donald Lopez's Buddhism and Science and shows how the general thesis of the book is consonant with other historical work on the “discovery” of Buddhism and on the emergence of Western conceptions of religion. It asks whether one of the key claims of Buddhism and Science—that Buddhism pays a price for its flirtation with the modern sciences—might be applicable to science-and-religion discussions more generally.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4.  19
    Peter Harrison (2011). Adam Smith and the History of the Invisible Hand. Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (1):29-49.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5.  12
    Peter Harrison (2016). Beliefs, Lebensformen, and Conceptual History. Metascience 25 (3):363-370.
    Book Symposium on The Territories of Science and Religion (University of Chicago Press, 2015). The author responds to review essays by John Heilbron, Stephen Gaukroger, and Yiftach Fehige.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    Peter Harrison (2011). Experimental Religion and Experimental Science in Early Modern England. Intellectual History Review 21 (4):413-433.
  7.  93
    Peter Harrison (1992). Descartes on Animals. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):219-227.
    Did Descartes deny that animals can feel? While it has generally been assumed that he did, there has been some confusion over the fact that Descartes concedes to animals both sensations and passions'. John Cottingham, for example, has argued that while Descartes did insist that animals were automata, denying them thought and "self"-consciousness, none of these assertions entail the conclusion that animals do not feel. This paper examines both Cottingham's arguments and the relevant sections of Descartes' writings, concluding that Descartes (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  8.  12
    Peter Harrison (2012). Francis Bacon, Natural Philosophy, and the Cultivation of the Mind. Perspectives on Science 20 (2):139-158.
    This paper suggests that Bacon offers an Augustinian (rather than a purely Stoic) model of the “culture of the mind.” He applies this conception to natural philosophy in an original way, and his novel application is informed by two related theological concerns. First, the Fall narrative provides a connection between the cultivation of the mind and the cultivation of the earth, both of which are seen as restorative of an original condition. Second, the fruit of the cultivation of the mind (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  12
    Peter Harrison (ed.) (2010). The Cambridge Companion to Science and Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    Explores the historical relations between science and religion and discusses contemporary issues with perspectives from cosmology, evolutionary biology and bioethics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10. Peter Harrison (1992). 'Religion' and the Religions in the English Enlightenment. Religious Studies 28 (1):122-123.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  11.  17
    Peter Harrison (1995). Newtonian Science, Miracles, and the Laws of Nature. Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (4):531 - 553.
    Newton, along with a number of other seventeenth-century scientists, is frequently charged with having held an inconsistent view of nature and its operations, believing on the one hand in immutable laws of nature, and on the other in divine interventions into the natural order. In this paper I argue that Newton, William Whiston, and Samuel Clarke, came to understand miracles, not as violations of laws of nature, but rather as beneficent coincidences which were remarkable either because they were unusual, or (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  12.  23
    Peter Harrison (2001). Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:265-290.
    [Introduction]: Curiosity is now widely regarded, with some justification, as a vital ingredient of the inquiring mind and, more particularly, as a crucial virtue for the practitioner of the pure sciences. We have become accustomed to associate curiosity with innocence and, in its more mature manifestations, with the pursuit of truth for its own sake. It was not always so. The sentiments expressed in Sir John Davies's poem, published on the eve of the seventeenth century, paint a somewhat different picture. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  49
    Peter Harrison (1993). Animal Souls, Metempsychosis, and Theodicy in Seventeenth-Century English Thought. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):519-544.
  14.  30
    Craig Brandist, James G. Buickerood, James E. Crimmins, Jonathan Elukin, Matt Erlin, Matthew R. Goodrum, Paul Guyer, Leor Halevi, Neil Hargraves & Peter Harrison (2002). Andrews, Naomi J.:“La Mère Humanité”: Femininity in the Romantic Socialism of Pierre Leroux and the Abbé A.-L. Constant........... Boyle, Marjorie O'Rourke: Pure of Heart: From Ancient Rites to Renaissance Plato..................................... [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Ideas 63:745-746.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  35
    Peter Harrison (1999). Prophecy, Early Modern Apologetics, and Hume's Argument Against Miracles. Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (2):241 - 256.
    Hume’s "Of Miracles" concludes with the claim that prophecies, too, are miracles, and as such are susceptible to the same arguments which apply to miracles. However, both Hume and his commentators have overlooked the distinctive features of prophecy. Hume’s chief objection to miracles--that one is never justified in crediting second-hand testimony to miraculous events--does not necessarily apply to the argument from fulfilled prophecies as it was understood in the eighteenth century. Neither was prophecy necessarily thought to entail any breach of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  3
    Peter Harrison (2002). Voluntarism and Early Modern Science. History of Science 40 (1):63-89.
  17.  4
    Peter Harrison (2002). Original Sin and the Problem of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe. Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (2):239-259.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  31
    Peter Harrison (1989). Theodicy and Animal Pain. Philosophy 64 (247):79 - 92.
    The existence of evil is compatible with the existence of God, most theists would claim, because evil either results from the activities of free agents, or it contributes in some way toward their moral development. According to the ‘free-will defence’, evil and suffering are necessary consequences of free-will. Proponents of the ‘soul-making argument’—a theodicy with a different emphasis—argue that a universe which is imperfect will nurture a whole range of virtues in a way impossible either in a perfect world, or (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  2
    Peter Harrison (forthcoming). Beliefs, Lebensformen. Metascience:1-8.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  9
    Peter Harrison (1998). The Virtues of Animals in Seventeenth-Century Thought. Journal of the History of Ideas 59 (3):463-484.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  21.  52
    Peter Harrison (2001). Hume's Abject Failure: The Argument Against Miracles. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (4):592-594.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  47
    Peter Harrison (2009). Linnaeus as a Second Adam? Taxonomy and the Religious Vocation. Zygon 44 (4):879-893.
    Swedish naturalist Carl von Linné (1707–1778) became known during his lifetime as a "second Adam" because of his taxonomic endeavors. The significance of this epithet was that in Genesis Adam was reported to have named the beasts—an episode that was usually interpreted to mean that Adam possessed a scientific knowledge of nature and a perfect taxonomy. Linnaeus's soubriquet exemplifies the way in which the Genesis narratives of creation were used in the early modern period to give religious legitimacy to scientific (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  10
    Peter Harrison (2006). Science and Dissent. Minerva 44 (2):223-227.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  8
    Peter Harrison (2009). Voluntarism and the Origins of Modern Science: A Reply to John Henry. History of Science 47 (2):223-231.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  4
    Peter Harrison (1996). God and Animal Minds A Response to Lynch. Sophia 35 (2):67-78.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  7
    Peter Harrison, A Theory of Legislation From a Systems Perspective.
    In this thesis I outline a view of primary legislation from a systems perspective. I suggest that systems theory and, in particular, autopoietic theory, as modified by field theory, is a mechanism for understanding how society operates. The description of primary legislation that I outline differs markedly from any conventional definition in that I argue that primary legislation is not, and indeed cannot be, either a law or any of the euphemisms that are usually accorded to an enactment by a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  4
    Peter Harrison (1996). God and Animal Minds. Sophia 35 (2):67-78.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  4
    Peter Harrison (2002). Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:120-121.
    In recent years historians of science have come to an increasing appreciation of the role played by such moral and affective categories as “trust,” “wonder,” “pedantry,” and “self‐discipline” in the knowledge‐making enterprises of the early modern period. Barbara Benedict's book on curiosity is a most welcome contribution to the literature devoted to such topics. In a lively and entertaining work, Benedict sets out to “analyse literary representations of the way curious people, including scientists, authors, performers, and readers, were engaged in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  1
    Peter Harrison & Ian Hesketh (forthcoming). Introduction: Evolution and Historical Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  1
    Peter Harrison (forthcoming). What Was Historical About Natural History? Contingency and Explanation in the Science of Living Things. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  4
    Peter Harrison (2007). Historia's History. Metascience 16 (2):321-325.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  2
    Peter Harrison (1993). The Secularization of the European Mind in the 19th Century. History of European Ideas 17 (1):123-124.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  1
    Peter Harrison (2007). Philosophy and the Crisis of Religion. In James Hankins (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 234--249.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Peter Harrison (2002). Barbara M. Benedict.Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry. X + 321 Pp., Frontis., Illus., Index.Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2001. $45. [REVIEW] Isis 93 (1):120-121.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Peter Harrison (2001). Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England. Isis 92 (2):265-290.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Peter Harrison (2002). Kenneth James Howell.God’s Two Books: Copernican Cosmology and Biblical Interpretation in Early Modern Science. Viii + 360 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2001. $39.95. [REVIEW] Isis 93 (3):482-483.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Peter Harrison (2011). Margaret J. Osler.Reconfiguring the World: Nature, God, and Human Understanding From the Middle Ages to Early Modern Europe. X + 184 Pp., Illus., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. $25. [REVIEW] Isis 102 (4):749-750.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Peter Harrison (2013). Stephen Gaukroger.The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1680–1760. X + 505 Pp., Bibl., Index. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. $65. [REVIEW] Isis 104 (4):843-845.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Peter Harrison (2009). Steven Matthews.Theology and Science in the Thought of Francis Bacon. Ix + 150 Pp., Apps., Bibl., Index. Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate, 2008. £50. [REVIEW] Isis 100 (3):660-661.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Peter Harrison (2009). Theology and Science in the Thought of Francis Bacon. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 100:660-661.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Peter Harrison (2002). Two Books: Copernican Cosmology and Biblical Interpretation in Early Modern Science. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:482-483.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Peter Harrison (2010). The Cultural Authority of Natural History in Early Modern Europe. In Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. The University of Chicago Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Peter Harrison (2013). The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1680–1760. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 104:843-845.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Peter Harrison (1993). The Neo-Cartesian Revival: A Response. Between the Species 9 (2):5.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Peter Harrison (2014). „Wissenschaft“¹ und „Religion“: Das Konstruieren der Grenzen. In Christof Breitsameter & Christian Tapp (eds.), Theologie Und Naturwissenschaften. De Gruyter 39-68.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Daniel Müllensiefen, Peter Harrison, Francesco Caprini & Amy Fancourt (2015). Investigating the Importance of Self-Theories of Intelligence and Musicality for Students' Academic and Musical Achievement. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography