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  1. Amy Kind & Peter Kung (eds.) (forthcoming). Knowledge Through Imagination. Oxford University Press.
     
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  2. Peter Kung, Peter Kung.
    I lay out the framework for my theory of sensory imagination in “Imagining as a guide to possibility.” Sensory imagining involves mental imagery , and crucially, in describing the content of imagining, I distinguish between qualitative content and assigned content. Qualitative content derives from the mental image itself; for visual imaginings, it is what is “pictured.” For example, visually imagine the Philadelphia Eagles defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers to win their first Super Bowl. You picture the greenness of the field and (...)
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  3. Peter Kung (2014). You Really Do Imagine It: Against Error Theories of Imagination. Noûs 48 (4):n/a-n/a.
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  4. Peter Kung (2012). Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):806-809.
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  5. Peter Kung (2011). On the Possibility of Skeptical Scenarios. European Journal of Philosophy 19 (3):387-407.
    Abstract: It is generally accepted that skeptical scenarios must be possible to raise legitimate skeptical doubt. I argue that if the possibility in question is supposed to be genuine metaphysical possibility, the skeptic's reasoning does not straightforwardly succeed. I first motivate the metaphysical possibility requirement on skeptical scenarios: it's a plausible position that several authors accept and that a family of prominent views—sensitivity, safety, relevant alternatives—are committed to. I argue that plausible constraints in modal epistemology show that justification for believing (...)
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  6. Peter Kung (2010). Imagining as a Guide to Possibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (3):620-663.
  7. Peter Kung (2010). On Having No Reason: Dogmatism and Bayesian Confirmation. Synthese 177 (1):1 - 17.
    Recently in epistemology a number of authors have mounted Bayesian objections to dogmatism. These objections depend on a Bayesian principle of evidential confirmation: Evidence E confirms hypothesis H just in case Pr(H|E) > Pr(H). I argue using Keynes' and Knight's distinction between risk and uncertainty that the Bayesian principle fails to accommodate the intuitive notion of having no reason to believe. Consider as an example an unfamiliar card game: at first, since you're unfamiliar with the game, you assign credences based (...)
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  8. Peter Kung & Masahiro Yamada (2010). A Neglected Way of Begging the Question. American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):287.
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  9. Peter Kung, Imaginability as a Guide to Possibility.
     
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  10. Peter Kung, Imaginability as a Guide to Possibility, Part II.
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  11. Peter Kung (2002). Imagination and Modal Epistemology. Dissertation, New York University
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