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  1. Maarten Franssen, Peter Kroes, Pieter Vermaas & Thomas A. C. Reydon (eds.) (2013). Artefact Kinds: Ontology and the Human-Made World. Synthese Library.
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  2. Pieter E. Vermaas, Dingmar Eck & Peter Kroes (2013). The Conceptual Elusiveness of Engineering Functions. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (2):159-185.
    In this paper, we describe the conceptual elusiveness of the notion of function as used in engineering practice. We argue that it should be accepted as an ambiguous notion, and then review philosophical argumentations in which engineering functions occur in order to identify the consequences of this ambiguity. Function is a key notion in engineering, yet is used by engineers systematically in a variety of meanings. First, we demonstrate that this ambiguous use is rational for engineers by considering the role (...)
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  3. Maarten Franssen & Peter Kroes (2012). Sociotechnical Systems. In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  4. Peter Kroes (2012). Engineering Design. In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  5. Wybo Houkes, Peter Kroes, Anthonie Meijers & Pieter E. Vermaas (2011). Dual-Nature and Collectivist Frameworks for Technical Artefacts: A Constructive Comparison. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):198-205.
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  6. Philip J. Nickel, Maarten Franssen & Peter Kroes (2010). Can We Make Sense of the Notion of Trustworthy Technology? Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):429-444.
    In this paper we raise the question whether technological artifacts can properly speaking be trusted or said to be trustworthy. First, we set out some prevalent accounts of trust and trustworthiness and explain how they compare with the engineer’s notion of reliability. We distinguish between pure rational-choice accounts of trust, which do not differ in principle from mere judgments of reliability, and what we call “motivation-attributing” accounts of trust, which attribute specific motivations to trustworthy entities. Then we consider some examples (...)
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  7. Peter Kroes (2009). Technical Artifacts, Engineering Practice, and Emergence. In Ulrich Krohs & Peter Kroes (eds.), Functions in Biological and Artificial Worlds: Comparative Philosophical Perspectives. Mit Press.
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  8. Ulrich Krohs & Peter Kroes (eds.) (2009). Functions in Biological and Artificial Worlds: Comparative Philosophical Perspectives. Mit Press.
    This volume takes on both issues and examines the relationship between organisms and artifacts from the perspective of functionality.
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  9. Ulrich Krohs & Peter Kroes (2009). Philosophical Perspectives on Organismic and Artifactual Functions. In Ulrich Krohs & Peter Kroes (eds.), Functions in Biological and Artificial Worlds: Comparative Philosophical Perspectives. Mit Press.
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  10. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & Ted Cavanagh (2008). Diverse Designing: Sorting Out Function and Intention in Artifacts. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  11. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore, Daniela Cerqui & Kevin Warwick (2008). Re-Designing Humankind: The Rise of Cyborgs, a Desirable Goal? In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  12. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & Sd Noam Cook (2008). Design and Responsibility: The Interdependence of Natural, Artifactual, and Human Systems. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  13. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & J. Craig Hanks (2008). Cities, Aesthetics, and Human Community: Some Thoughts on the Limits of Design. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  14. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & Kristo Miettinen (2008). Design: Structure, Process, and Function: A Systems Methodology Perspective. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  15. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore, Kathryn A. Neeley & Heinz C. Luegenbiehl (2008). Beyond Inevitability: Emphasizing the Role of Intention and Ethical Responsibility in Engineering Design. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  16. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & Glenn Parsons (2008). Nature, Aesthetic Values, and Urban Design: Building the Natural City. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  17. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & Paul B. Thompson (2008). Alienability, Rivalry, and Exclusion Cost: Three Institutional Factors for Design. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  18. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & Rebecca Webber (2008). Expert Culture, Representation, and Public Choice: Architectural Renderings as the Editing of Reality. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  19. Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.) (2008). Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
    This volume provides the reader with an integrated overview of state-of-the-art research in philosophy and ethics of design in engineering and architecture.
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  20. Jesse Hughes, Peter Kroes & Sjoerd Zwart (2007). A Semantics for Means-End Relations. Synthese 158 (2):207 - 231.
    There has been considerable work on practical reasoning in artificial intelligence and also in philosophy. Typically, such reasoning includes premises regarding means–end relations. A clear semantics for such relations is needed in order to evaluate proposed syllogisms. In this paper, we provide a formal semantics for means–end relations, in particular for necessary and sufficient means–end relations. Our semantics includes a non-monotonic conditional operator, so that related practical reasoning is naturally defeasible. This work is primarily an exercise in conceptual analysis, aimed (...)
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  21. Peter Kroes (2006). Coherence of Structural and Functional Descriptions of Technical Artefacts. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (1):137-151.
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  22. Peter Kroes & Anthonie Meijers (2006). The Dual Nature of Technical Artefacts. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (1):1-4.
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  23. Peter Kroes (2003). Screwdriver Philosophy; Searle's Analysis of Technical Functions. Techné 6 (3):131-140.
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  24. Peter Kroes & Anthonie Meijers (2002). Reply to Critics. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 6 (2):110-116.
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  25. Peter Kroes (2001). Technical Functions as Dispositions. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 5 (3):105-115.
    The paper argues that in order to understand the nature of technological knowledge (i.e., knowledge of technical artefacts as distinct from knowledge of natural objects) it is necessary to develop an epistemology of technical functions. This epistemology has to address the problem of the meaning of the notion of function. In the dominant interpretations, functions are considered to be dispositions, comparable to physical dispositions such as fragility and solubility. It is argued that this conception of functions is principally flawed. With (...)
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  26. Peter Kroes & Anthonie Meijers (eds.) (2001). The Empirical Turn in the Philosophy of Technology. Jai.
    THERE'S NO TURN LIKE THE EMPIRICAL TURN Arie Rip Philosophers of technology now turn to the phenomena in order to learn from them - always, and unavoidably, ...
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  27. Peter Kroes (1998). Technological Explanations. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 3 (3):124-134.
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  28. Peter Kroes (1994). Science, Technology and Experiments; The Natural Versus the Artificial. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:431 - 440.
    Hacking has maintained that in experiments phenomena are created, not discovered, and that scientific entities are tools for doing. These claims undermine the distinction between the natural and the artificial: phenomena and scientific entities become artifacts. Hacking's view raises the question whether the distinction between the natural and the artificial has to be given up. The paper argues 1) that phenomena are created, but in a sense that does not undermine the distinction between the natural and the (...)
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  29. Peter Kroes (1990). Book Review:An Architectonic for Science Wolfgang Balzer, C. Ulises Moulines, Joseph D. Sneed. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 57 (2):349-.
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  30. Peter Kroes (1989). Structural Analogies Between Physical Systems. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (2):145-154.
    Structural analogies between physical laws have received considerable attention from philosospheres of science. This paper, however, focusses on structural analogies between physical systems; this type of analogy plays an important role in the physical and technological sciences. A formal, set-theoretic description of structural analogies between physical systems is presented, and it is shown that a structural analogy between systems does not require a structural analogy with regard to the laws involved, nor conversely.
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  31. Peter Kroes (1984). Objective Versus Minddependent Theories of Time Flow. Synthese 61 (3):423 - 446.
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  32. Peter Kroes (1983). The Clock Paradox, or How to Get Rid of Absolute Time. Philosophy of Science 50 (1):159-163.
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