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  1. Peter J. Taylor (2012). A Gene-Free Formulation of Classical Quantitative Genetics Used to Examine Results and Interpretations Under Three Standard Assumptions. Acta Biotheoretica 60 (4):357-378.
    Quantitative genetics (QG) analyses variation in traits of humans, other animals, or plants in ways that take account of the genealogical relatedness of the individuals whose traits are observed. “Classical” QG, where the analysis of variation does not involve data on measurable genetic or environmental entities or factors, is reformulated in this article using models that are free of hypothetical, idealized versions of such factors, while still allowing for defined degrees of relatedness among kinds of individuals or “varieties.” The gene (...)
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  2. Peter J. Taylor (2009). Nothing Reliable About Genes or Environment: New Perspectives on Analysis of Similarity Among Relatives in Light of the Possibility of Underlying Heterogeneity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (3):210-220.
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  3. Peter J. Taylor (2008). The Under-Recognized Implications of Heterogeneity: Opportunities for Fresh Views on Scientific, Philosophical, and Social Debates About Heritability. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 30 (3/4):431 - 456.
    Despite a long history of debates about the heritability of human traits by researchers and other critical commentators, the possible heterogeneity of genetic and environmental factors that underlie patterns in observed traits has not been recognized as a significant conceptual and methodological issue. This article is structured to stimulate a wide range of readers to pursue diverse implications of underlying heterogeneity and of its absence from previous debates. Section 1, a condensed critique of previous conceptualizations and interpretations of heritability studies, (...)
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  4. Peter J. Taylor, Michael Hoyler & David M. Evans (2008). A Geohistorical Study of 'The Rise of Modern Science': Mapping Scientific Practice Through Urban Networks, 1500–1900. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (4):391-410.
    Using data on the ‘career’ paths of one thousand ‘leading scientists’ from 1450 to 1900, what is conventionally called the ‘rise of modern science’ is mapped as a changing geography of scientific practice in urban networks. Four distinctive networks of scientific practice are identified. A primate network centred on Padua and central and northern Italy in the sixteenth century expands across the Alps to become a polycentric network in the seventeenth century, which in turn dissipates into a weak polycentric network (...)
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  5. Peter J. Taylor (2007). The Unreliability of High Human Heritability Estimates and Small Shared Effects of Growing Up in the Same Family. Biological Theory 2 (4):387-397.
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  6. Peter J. Taylor (2005). Unruly Complexity: Ecology, Interpretation, Engagement. University of Chicago Press.
    Ambitiously identifying fresh issues in the study of complex systems, Peter J. Taylor, in a model of interdisciplinary exploration, makes these concerns accessible to scholars in the fields of ecology, environmental science, and science studies. Unruly Complexity explores concepts used to deal with complexity in three realms: ecology and socio-environmental change; the collective constitution of knowledge; and the interpretations of science as they influence subsequent research. For each realm Taylor shows that unruly complexity-situations that lack definite boundaries, where what (...)
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  7. Peter J. Taylor (2003). Review of Robert Figueroa, Sandra Harding (Eds.), Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophy of Science and Technology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (10).
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  8. Peter J. Taylor, Saul E. Halfon & Paul N. Edwards (1998). Edited Volumes-Changing Life. Genomes, Ecologies, Bodies, Commodities. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (3):382.
     
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  9. Peter J. Taylor (1997). “Appearances Notwithstanding, We Are All Doing Something Like Political Ecology”. Social Epistemology 11 (1):111 – 127.
  10. Peter J. Taylor (1995). Building on Construction: An Exploration of Heterogeneous Constructionism, Using an Analogy From Psychology and a Sketch From Socio-Economic Modeling. Perspectives on Science 3 (1):66-98.
     
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  11. Peter J. Taylor (1994). Shifting Frames: From Divided to Distributed Psychologies of Scientific Agents. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:304 - 310.
    I characterize and then complicate Solomon, Thagard and Goldman's framing of the issue of integrating cognitive and social factors in explaining science. I sketch a radically (...)different framing which distributes the mind beyond the brain, embodies it, and has that mind-body-person become, as s/he always is, an agent acting in a society. I also find problems in Solomon's construal of multivariate statistics, Thagard's analogies for multivariate analysis, and Goldman's faith in the capacity of the community of users of scientific method to home in on true beliefs. (shrink)
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  12. Peter J. Taylor & Ann S. Blum (1991). Ecosystem as Circuits: Diagrams and the Limits of Physical Analogies. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):275-294.
    Diagrams refer to the phenomena overtly represented, to analogous phenomena, and to previous pictures and their graphic conventions. The diagrams of ecologists Clarke, Hutchinson, and H.T. Odum reveal their search for physical analogies, building on the success of World War II science and the promise of cybernetics. H.T. Odum's energy circuit diagrams reveal also his aspirations for a universal and natural means of reducing complexity to guide the management of diverse ecological and social systems. Graphic conventions concerning framing and translation (...)
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  13. Peter J. Taylor & Ann S. Blum (1991). Pictorial Representation in Biology. Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):125-134.
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  14. Peter J. Taylor (1990). Mapping Ecologists' Ecologies of Knowledge. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:95 - 109.
    Ecologists grapple with complex, changing situations. Historians, sociologists and philosophers studying the construction of science likewise attempt to account for (or discount) a wide variety of influences making up the scientists' "ecologies of knowledge." This paper introduces a graphic methodology, mapping, designed to assist researchers at both levels-in science and in science studies-to work with the complexity of their material. By analyzing the implications and limitations of mapping, I aim to contribute to an ecological approach to the philosophy of science.
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  15. Peter J. Taylor (1989). Geography and the Global Perspective. In Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.), Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books. 303.
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  16. Peter J. Taylor (1989). The Error of Developmentalism in Human Geography. In Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.), Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books. 303--319.
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  17. Peter J. Taylor (1988). Technocratic Optimism, H. T. Odum, and the Partial Transformation of Ecological Metaphor After World War II. Journal of the History of Biology 21 (2):213 - 244.