Search results for 'Peter Mark Ainsworth' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Schira Mark, Puckett Alexander, Breakspear Michael, Robinson Peter & Aquino Kevin (2013). Towards Concrete, in-Depth and Applicable Predictions of BOLD Responses; Modelling the Complete Cascade From Visual Stimulus to Neuronal Response to Vascular Hemodynamics. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 1200.0
  2. Peter Mark Ainsworth (2010). What is Ontic Structural Realism? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (1):50-57.score: 290.0
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  3. Peter Mark Ainsworth (2008). Cosmic Inflation and the Past Hypothesis. Synthese 162 (2):157 - 165.score: 290.0
    The past hypothesis is that the entropy of the universe was very low in the distant past. It is put forward to explain the entropic arrow of time but it has been suggested (e.g. [Penrose, R. (1989a). The emperor’s new mind. London:Vintage Books; Penrose, R. (1989b). Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 571, 249–264; Price, H. (1995). In S. F. Savitt (Ed.), Times’s arrows today. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Price, H. (1996). Time’s arrow and Archimedes’ point. Oxford: Oxford (...)
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  4. Peter Ainsworth (2011). Ontic Structural Realism and the Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles. Erkenntnis 75 (1):67-84.score: 120.0
    Recently, there has been a debate as to whether or not the principle of the identity of indiscernibles (the PII) is compatible with quantum physics. It is also sometimes argued that the answer to this question has implications for the debate over the tenability of ontic structural realism (OSR). The central aim of this paper is to establish what relationship there is (if any) between the PII and OSR. It is argued that one common interpretation of OSR is undermined if (...)
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  5. Peter M. Ainsworth (2009). Newman's Objection. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (1):135-171.score: 120.0
    This paper is a review of work on Newman's objection to epistemic structural realism (ESR). In Section 2, a brief statement of ESR is provided. In Section 3, Newman's objection and its recent variants are outlined. In Section 4, two responses that argue that the objection can be evaded by abandoning the Ramsey-sentence approach to ESR are considered. In Section 5, three responses that have been put forward specifically to rescue the Ramsey-sentence approach to ESR from the modern versions of (...)
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  6. Peter M. Ainsworth (2012). The Gibbs Paradox and the Definition of Entropy in Statistical Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 79 (4):542-560.score: 120.0
  7. Peter M. Ainsworth (2007). Untangling Entanglement. Foundations of Physics 37 (1):144-158.score: 120.0
    In this paper recent work that attempts to link quantum entanglement to (i) thermodynamic energy, (ii) thermodynamic entropy and (iii) information is reviewed. With respect to the first two links the paper is essentially expository. The final link is elaborated on: it is argued that the value of the entanglement of a bipartite system in a pure state is equal to the value of the irreducible uncertainty (i.e. irreducibly missing information) about its subsystems and that this suggests that entanglement gives (...)
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  8. Peter M. Ainsworth (2012). The Third Path to Structural Realism. Hopos 2 (2):307-320.score: 120.0
  9. Peter M. Ainsworth (2011). What Chains Does Liouville's Theorem Put on Maxwell's Demon? Philosophy of Science 78 (1):149-164.score: 120.0
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  10. Peter Ainsworth (2000). The Image of the City in Peace and War in a Burgundian Manuscript of Jean Froissart's Chronicles. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D'Histoire 78 (2):295-314.score: 120.0
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  11. Peter Ainsworth (1999). A Parisian in New York: Pierpont Morgan Library MS M. 804 Revisited. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 81 (3):127-151.score: 120.0
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  12. Mary D. Salter Ainsworth (1978). The Bowlby-Ainsworth Attachment Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):436.score: 120.0
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  13. Fabienne Peter (2009). Democratic Legitimacy Without Collective Rationality Fabienne Peter. In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan. 143.score: 120.0
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  14. Madsen Peter (2004). Peter Singer on Global Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (1).score: 120.0
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  15. Wendy H. Raskind, Beate Peter, Todd Richards, Mark M. Eckert & Virginia W. Berninger (2012). The Genetics of Reading Disabilities: From Phenotypes to Candidate Genes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 120.0
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  16. David Archard (2007). Is It Rape? On Acquaintance Rape and Taking Women's Consent Seriously - by Joan McGregor, Making Sense of Sexual Consent - by Mark Cowling & Paul Reynolds, the Logic of Consent, the Diversity and Deceptiveness of Consent as a Defence to Criminal Conduct - by Peter Westen, and Consent to Sexual Relations - by Lan Wertheimer. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):209–221.score: 36.0
  17. Barbara D. Webster (1984). An Excellent, Readable Botany Text Botany Peter M. Ray Taylor A. Steeves Sara A. Fultz Mark Jacobs. Bioscience 34 (3):184-184.score: 36.0
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  18. Thomas I. White (2013). Review Whales and Dolphins: Cognition, Culture, Conservation and Human Perceptions Brakes Philippa Simmonds Mark Peter Earthscan London. Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (2):222-224.score: 36.0
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  19. Elizabeth & Stephen Alderman (2009). A Mark for Peter. Criminal Justice Ethics 28 (1):1-4.score: 36.0
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  20. Deborah McGrady (2008). Godfried Croenen and Peter Ainsworth, Eds., Patrons, Authors and Workshops: Books and Book Production in Paris Around 1400.(Synthema, 4.) Louvain, Paris, and Dudley, Mass.: Peeters, 2006. Paper. Pp. Xxi, 529 Plus 17 Color Plates; 82 Black-and-White Figures and Tables.€ 69. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (2):417-419.score: 36.0
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  21. Michael Pusey (1994). Reviews : Peter Beilharz, Mark Considine and Rob Watts, Arguing About the Welfare State: The Australian Experience (Allen and Unwin, 1992). Thesis Eleven 38 (1):190-193.score: 36.0
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  22. Andrew Sneddon (2005). Moral Responsibility: The Difference of Strawson, and the Difference It Should Make. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (3):239-264.score: 27.0
    P.F. Strawson’s work on moral responsibility is well-known. However, an important implication of the landmark “Freedom and Resentment” has gone unnoticed. Specifically, a natural development of Strawson’s position is that we should understand being morally responsible as having externalistically construed pragmatic criteria, not individualistically construed psychological ones. This runs counter to the contemporary ways of studying moral responsibility. I show the deficiencies of such contemporary work in relation to Strawson by critically examining the positions of John Martin Fischer and (...) Ravizza, R. Jay Wallace, and Philip Pettit for problems due to individualistic assumptions. (shrink)
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  23. Gordon Pettit (2005). Moral Responsibility and the Ability to Do Otherwise. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:303-319.score: 27.0
    Frankfurt-style examples (FSEs) cast doubt on the initially plausible claim that an ability to do otherwise is necessary for moral responsibility. Following the lead of Peter van Inwagen and others, I argue that if we are careful in distinguishing events by causal origins, then we see that FSEs fail to show that one may be morally responsible for x, yet have no alternatives to x. I provide reasons for a fine-grained causal origins approach to events apart from the context (...)
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  24. Riccardo Strobino (2012). Truth and Paradox in Late XIVth Century Logic : Peter of Mantua’s Treatise on Insoluble Propositions. Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 23:475-519.score: 18.0
    This paper offers an analysis of a hitherto neglected text on insoluble propositions dating from the late XiVth century and puts it into perspective within the context of the contemporary debate concerning semantic paradoxes. The author of the text is the italian logician Peter of Mantua (d. 1399/1400). The treatise is relevant both from a theoretical and from a historical standpoint. By appealing to a distinction between two senses in which propositions are said to be true, it offers an (...)
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  25. Paul Richard Blum (2013). Péter Pázmánys Seelenlehre. In Alinka Ajkay Rita Bajáki (ed.), Pázmány Nyomában. Tanulmányok Hargittay Emil tiszteletére. Mondat.score: 18.0
    Péter Pázmány taught philosophy at the Jesuit university of Graz, end of 16th century. This analyzes his interpretation of Aristotelian psychology.
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  26. Kevin Schilbrack (2009). Rationality, Relativism, and Religion: A Reinterpretation of Peter Winch. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):399-412.score: 18.0
    Many point to Peter Winch’s discussion of rationality, relativism, and religion as a paradigmatic example of cultural relativism. In this paper, I argue that Winch’s relationship to relativism is widely misinterpreted in that, despite his pluralistic understanding of rationality, Winch does allow for universal features of culture in virtue of which cross-cultural understanding and even critique is possible. Nevertheless, I also argue that given the kind of cultural universals that Winch produces, he fails to avoid relativism. This is because (...)
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  27. N. N. Trakakis (2010). Against Theodicy: A Response to Peter Forrest. Sophia 49 (1):129-140.score: 18.0
    In responding to Peter Forrest’s defence of ‘tough-minded theodicy’, I point to some problematic features of theodicies of this sort, in particular their commitment to an anthropomorphic conception of God which tends to assimilate the Creator to the creaturely and so diminishes the otherness and mystery of God. This remains the case, I argue, even granted Forrest’s view that God may have a very different kind of morality from the one we mortals are subject to.
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  28. Anthony Skelton (forthcoming). Singer, Peter (1946-). In Michael Gibbons (ed.), Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 18.0
    A short encyclopedia article on Peter Singer.
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  29. Luca Malatesti, Forum on Peter, Carruthers. Phenomenal Consciousness: A Naturalistic Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Forum 2 SWIF Philosophy of Mind Review.score: 18.0
    A book symposium on Peter, Carruthers. Phenomenal Consciousness: A Naturalistic Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Contents: Author's précis Colin Allen, Evolving Phenomenal Consciousness - Carruthers's reply. José Luis Bermúdez, Commentary - Carruthers's reply - Reply to Carruthers: Properties, first-order representationalism and reinforcement. Joseph Levine, Commentary - Carruthers's reply. William Seager, Dispositions and Consciousness - Carruthers's reply.
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  30. Peter Winch & Raimond Gaita (eds.) (1990). Value and Understanding: Essays for Peter Winch. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Written by eminent philosophers from Britain, Europe, America, and Australia, the essays of this collection are a tribute to Peter Winch, whose work is marked by his deep appreciation of the most fundamental aspect of Wittgenstein's legacy: that we cannot detach our concepts from their roots in human life. The voices in this volume unite in different tones of sympathy and criticism by discussing the theme of human conditioning: the human conditioning of what we can find intelligible, possible and (...)
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  31. David Koepsell (2010). Peter Hare and the Problem of Evil. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):53-59.score: 18.0
    Peter Hare and Edward Madden's collaborative book Evil and the Concept of God (968) has become a staple in literature about the problem of evil and remains frequently cited by supporters and critics alike. The major concepts of the work arose out of earlier papers in which they first began to formulate their arguments about the problem of evil. Their article "Evil and Unlimited Power" embodies many of their arguments against quasi-theist attempts to resolve the problem of evil.1 Assembled (...)
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  32. Sven Walter (2010). Cognitive Extension: The Parity Argument, Functionalism, and the Mark of the Cognitive. Synthese 177 (2):285-300.score: 18.0
    During the past decade, the so-called “hypothesis of cognitive extension,” according to which the material vehicles of some cognitive processes are spatially distributed over the brain and the extracranial parts of the body and the world, has received lots of attention, both favourable and unfavourable. The debate has largely focussed on three related issues: (1) the role of parity considerations, (2) the role of functionalism, and (3) the importance of a mark of the cognitive. This paper critically assesses these (...)
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  33. Jose Filipe Silva & Juhana Toivanen (2011). The Active Nature of the Soul in Sense Perception: Robert Kilwardby and Peter Olivi. Vivarium 48 (3-4):245-278.score: 18.0
    This article discusses the theories of perception of Robert Kilwardby and Peter of John Olivi. Our aim is to show how in challenging certain assumptions of medieval Aristotelian theories of perception they drew on Augustine and argued for the active nature of the soul in sense perception. For both Kilwardby and Olivi, the soul is not passive with respect to perceived objects; rather, it causes its own cognitive acts with respect to external objects and thus allows the subject to (...)
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  34. Erinn Cunniff Gilson (2009). Peter Hallward: Out of This World: Deleuze and the Philosophy of Creation. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):429-434.score: 18.0
    Review essay of Peter Hallward's Out of This World: Deleuze and the Philosophy of Creation.
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  35. Kieran Bonner (2010). Peter McHugh and Analysis: The One and the Many, the Universal and the Particular, the Whole and the Part. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (2):253-269.score: 18.0
    This paper takes the passing of Peter McHugh as an occasion to examine the intellectual development of his work. The paper is mainly focused on the product of his collaboration with his colleague and friend, Alan Blum. As such, it addresses the tradition of social inquiry, Analysis, which they cofounded. It traces the influence of Harold Garfinkel’s Ethnomethodology on McHugh and on the beginning of Analysis. The collaboration with Blum is examined through a variety of coauthored works but most (...)
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  36. Joseph Margolis (2010). A Word of Thanks for Peter Hare's Patience. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):3-8.score: 18.0
    Peter Hare took a belle-lettriste pleasure in hopping from one philosophical topic to another. Not carelessly but lightheartedly enough. I mean by that, not that there is no deeper interlocking linkage among his many papers—there is—but rather that the center of gravity of each piece rests with the special patience and affection Peter spends on the specific topic some chanced-upon author or authors bring into view. He pursues each such topic intensively in a deliberately narrow-gauged way, testing its (...)
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  37. Andreas Elpidorou (2012). Where is My Mind? Mark Rowlands on the Vehicles of Cognition. Avant 3 (1):145-160.score: 18.0
    Do our minds extend beyond our brains? In a series of publications, Mark Rowlands has argued that the correct answer to this question is an affirmative one. According to Rowlands, certain types of operations on bodily and worldly structures should be considered to be proper and literal parts of our cognitive and mental processes. In this article, I present and critically evaluate Rowlands' position.
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  38. Riccardo Strobino (2011). Contexts of Utterance and Evaluation in Peter of Mantua's Obligationes. Vivarium 49 (1-3):275-299.score: 18.0
    In this paper I will examine the relation between the theory of obligations and its use in sophismatic contexts through the lens of certain pragmatic concerns. In order to do this, I will take a sophism discussed by Peter of Mantua in his treatise on obligations as a case-study. I will first provide a brief outline of the structure of the treatise and then examine a concrete case that shows how the relationship between background assumptions (casus and context of (...)
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  39. Kenneth Colburn & Mary Moore (2010). Honoring (Recollecting) Our Memory of Peter McHugh as Social Theorist. Human Studies 33 (2):271-279.score: 18.0
    The recent death of Peter McHugh becomes an occasion for the remembrance and recollection of the distinctive form of reflexive or analytic social inquiry, which framed his work and that of his longtime friend and collaborator, Alan Blum. Following dual appointments at York University, Toronto, Canada in 1972, Blum and McHugh’s partnership formed the basis for a community of scholars and students throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. A brief review of McHugh and Blum’s works shows theoretical roots in (...)
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  40. David Lynes (2010). Studying Sociology with Peter McHugh. Human Studies 33 (2):287-288.score: 18.0
    Peter McHugh’s influence on those of us who studied and worked with him as part of York University’s graduate sociology programme in Toronto from the mid-1970s until the late 1980s, while lasting and undeniable, is not necessarily immediately apparent nor easily articulated. What follows is a brief reflection on how this difficulty can be understood as integral to Peter McHugh’s unique contribution both to those of us fortunate enough to have studied with him, and more broadly, to the (...)
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  41. José L. Tasset (2013). Razones para una buena muerte (La justificación de la eutanasia en la tradición utilitarista: De David Hume a Peter Singer). Télos 18 (1-2):153-195.score: 18.0
    There are good moral reasons to support euthanasia, and these reasons are fundamentally of a utilitarian root. There are few moral reasons to oppose euthanasia in its strict sense, and they are clearly outweighed by the reasons argumented from a utilitarian perspective. Such teleological and consequentialist good reasons were originally advanced by David Hume in his brief and brilliant essay "Of Suicide" (1757), the true source for current Bioethics. Hume's arguments have been expanded in scope by some contemporary utilitarians, especially (...)
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  42. John J. McDermott (2010). Philosophical Remarks on Peter Hare. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):73-77.score: 18.0
    These remarks are offered as a celebration of Peter Hare as a philosopher. Stressed here is the astute character of Hare's philosophical commentary.
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  43. José Andrés Quintero Restrepo (2013). Mark Twain y la verdad nociva. Escritos 20 (45):417-434.score: 18.0
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens o Mark Twain es el autor del Diario de Adán y Eva, Un yanki en la corte del rey Arturo, Las aventuras de Tom Sawyer, Las aventuras de Huckleberry Finn y otras. Este escritor norteamericano asumió la práctica literaria como un asunto que va más allá del entretenimiento: escribió para interpelar al lector. Y este detalle salta a la vista con un libro que rara veces es referenciado: Sobre la decadencia del arte de mentir, texto que (...)
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  44. Coos Engelsma (2014). On Peter Klein's Concept of Arbitrariness. Metaphilosophy 45 (2):192-200.score: 18.0
    According to Peter Klein, foundationalism fails because it allows a vicious form of arbitrariness. The present article critically discusses his concept of arbitrariness. It argues that the condition Klein takes to be necessary and sufficient for an epistemic item to be arbitrary is neither necessary nor sufficient. It also argues that Klein's concept of arbitrariness is not a concept of something that is obviously vicious. Even if Klein succeeds in establishing that foundationalism allows what he regards as arbitrariness, this (...)
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  45. José Andrés Quintero Restrepo (2012). Mark Twain y la verdad nociva. Escritos 20 (45):417-434.score: 18.0
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens o Mark Twain es el autor del Diario de Adán y Eva, Un yanki en la corte del rey Arturo, Las aventuras de Tom Sawyer, Las aventuras de Huckleberry Finn y otras. Este escritor norteamericano asumió la práctica literaria como un asunto que va más allá del entretenimiento: escribió para interpelar al lector. Y este detalle salta a la vista con un libro que rara veces es referenciado: Sobre la decadencia del arte de mentir, texto que (...)
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  46. Mark Rowlands (2009). Extended Cognition and the Mark of the Cognitive. Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):1 – 19.score: 15.0
    According to the thesis of the extended mind (EM) , at least some token cognitive processes extend into the cognizing subject's environment in the sense that they are (partly) composed of manipulative, exploitative, and transformative operations performed by that subject on suitable environmental structures. EM has attracted four ostensibly distinct types of objection. This paper has two goals. First, it argues that these objections all reduce to one basic sort: all the objections can be resolved by the provision of an (...)
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  47. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.score: 15.0
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism (Cambridge, 1990), and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. The book (...)
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  48. David Sobel (2009). Review of Mark Schroeder, Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).score: 15.0
    I assess Schroeder's book Slaves of the Passions and isolate some grounds for concerns about the overall position.
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  49. Peter Hanks (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Recent Work on Propositions. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):889-892.score: 15.0
    Some of the most interesting recent work in philosophy of language and metaphysics is focused on questions about propositions, the abstract, truth-bearing contents of sentences and beliefs. The aim of this guide is to give instructors and students a road map for some significant work on propositions since the mid-1990s. This work falls roughly into two areas: challenges to the existence of propositions and theories about the nature and structure of propositions. The former includes both a widely discussed puzzle about (...)
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  50. Peter Coghlan & Nick Trakakis (2006). Confronting the Horror of Natural Evil: An Exchange Between Peter Coghlan and Nick Trakakis. Sophia 45 (2):5-26.score: 15.0
    In this exchange, Peter Coghlan and Nick Trakakis discuss the problem of natural evil in the light of the recent Asian tsunami disaster. The exchange begins with an extract from a newspaper article written by Coghlan on the tsunami, followed by three rounds of replies and counter-replies, and ending with some final comments from Trakakis. While critical of any attempt to show that human life is good overall despite its natural evils, Coghlan argues that instances of natural evil, even (...)
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