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Profile: Peter Menzies (Macquarie University)
  1. Christian List & Peter Menzies, My Brain Made Me Do It: The Exclusion Argument Against Free Will, and What’s Wrong with It.
    In this short paper, we offer a critical assessment of the "exclusion argument against free will". While the exclusion argument has received much attention in the literature on mental causation, it is seldom discussed in relation to free will. However, in a more informal way, the argument has become increasingly influential in neuroscientific discussions of free will, where it plausibly underlies the view that advances in neuroscience, with its mechanistic picture of how the brain generates thought and behaviour, seriously challenge (...)
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  2. Peter Menzies, Capacities, Natures and Pluralism: A New Metaphysics For.
    thought-provoking exploration of the role of laws and models in the sciences, with In her alternative metaphysical framework, Cartwright relegates regularities in special emphasis on physics and economics. Cartwright proposes a novel metaphysics..
     
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  3. Peter Menzies (forthcoming). Critical Notice of Alexander Bird, Nature's Metaphysics: Laws and Properties. Analysis.
    This book advocates dispositional essentialism, the view that natural properties have dispositional essences.1 So, for example, the essence of the property of being negatively charged is to be disposed to attract positively charged objects. From this fact it follows that it is a law that all negatively charged objects will attract positively 10 charged objects; and indeed that this law is metaphysically necessary. Since the identity of the property of being negatively charged is determined by its being related in a (...)
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  4. Peter Menzies (2013). Mental Causation in the Physical World. In Sophie C. Gibb & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), Mental Causation and Ontology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5. Peter Menzies (2013). Physical World. In Sophie C. Gibb & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), Mental Causation and Ontology. Oxford University Press. 58.
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  6. Peter Menzies (2012). The Causal Structure of Mechanisms. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (4):796-805.
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  7. Peter Menzies (2011). Dependence in Causal Judgements. In Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Sarah R. Beck (eds.), Understanding Counterfactuals, Understanding Causation. Oxford University Press. 186.
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  8. Peter Menzies (2011). The Role of Counterfactual Dependence in Causal Judgements”. In Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Sarah R. Beck (eds.), Understanding Counterfactuals, Understanding Causation. Oxford University Press.
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  9. Peter Menzies (2011). „The Role of Counterfactual Dependence in Causal Judgements”, U: Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack and Sarah R. Beck. In Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Sarah R. Beck (eds.), Understanding Counterfactuals, Understanding Causation. Oxford University Press. 186--207.
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  10. Max Coltheart, Peter Menzies & John Sutton (2010). Abductive Inference and Delusional Belief. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 15 (1):261-287.
    Delusional beliefs have sometimes been considered as rational inferences from abnormal experiences. We explore this idea in more detail, making the following points. Firstly, the abnormalities of cognition which initially prompt the entertaining of a delusional belief are not always conscious and since we prefer to restrict the term “experience” to consciousness we refer to “abnormal data” rather than “abnormal experience”. Secondly, we argue that in relation to many delusions (we consider eight) one can clearly identify what the abnormal cognitive (...)
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  11. Peter Menzies (2010). Norms, Causes, and Alternative Possibilities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (14):346-347.
    I agree with Knobe's claim in his “Person as Scientist, Person as Moralist” article that moral considerations are integral to the workings of people's competence in making causal judgments. However, I disagree with the particular explanation he gives of the way in which moral considerations influence causal judgments. I critically scrutinize his explanation and outline a better one.
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  12. Peter Menzies (2010). Reasons and Causes Revisited. In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press.
  13. Peter Menzies & Christian List (2010). The Causal Autonomy of the Special Sciences. In Cynthia Mcdonald & Graham Mcdonald (eds.), Emergence in Mind. Oxford University Press.
    The systems studied in the special sciences are often said to be causally autonomous, in the sense that their higher-level properties have causal powers that are independent of those of their more basic physical properties. This view was espoused by the British emergentists, who claimed that systems achieving a certain level of organizational complexity have distinctive causal powers that emerge from their constituent elements but do not derive from them.2 More recently, non-reductive physicalists have espoused a similar view about the (...)
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  14. Helen Beebee, Peter Menzies & Christopher Hitchcock (eds.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oxford University Press.
    Causation is a central topic in many areas of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, ethics, history of philosophy, and philosophy ...
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  15. Christian List & Peter Menzies (2009). Nonreductive Physicalism and the Limits of the Exclusion Principle. Journal of Philosophy 106 (9):475-502.
    It is often argued that higher-level special-science properties cannot be causally efficacious since the lower-level physical properties on which they supervene are doing all the causal work. This claim is usually derived from an exclusion principle stating that if a higher-level property F supervenes on a physical property F* that is causally sufficient for a property G, then F cannot cause G. We employ an account of causation as difference-making to show that the truth or falsity of this principle is (...)
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  16. Peter Menzies (2009). Nature's Metaphysics. Analysis 69 (4):769-778.
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  17. Peter Menzies (2009). Nonreductive Physicalism and the Limits of the Exclusion Principle. Journal of Philosophy 106 (9):475-502.
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  18. Peter Menzies (2009). Platitudes and Counterexamples. In Helen Beebee, Peter Menzies & Christopher Hitchcock (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oxford University Press. 341--367.
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  19. Peter Menzies (2009). The Causes of Colour Experience. In Ian Ravenscroft (ed.), Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes From the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford University Press. 141.
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  20. Peter Menzies (2009). The Folk Theory of Colours and the Causes of Colour Experience. In Ian Ravenscroft (ed.), Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes from the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford University Press.
     
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  21. Peter Menzies & Huw Price (2009). Is Semantics in the Plan? In David Braddon-Mitchell & Robert Nola (eds.), Conceptual Analysis and Philosophical Naturalism. Mit Press. 159--82.
    The so-called Canberra Plan is a grandchild of the Ramsey-Carnap treatment of theoretical terms. In its original form, the Ramsey-Carnap approach provided a method for analysing the meaning of scientific terms, such as “electron”, “gene” and “quark”—terms whose meanings could plausibly be delineated by their roles within scientific theories. But in the hands of David Lewis (1970, 1972), the original approach begat a more ambitious descendant, generalised and extended in two distinct ways: first, Lewis applied the technique to analyse the (...)
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  22. Peter Menzies, Counterfactual Theories of Causation. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The basic idea of counterfactual theories of causation is that the meaning of causal claims can be explained in terms of counterfactual conditionals of the form “If A had not occurred, C would not have occurred”. While counterfactual analyses have been given of type-causal concepts, most counterfactual analyses have focused on singular causal or token-causal claims of the form “event c caused event e”. Analyses of token-causation have become popular in the last thirty years, especially since the development in the (...)
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  23. Peter Menzies (2008). The Exclusion Problem, the Determination Relation, and Contrastive Causation. In Jakob Hohwy & Jesper Kallestrup (eds.), Being Reduced: New Essays on Reduction, Explanation, and Causation. Oxford University Press.
     
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  24. Peter Menzies (2007). Causation in Context. In Huw Price & Richard Corry (eds.), Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Oxford University Press.
     
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  25. Peter Menzies (2007). Mental Causation on the Program Model. In Geoffrey Brennan, Robert Goodin, Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), Common Minds: Themes From the Philosophy of Philip Pettit. Clarendon Press.
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  26. Peter Menzies, A Structural Equations Account of Negative Causation.
    This paper criticizes a recent account of token causation that states that negative causation involving absences of events is of a fundamentally different kind from positive causation involving events. The paper employs the structural equations framework to advance a theory of token causation that applies uniformly to positive and negative causation alike.
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  27. Peter Menzies (2004). Causal Models, Token Causation, and Processes. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):820-832.
    Judea Pearl (2000) has recently advanced a theory of token causation using his structural equations approach. This paper examines some counterexamples to Pearl's theory, and argues that the theory can be modified in a natural way to overcome them.
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  28. Peter Menzies (2004). Difference-Making in Context. In J. Collins, N. Hall & L. Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. Mit Press.
    Several different approaches to the conceptual analysis of causation are guided by the idea that a cause is something that makes a difference to its effects. These approaches seek to elucidate the concept of causation by explicating the concept of a difference-maker in terms of better-understood concepts. There is no better example of such an approach than David Lewis’ analysis of causation, in which he seeks to explain the concept of a difference-maker in counterfactual terms. Lewis introduced his counterfactual theory (...)
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  29. Peter Menzies (2003). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):302.
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  30. Peter Menzies (2003). Current Issues in Causation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):302-302.
    Book Information Current Issues in Causation. Current Issues in Causation Wolfgang Spohn Marion Ledwig Michael Esfeld Paderborn Mentis 2001 207 Paperback DM 78 Edited by Wolfgang Spohn; Marion Ledwig; Michael Esfeld. Mentis. Paderborn. Pp. 207. Paperback:DM 78.
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  31. Peter Menzies (2003). The Causal Efficacy of Mental States. In Sven Walter & Heinz-Dieter Heckmann (eds.), Physicalism and Mental Causation. Imprint Academic. 195--223.
    You are asked to call out the letters on a chart during an eyeexamination: you see and then read out the letters ‘U’, ‘R’, and ‘X’. Commonsense says that your perceptual experiences causally control your calling out the letters. Or suppose you are playing a game of chess intent on winning: you plan your strategy and move your chess pieces accordingly. Again, commonsense says that your intentions and plans causally control your moving the chess pieces. These causal judgements are as (...)
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  32. Paul M. Pietroski & Peter Menzies (2003). Causing Actions. Mind and Language 18 (4):440-446.
    Paul Pietroski presents an original philosophical theory of actions and their mental causes. We often act for reasons, deliberating and choosing among options, based on our beliefs and desires. But because bodily motions always have biochemical causes, it can seem that thinking and acting are biochemical processes. Pietroski argues that thoughts and deeds are in fact distinct from, though dependent on, underlying biochemical processes within persons.
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  33. Peter Menzies (2002). Capacities, Natures and Pluralism: A New Metaphysics for Science? Philosophical Books 43:261-270.
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  34. Peter Menzies (2002). Is Causation a Genuine Relation? In H. Lillehammer & G. Rodriguez-Pereyra (eds.), Real Metaphysics: Festschrift for D. H. Mellor. Routledge.
    had a salutary influence in encouraging metaphysicians to think about these issues of each other. But, as it happens, they come across their victim at the same time and place. Both assassins take careful aim, their fingers poised to pull their in clear-headed, realist ways.
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  35. Peter Menzies (2002). The Role of Causation in Philosophical Naturalism. In D. Macarthur M. de Caro (ed.), The Claims of Naturalism. Harvard University Press.
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  36. Peter Menzies (1999). Intrinsic Versus Extrinsic Conceptions of Causation. In H. Sankey (ed.), Laws and Causation: Australasian Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer. 313-329.
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  37. Peter Menzies (1998). How Justified Are the Humean Doubts About Intrinsic Causal Links? Communication and Cognition. Monographies 31 (4):339-364.
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  38. Peter Menzies (1998). Possibility and Conceivability: A Response-Dependent Account of Their Connections. In Roberto Casati (ed.), European Review of Philosophy, Volume 3: Response-Dependence. Stanford: CSLI Publications. 255--277.
    In the history of modern philosophy systematic connections were assumed to hold between the modal concepts of logical possibility and necessity and the concept of conceivability. However, in the eyes of many contemporary philosophers, insuperable objections face any attempt to analyze the modal concepts in terms of conceivability. It is important to keep in mind that a philosophical explanation of modality does not have to take the form of a reductive analysis. In this paper I attempt to provide a response-dependent (...)
     
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  39. Peter Menzies (1998). Secondary Qualities Generalized. The Monist 81.
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  40. Peter Menzies (1997). A Counterfactual Analysis of Causation. Mind 106:422.
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  41. Peter Menzies (1996). Probabilistic Causation and the Pre-Emption Problem. Mind 105 (417):85-117.
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  42. Jorge Gracia, Terence Horgan, Victoria Iturralde, Manuel Liz, Peter Menzies, Carlos Moya, Philip Pettit, Graham Priest, Mark Sainsbury & Peter Simons (1995). Call for Papers for'SORITES'SORITES is a New Refereed All-English Electronic International Quarterly of Analytical Philosophy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2).
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  43. Frank Jackson, Peter Menzies & Graham Oppy (1994). The Two Envelope 'Paradox'. Analysis 54 (1):43 - 45.
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  44. Peter Menzies (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 103 (410):216-219.
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  45. Peter Menzies & Philip Pettit (1994). In Defence of Fictionalism About Possible Worlds. Analysis 54 (1):27 - 36.
    Modal functionalism is the view that talk about possible worlds should be construed as talk about fictional objects. The version of modal fictionalism originally presented by Gideon Rosen adopted a simple prefixing strategy for fictionalising possible worlds analyses of modal propositions. However, Stuart Brock and Rosen himself in a later article have independently advanced an objection that shows that the prefixing strategy cannot serve fictionalist purposes. In this paper we defend fictionalism about possible worlds by showing that there are other (...)
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  46. Peter Menzies (1993). Laws, Modality, and Humean Supervenience. In J. Bacon, K. Campbell & L. Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality and Mind: Essays in Honour of D. M. Armstrong. Cambridge University Press.
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  47. Peter Menzies & Philip Pettit (1993). Found: The Missing Explanation. Analysis 53 (2):100 - 109.
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  48. Peter Menzies & Huw Price (1993). Causation as a Secondary Quality. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (2):187-203.
    In this paper we defend the view that the ordinary notions of cause and effect have a direct and essential connection with our ability to intervene in the world as agents.1 This is a well known but rather unpopular philosophical approach to causation, often called the manipulability theory. In the interests of brevity and accuracy, we prefer to call it the agency theory.2 Thus the central thesis of an agency account of causation is something like this: an event A is (...)
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