Search results for 'Peter L. Vallentyne' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Peter L. Vallentyne (2003). Partha Dasgupta, Human Well‐Being and the Natural Environment:Human Well‐Being and the Natural Environment. Ethics 113 (2):405-407.
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  2. Peter Vallentyne (1996). David Braybrooke, Bryson Brown, and Peter Schotch (with Two Chapters by Laura Byrne), Logic on the Track of Social Change Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (5):315-317.
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  3. Peter Vallentyne (1986). Gauthier on Rationality and Morality. Eidso 5 (1):79-95.
    David Gauthier's book represents the culmination of his work over the last twenty years on the theory of rational choice and on contractarian moral theory. It is the most important book on contractarianisni since Rawls‘ A Theory of Justice' and is mandatory reading for anyone specializing in contemporary moral theory. Gauthier does two distinct, although closely related, things in his book: (l) he defends a theory of rational choice, and (2) he defends a contractarian theory of morality. The two are (...)
     
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  4.  1
    Byrne Peter (2007). Chris L. Firestone and Stephen R. Palmquist (Eds) Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion (Bloomington and Indianapolis In: Indiana University Press, 2006). Pp. XXVI+ 270. $65.00 (Hbk); $25.95 (Pbk). Isbn 0253 21800 4. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 43 (3):364-367.
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  5.  2
    J. W. L. (1932). Peter Abailard. By J. G. Sikes, M.A., with a Preface by the Rev. A. Nairne, D.D. (Cambridge University Press. 1932. Pp. Xvii + 282. Price 12s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 7 (28):488-.
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  6. Copland David, Campbell Alana, Rawlings Alicia, McMahon Katie, Silburn Peter & Nathan Pradeep (2015). L-Dopa Improves Learning and Maintenance of New Nouns in Healthy Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  7. S. P. L. & Vivian de Sola Pinto (1934). Peter Sterry: Platonist and Puritan, 1613-1672. A Biographical and Critical Study with Passages Selected From His Writings. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 31 (14):386.
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  8. Rozsa Peter (1959). Review: R. L. Goodstein, Logic-Free Formalisations of Recursive Arithmetic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 24 (3):245-246.
     
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  9. Rózsa Péter (1954). Bereczki Ilona. Nem Elemi Rekurzív Függvény Létezése . Ungarisch, MIT Deutschem Auszug, Und Kurzem Russischem Auszug. Az Első Magyar Matematikai Kongresszus Közleményei 1950. Augusztus 27. - Szeptember 2 – Comptes Rendus du Premier Congrès des Mathématiciens Hongrois 27 Août - 2 Septembre 1950, Publié Avec le Soutien de l'Académie des Sciences de Hongrie Par la Société Mathémetique János Bolyai, Budapest 1952, S. 409–417. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 19 (4):298-299.
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  10. Rózsa Péter (1959). Goodstein R. L.. Logic-Free Formalisations of Recursive Arithmetic. Mathematica Scandinavica, Bd. 2 , S. 247–261. Journal of Symbolic Logic 24 (3):245-246.
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  11. Rózsa Péter (1955). Kalmár László. Az Eldöntesprobléma Visszavezetése Logikai Formulák Véges Halmazon Való Kielégithetőségének Kérdésére . Ungarisch MIT Russischem Auszug Und Englischem Auszug. Az Első Magyar Matematikai Kongresszus Közleményei 1950. Augusztus 27. - Szeptember 2. — Comptes Rendus du Premier Congrès des Mathématiciens Hongrois 27 Août - 2 Septembre 1950, Publié Avec le Soutien de l'Académie des Sciences de Hongrie Par la Société Mathématique János Bolyai, Budapest 1952, S. 163–190. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (1):72.
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  12. Rózsa Péter (1954). Mostowski A.. A Lemma Concerning Recursive Functions and its Applications. Bulletin de l'Académie Polonaise des Sciences, Classe III, Bd. 1 , S. 277–280. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 19 (4):299-300.
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  13.  31
    Luc Lauwers & Peter Vallentyne (2004). Infinite Utilitarianism: More is Always Better. Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):307-330.
    We address the question of how finitely additive moral value theories (such as utilitarianism) should rank worlds when there are an infinite number of locations of value (people, times, etc.). In the finite case, finitely additive theories satisfy both Weak Pareto and a strong anonymity condition. In the infinite case, however, these two conditions are incompatible, and thus a question arises as to which of these two conditions should be rejected. In a recent contribution, Hamkins and Montero (2000) have argued (...)
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  14.  39
    Peter Vallentyne (2004). Infinite Utilitarianism: More Is Always Better. Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):307-330.
    We address the question of how finitely additive moral value theories (such as utilitarianism) should rank worlds when there are an infinite number of locations of value (people, times, etc.). In a recent contribution, Hamkins and Montero have argued that Weak Pareto is implausible in the infinite case and defended alternative principles. We here defend Weak Pareto against their criticisms and argue against an isomorphism principle that they defend. Where locations are the same in both worlds but have no natural (...)
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  15.  28
    Peter Vallentyne (1988). Gimmicky Representations of Moral Theories. Metaphilosophy 19 (3-4):253-263.
    The teleological/deontological distinction is generally considered to be the fundamental classificatory distinction for ethics. I have argued elsewhere (Vallentyne forthcoming (a), and Ch.2 of Vallentyne 1984) that the distinction is ill understood and not as important as is generally supposed. Some authors have advocated a moral radical thesis. Oldenquist (1966) and Piper (1982) have both argued that the purported distinction is a pseudo distinction in that any theory can be represented both as teleological and as deontological. Smart (1973, (...)
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  16. Peter Vallentyne (2011). Nozick’s Libertarian Theory of Justice. In Ralf Bader & John Meadowcroft (eds.), Anarchy, State, and Utopia--A Reappraisal. Cambridge University Press
  17. Peter Vallentyne (2007). Consequentialism. In Hugh La Follette (ed.), Ethics in Practice 3rd edition. Blackwell Publishers
    Ethics in Practice, 3rd edition, edited by Hugh La Follette (Blackwell Publishers, forthcoming 2007).
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  18. Peter Vallentyne (2008). Brute Luck and Responsibility. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (1):57-80.
    The concept of agent-responsibility for an outcome (that is, of the outcome reflecting the autonomous choice of the agent) is central to both ethics and political philosophy. The concept, however, remains radically under-explored. In particular, the issue of partial responsibility for an outcome needs further development. I propose an account of partial responsibility based on partial causal contribution. Agents who choose autonomously in full knowledge of the consequences are agent-responsible, I claim, for the shift in the objective probability of the (...)
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  19. Peter Vallentyne (2002). Equality, Brute Luck, and Initial Opportunities. Ethics 112:529-557.
    In the old days, material egalitarians tended to favor equality of outcome advantage, on some suitable conception of advantage (happiness, resources, etc.). Under the influence of Dworkin’s seminal articles on equality[i], contemporary material egalitarians have tended to favor equality of brute luck advantage—on the grounds that this permits people to be held appropriately accountable for the benefits and burdens of their choices. I shall argue, however, that a plausible conception of egalitarian justice requires neither that brute luck advantage always be (...)
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  20. Peter Vallentyne (2007). Distributive Justice. In Robert Goodin, Philip Pettit & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers
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  21. Peter Vallentyne (2011). Responsibility and False Beliefs. In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemploska (eds.), Justice and Responsibility. Oxford University Press
    An individual is agent-responsible for an outcome just in case it flows from her autonomous agency in the right kind of way. The topic of agent-responsibility is important because most people believe that agents should be held morally accountable (e.g., liable to punishment or having an obligation to compensate victims) for outcomes for which they are agent-responsible and because many other people (e.g., brute luck egalitarians) hold that agents should not be held accountable for outcomes for which they are not (...)
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  22.  88
    Peter Vallentyne (2002). Brute Luck, Option Luck, and Equality of Initial Opportunities. Ethics 112 (3):529-557.
  23. Peter Vallentyne & Shelly Kagan (1997). Infinite Value and Finitely Additive Value Theory. Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):5-26.
    000000001. Introduction Call a theory of the good—be it moral or prudential—aggregative just in case (1) it recognizes local (or location-relative) goodness, and (2) the goodness of states of affairs is based on some aggregation of local goodness. The locations for local goodness might be points or regions in time, space, or space-time; or they might be people, or states of nature.1 Any method of aggregation is allowed: totaling, averaging, measuring the equality of the distribution, measuring the minimum, etc.. Call (...)
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  24. Peter Vallentyne (2009). Left-Libertarianism and Liberty. In Thomas Christiano & John Christman (eds.), Debates in Political Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers 17--137.
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  25. Peter Vallentyne (2003). Brute Luck Equality and Desert. In Sabrina Olsaretti (ed.), Desert and Justice. Clarendon Press
    In recent years, interest in desert-based theories of justice has increased, and this seems to represent a challenge to equality-based theories of justice.[i] The best distribution of outcomeadvantage with respect to desert, after all, need not be the most equal distribution of outcomeadvantage. Some individuals may deserve more than others. Outcome egalitarianism is, however, implausible, and so the conflict of outcome desert with outcome equality is of little significance.[ii] Most contemporary versions of egalitarianism are concerned with neutralizing the differential effects (...)
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  26. Peter Vallentyne (2012). Taxation, Redistribution and Property Rights. In Andrei Marmor (ed.), Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge
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  27. Peter Vallentyne (2011). Libertarianism and the Rejection of a Basic Income. Basic Income Studies 6:1-12.
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  28. Peter Vallentyne (2011). Equal Negative Liberty and Welfare Rights. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):237-41.
    In Are Equal Liberty and Equality Compatible?, Jan Narveson and James Sterba insightfully debate whether a right to maximum equal negative liberty requires, or at least is compatible with, a right to welfare. Narveson argues that the two rights are incompatible, whereas Sterba argues that the rights are compatible and indeed that the right to maximum equal negative liberty requires a right to welfare. I argue that Sterba is correct that the two rights are conceptually compatible and that Narveson is (...)
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  29.  87
    Peter Vallentyne (1997). Intrinsic Properties Defined. Philosophical Studies 88 (2): 209-219.
    Intuitively, a property is intrinsic just in case a thing’s having it (at a time) depends only on what that thing is like (at that time), and not on what any wholly distinct contingent object (or wholly distinct time) is like. A property is extrinsic just in case it is non-intrinsic. Redness and squareness are intrinsic properties. Being next to a red object is extrinsic.
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  30. Peter Vallentyne (2003). Justice in General: An Introduction. In Equality and Justice: Justice in General. Routledge
    This is the first volume of Equality and Justice, a six-volume collection of the most important articles of the twentieth century on the topic of justice and equality. This volume addresses the following three (only loosely related) issues: (1) What is the concept of justice? (2) Is justice primarily a demand on individuals or on societies? (3) What are the relative merits of conceptions of justice based on equality, based on priority for those who have less, and based on ensuring (...)
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  31. Peter Vallentyne (1988). Explicating Lawhood. Philosophy of Science 55 (4):598-613.
    D. M. Armstrong, Michael Tooley, and Fred Dretske have recently proposed a new realist account of laws of nature, according to which laws of nature are objective relations between universals. After criticizing this account, I develop an alternative realist account, according to which (1) the nomic structure of a world is a relation between initial world-histories and world-histories, and (2) a law of nature is a fact that holds solely in virtue of nomic structure (and not, for example, in virtue (...)
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  32. Peter Vallentyne, Hillel Steiner & And Michael Otsuka (2005). Why Left-Libertarianism is Not Incoherent, Indeterminate, or Irrelevant: A Reply to Fried. Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (2):201–215.
    Over the past few decades, there has been increasing interest in left-libertarianism, which holds (roughly) that agents fully own themselves and that natural resources (land, minerals, air, etc.) belong to everyone in some egalitarian sense. Left-libertarianism agrees with the more familiar right-libertarianism about self-ownership, but radically disagrees with it about the power to acquire ownership of natural resources. Merely being the first person to claim, discover, or mix labor with an unappropriated natural resource does not—left-libertarianism insists—generate a full private property (...)
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  33. Peter Vallentyne & Hillel Steiner (2009). Libertarian Theories of Intergenerational Justice. In Axel Gosseries & Lukas Meyer (eds.), Justice Between Generations. Oxford University Press
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  34. Peter Vallentyne (2006). Against Maximizing Act-Consequentialism (June 30, 2008). In James Dreier (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Moral Theories. Blackwell Publishers 6--21.
    Maximizing act consequentialism holds that actions are morally permissible if and only if they maximize the value of consequences—if and only if, that is, no alternative action in the given choice situation has more valuable consequences.[i] It is subject to two main objections. One is that it fails to recognize that morality imposes certain constraints on how we may promote value. Maximizing act consequentialism fails to recognize, I shall argue, that the ends do not always justify the means. Actions with (...)
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  35. Peter Vallentyne (1992). Moral Dilemmas and Comparative Conceptions of Morality. Southern Journal of Philosophy (1):117-124.
    In recent years the problem of moral dilemmas has received the attention of a number of philosophers. Some authors[i] argue that moral dilemmas are not conceptually possible because they are ruled out by certain valid principles of deontic logic. Other authors[ii] insist that moral dilemmas are conceptually possible, and argue that therefore the principles of deontic logic that rule them out must be rejected.
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  36. Peter Vallentyne (2007). Libertarianism and the State. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):187-205.
    Although Robert Nozick has argued that libertarianism is compatible with the justice of a minimal state—even if does not arise from mutual consent—few have been persuaded. I will outline a different way of establishing that a non-consensual libertarian state can be just. I will show that a state can—with a few important qualifications—justly enforce the rights of citizens, extract payments to cover the costs of such enforcement, redistribute resources to the poor, and invest in infrastructure to overcome market failures. Footnotesa (...)
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  37. Peter Vallentyne (2003). The Rights and Duties of Childrearing. William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal 11:991-1010.
    What rights and duties do adults have with respect to raising children? Who, for example, has the right to decide how and where a particular child will live, be educated, receive health care, and spend recreational time? I argue that neither biological (gene-provider) nor..
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  38. Peter Vallentyne (2009). Left-Libertarianism as a Promising Form of Liberal Egalitarianism. Philosophical Exchange:56-71.
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  39.  98
    Peter Vallentyne (2012). Left-Libertarianism. In David Estlund (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press 152.
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  40.  72
    Michael Otsuka, Peter Vallentyne & Hillel Steiner (2005). Why Left-Libertarianism Is Not Incoherent, Indeterminate, or Irrelevant: A Reply to Fried. Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (2):201-215.
    In a recent review essay of a two volume anthology on left-libertarianism (edited by two of us), Barbara Fried has insightfully laid out most of the core issues that confront left-libertarianism. We are each left-libertarians, and we would like to take this opportunity to address some of the general issues that she raises. We shall focus, as Fried does much of the time, on the question of whether left-libertarianism is a well-defined and distinct alternative to existing forms of liberal egalitarianism. (...)
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  41.  80
    Peter Vallentyne (2013). On the Duty of Altruism. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):118-120.
  42. Peter Vallentyne (2007). On Original Appropriation. In Malcolm Murray (ed.), Liberty, Games, and Contracts: Jan Narveson and the Defence of Libertarianism. Aldershot: Ashgate Press
    Libertarianism holds that agents initially fully own themselves. Lockean libertarianism further holds that agents have the moral power to acquire private property in external things as long as a Lockean Proviso—requiring that “enough and as good” be left for others—is satisfied. Radical right-libertarianism, on the other hand, holds that satisfaction of a Lockean Proviso is not necessary for the appropriation of unowned things. This is sometimes defended on the ground that the initial status of external resources as unowned precludes any (...)
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  43.  47
    Peter Vallentyne & Hillel Steiner (eds.) (2000). Left Libertarianism and Its Critics: The Contemporary Debate. Palgrave Publishers Ltd..
    This book contains a collection of important recent writing on left-liberalism, a political philosophy that recognizes both strong liberty rights and strong ...
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  44.  60
    Peter Vallentyne (2009). On the Possibility of Non-Aggregative Priority for the Worst Off. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):258-285.
    We address the question of whether there is a prioritarian moral theory that both (1) avoids giving absolute priority to the worst off (as leximin does) but (2) does not allow arbitrarily small benefits to enough extremely affluent people to take priority over a significant benefit to a worst off person in abject poverty. We argue that this is possible only if one rejects some seemingly plausible conditions.
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  45.  57
    Peter Vallentyne, On Mack on Locke on Property. Liberty Matters.
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  46.  54
    Peter Vallentyne & Bertil Tungodden (2013). Liberal Resourcism: Problems and Possibilities. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (4):348-369.
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  47. Peter Vallentyne (1998). The Nomic Role Account of Carving Reality at the Joints. Synthese 115 (2):171-198.
    Natural properties are those that carve reality at the joints. The notion of carving reality at the joints, however, is somewhat obscure, and is often understood in terms of making for similarity, conferring causal powers, or figuring in the laws of nature. I develop and assess an account of the third sort according to which carving reality at the joints is understood as having the right level of determinacy relative to nomic roles. The account has the attraction of involving very (...)
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  48. Peter Vallentyne (1986). Book Review:What Is a Law of Nature? D. M. Armstrong. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 53 (1):154-.
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  49. Peter Vallentyne (1999). Left-Libertarian Theories of Justice. Revue Economique 50:859-878.
    Libertarian theories of justice hold that agents, at least initially, own themselves fully, and thus owe no service to others, except through voluntary action. The most familiar libertarian theories are right-libertarian in that they hold that natural resources are initially unowned and, under a broad range of realistic circumstances, can be privately appropriated without the consent of, or any significant payment to, the other members of society. Leftlibertarian theories, by contrast, hold that natural resources are owned by the members of (...)
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  50. Peter Vallentyne (1998). The Nomic Role Account of Carving Reality at the Joints. Synthese 115 (2):171-198.
    Natural properties are those that carve reality at the joints. The notion of carving reality at the joints, however, is somewhat obscure. It is sometimes understood in terms of making for similarity, sometimes in terms of conferring causal powers, and sometimes in terms of figuring in the laws of nature. I develop and assess an account of the third sort according to which carving reality at the joints is understood as having the right level of determinacy relative to nomic roles. (...)
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