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Profile: Peter Sullivan (Martin)
  1. Peter M. Sullivan (2004). Frege's Logic. In Dov M. Gabbay, John Woods & Akihiro Kanamori (eds.), Handbook of the History of Logic. Elsevier 3--659.
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  2.  52
    Peter M. Sullivan (2004). ‘The General Propositional Form is a Variable’ (Tractatus 4.53). Mind 113 (449):43-56.
    Wittgenstein presents in the Tractatus a variable purporting to capture the general form of proposition. One understanding of what Wittgenstein is doing there, an understanding in line with the ‘new’ reading of his work championed by Diamond, Conant and others, sees it as a deflationary or even an implosive move—a move by which a concept sometimes put by philosophers to distinctively metaphysical use is replaced, in a perspicuous notation, by an innocent device of generalization, thereby dispersing the clouds of (...)
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  3. Peter M. Sullivan (2005). Identity Theories of Truth and the Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 28 (1):43–62.
    The paper is concerned with the idea that the world is the totality of facts, not of things – with what is involved in thinking of the world in that way, and why one might do so. It approaches this issue through a comparison between Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and the identity theory of truth proposed by Hornsby and McDowell.The paper’s positive conclusion is that there is a genuine affinity between these two. A negative contention is that the modern identity theory (...)
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  4.  83
    Peter M. Sullivan (2002). On Trying to Be Resolute: A Response to Kremer on the Tractatus. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):43–78.
    A way of reading the Tractatus has been proposed which, according to its advocates, is importantly novel and essentially distinct from anything to be found in the work of such previously influential students of the book as Anscombe, Stenius, Hacker or Pears. The point of difference is differently described, but the currently most used description seems to be Goldfarb’s term ‘resolution’ – hence one speaks of ‘the (or a) resolute reading’. I’ll shortly ask what resolution is. For now, it (...)
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  5.  52
    Peter M. Sullivan (2000). The Totality of Facts. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):175–192.
    Wittgenstein, in the Tractatus, conceives the world as ‘the totality of facts’. Type-stratification threatens that conception : the totality of facts is an obvious example of an illegitimate totality. Wittgenstein’s notion of truthoperation evidently has some role to play in avoiding that threat, allowing propositions, and so facts, to constitute a single type. The paper seeks to explain that role in a way that integrates the ‘philosophical’ and ‘technical’ pressures on the notion of an operation.
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  6.  91
    Peter M. Sullivan (1996). The 'Truth' in Solipsism, and Wittgenstein's Rejection of the A Priori. European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):195-220.
  7.  40
    Peter M. Sullivan (2003). A Note on Incompleteness and Heterologicality. Analysis 63 (277):32–38.
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  8.  5
    Johannes L. Brandl & Peter M. Sullivan (1998). Preface. Grazer Philosophische Studien 55:1-2.
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  9. Peter M. Sullivan (2004). What is the Tractatus About? In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's Lasting Significance. Routledge
     
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  10.  33
    Peter M. Sullivan (1992). The Functional Model of Sentential Complexity. Journal of Philosophical Logic 21 (1):91 - 108.
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  11.  60
    Peter M. Sullivan (2005). What is Squiggle? Ramsey on Wittgenstein's Theory of Judgement. In Hallvard Lillehammer & D. H. Mellor (eds.), Ramsey's Legacy. Oxford University Press 53--71.
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  12.  28
    Peter M. Sullivan (1994). The Sense of `a Name of a Truth-Value'. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (177):476-481.
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  13.  40
    Peter M. Sullivan (1998). The "Modal Extension Principle": A Question About Peacocke's Approach to Modality. Mind 107 (427):653-660.
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  14.  41
    Peter M. Sullivan (2010). Michael Dummett's Frege. In Tom Ricketts & Michael D. Potter (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Frege. Cambridge University Press
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  15.  16
    Peter M. Sullivan (1995). Wittgenstein on “The Foundations of Mathematics”, June 1927. Theoria 61 (2):105-142.
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  16.  17
    Peter M. Sullivan (1994). Problems for a Construction of Meaning and Intention. Mind 103 (410):147-168.
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  17.  17
    Peter M. Sullivan (2000). Frege. Philosophical Review 109 (4):648-652.
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  18.  37
    Peter M. Sullivan (2003). Simplicity and Analysis in Early Wittgenstein. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):72–88.
    But logic as it stands, e.g. in Principia Mathematica, can quite well be applied to our ordinary propositions; e.g. from ‘All men are mortal’ and ‘Socrates is a man’ there follows according to this logic ‘Socrates is mortal’, which is obviously correct, even though I equally obviously do not know what structure is possessed by the thing Socrates or the property of mortality. Here they just function as simple objects.
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  19.  29
    Peter M. Sullivan (2007). How Did Frege Fall Into the Contradiction? Ratio 20 (1):91–107.
    Quine made it conventional to portray the contradiction that destroyed Frege’s logicism as some kind of act of God, a thunderbolt that descended from a clear blue sky. This portrayal suited the moral Quine was antecedently inclined to draw, that intuition is bankrupt, and that reliance on it must therefore be replaced by a pragmatic methodology. But the portrayal is grossly misleading, and Quine’s moral simply false. In the person of others – Cantor, Dedekind, and Zermelo – intuition was working (...)
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  20.  5
    Peter M. Sullivan (1993). The Nature of All Being: A Study of Wittgenstein's Modal Atomism. Philosophical Books 34 (3):148-151.
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  21.  2
    Peter M. Sullivan (1996). Thinking Out Loud: An Essay on the Relation Between Thought and Language. Philosophical Books 37 (3):195-198.
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  22.  2
    Peter M. Sullivan (1992). Russell's Idealist Apprenticeship. Philosophical Books 33 (3):146-148.
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  23.  1
    Peter M. Sullivan (1994). Georg Cavallar. Mind 103 (410).
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  24. Johannes Brandl & Peter M. Sullivan (eds.) (1998). New Essays on the Philosophy of Michael Dummett. Rodopi.
    Ever since the publication of 'Truth' in 1959 Sir Michael Dummett has been acknowledged as one of the most profoundly creative and influential of contemporary philosophers. His contributions to the philosophy of thought and language, logic, the philosophy of mathematics, and metaphysics have set the terms of some of most fruitful discussions in philosophy. His work on Frege stands unparalleled, both as landmark in the history of philosophy and as a deep reflection on the defining commitments of the analytic school.This (...)
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  25. Peter M. Sullivan (1990). Formal Concepts an Interpretation and Defence of Some Central Tractarian Themes.
     
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  26. Peter M. Sullivan, Syntehsizing Without Concepts.
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  27.  13
    Peter M. Sullivan & Michael D. Potter (eds.) (2013). Wittgenstein's Tractatus: History and Interpretation. Oxford University Press.
    These new studies of Wittgenstein's Tractatus represent a significant step beyond recent polemical debate.
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