57 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Peter Millican [54]Peter J. R. Millican [3]
See also:
Profile: Peter Millican (Oxford University)
  1. Peter Millican, Comments on Dario Comments on Dario.
    Understanding what is for Hume a “ “Understanding what is for Hume a sceptical solution is crucial for sceptical solution is crucial for..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Peter Millican, Hume, Causal Realism, and Free Will: The State of the Debate.
    all objects, which are found to be constantly conjoin’d, are upon that account only to be regarded as causes and effects. … the constant conjunction of objects constitutes the very essence of cause and effect … (T 1.4.5.32, my emphasis).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Peter Millican, Or Revolutionary? Or Revolutionary?
    The traditional extreme sceptic portrayed The traditional extreme sceptic portrayed e.g. by Flew (1961) and Stove (1973): e.g. by Flew (1961) and Stove (1973): Deductivism Deductivism..
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Peter Millican, Response to “A Priority, Reason, and Induction in Hume”.
    Over the last three years Hume’s use of the term “a priori” has suddenly become very topical. Three discussions, by Stephen Buckle, myself, and Houston Smit, all focusing on Hume’s argument concerning induction in Section IV of the Enquiry, have independently picked up on this question, which seems previously to have gone almost unnoticed.1 That there is an issue here can be seen by examining what Hume says when considering the foundation of our inferences concerning matter of fact; why, for (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Peter Millican, Structure and Interpretation.
    Hume’s argument concerning induction is the foundation stone of his philosophical system, and one of the most celebrated and influential arguments in the entire literature of western philosophy. It is therefore rather surprising that the enormous attention which has been devoted to it over the years has not resulted in any general consensus as to how it should be interpreted, or, in consequence, how Hume himself should be seen. At one extreme is the traditional view, which takes the argument (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Peter Millican, The Problem of the First Enquiry: Concluding the 1998 Stirling Conference.
    I’d like to start by thanking all those who’ve played a part in making this conference such a success, including all the readers who helped us decide which papers to include, Jane (McIntyre) who chaired the Reading Committee, and especially Tony (Pitson), who organized the splendid local arrangements here in Stirling. Compared to Jane and Tony, I’ve had it relatively easy. Though I proposed, back at Lancaster in 1989, that this year’s conference should be mainly focused on the first Enquiry (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Peter Millican, Abortion.
    The Christian tradition has always taken a generally negative view of abortion, but the moral basis and perceived implications of this negative view have varied greatly. In the early Church abortion and contraception were often seen as broadly equivalent, both involving interference with the natural reproductive process (and an association with sexual immorality which even led some to see contraception as the more sinful of the two). But the tendency to conflate abortion with contraception, and even on similar grounds with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Peter Millican, Beauchamp's Student Editions of the Enquiries.
    As a particular enthusiast for the first Enquiry, Hume’s definitive presentation of his epistemology and metaphysics ☺, I eagerly awaited the new Oxford editions for many years (from when they were initially announced under the aegis of Princeton). Although the Selby- Bigge edition of the Enquiries has done good service, most notably in its role of providing a widely agreed convention for references to Hume’s texts, I have always found it a bit strange that it should be generally thought of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Peter Millican, Comments on Dario Perinetti “Hume's Sceptical Solutions”.
    Perinetti’s paper is interesting and provocative, covering a broad range and suggesting fruitful readings that deserve to be explored further and in detail. Unfortunately, time prevents me from doing these justice, so I shall confine myself mainly to comments on and objections to his general approach. In brief, I shall suggest that his interesting ideas about Hume’s theory of ideas and their limits might be better divorced from his consideration of Humean “sceptical solutions”.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Peter Millican, Hume's 'Compleat Answer to Dr Reid'.
    In October 1775, David Hume wrote to his printer William Strahan, requesting that an ‘Advertisement’ should be attached to remaining copies of the second volume of his Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects. This volume contained his two Enquiries, the Dissertation on the Passions, and The Natural History of Religion, and the Advertisement states that these works should ‘alone be regarded as containing his philosophical sentiments and principles’ (E 2). In the covering letter, Hume comments that this ‘is a compleat (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Peter Millican, Hume, Induction, and Probability.
    The overall aim of this thesis is to understand Hume’s famous argument concerning induction, and to appraise its success in establishing its conclusion. The thesis accordingly falls into two main parts, the first being concerned with analysis and interpretation of the argument itself, and the second with investigation of possible responses to it. Naturally the argument’s interpretation strongly constrains the range of possible replies, and indeed the results of Part I indicate that the only kind of strategy which stands much (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Peter Millican, Hume's Idea of Necessary Connexion: Of What is It the Idea?
    I advance what might be thought a paradoxical thesis: that the central topic of Hume’s long discussions “Of the Idea of Necessary Connexion” is not, in fact, the idea of necessary connexion. However it is not as paradoxical as it first appears, for I shall claim that the “idea” whose origin Hume seeks is, in a sense, an idea-type of which the specific idea of necessary connexion is but one instance. Various lines of evidence support this claim, but my main (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Peter Millican, Hume, Miracles, and Probabilities: Meeting Earman's Challenge.
    The centrepiece of Earman’s provocatively titled book Hume’s Abject Failure: The Argument against Miracles (OUP, 2000) is a probabilistic interpretation of Hume’s famous ‘maxim’ concerning the credibility of miracle reports, followed by a trenchant critique of the maxim when thus interpreted. He argues that the first part of this maxim, once its obscurity is removed, is simply trivial, while the second part is nonsensical. His subsequent discussion culminates with a forthright challenge to any would-be defender of Hume to ‘point (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Peter Millican, Humes Old and New: Cartesian Fellow-Traveller, or Revolutionary?
    themselves seen the Enquiry as the most reliable indicator of Hume’s mature position.3 • On this nexus of topics in particular, the Enquiry is philosophically and expositionally superior.4 This handout is designed to set the scene, by sketching the various positions and theses to be discussed (together with references), and providing some other materials that will be referred to in my talk.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Peter Millican, Induction.
    The word ‘induction’ is derived from Cicero’s ‘inductio’, itself a translation of Aristotle’s ‘epagôgê’. In its traditional sense this denotes the inference of general laws from particular instances, but within modern philosophy it has usually been understood in a related but broader sense, covering any non-demonstrative reasoning that is founded on experience. As such it encompasses reasoning from observed to unobserved, both inference of general laws and of further particular instances, but it excludes those cases of reasoning in which the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Peter Millican, Knowledge.
    LOCKE famously defines knowledge as “the perception of the connexion and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy of any of our Ideas” (Essay IV i 2), but his subsequent discussion significantly extends this somewhat vague and unclear definition. He starts by suggesting that knowledge always concerns one of four types of agreement or disagreement, namely “Identity, or Diversity”, “Relation”, “Co-existence, or necessary connexion”, and “real Existence”--his examples of the first two of these (perceiving the self-identity and distinctness of ideas, and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Peter Millican, Logic.
    The word ‘logic’ as used today is commonly taken to refer to a formal discipline, as indeed it was almost universally from the time of ARISTOTLE until at least the sixteenth century. But the writings of Descartes and his followers (notably Malebranche and the authors of the Port Royal Logic, Arnauld and Nicole) undermined this understanding of the word, preparing the ground for LOCKE to reinterpret it most influentially in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Locke adopted from the Cartesians a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Peter Millican, Miracles and David Hume.
    Probabilities range from 0 to 1. If a proposition has a probability of 0, then it’s certainly false; if 1, then it’s certainly true. A proposition with a probability of ½ (or 0.5, or 50%) is equally likely to be true as false, and a proposition with a probability of ¾ (or 0.75, or 75%) is three times as likely to be true as false.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Peter Millican, Statements and Modality Strawson, Quine and Wolfram.
    Over a period of more than twenty years, Sybil Wolfram gave lectures at Oxford University on Philosophical Logic, a major component of most of the undergraduate degree programmes. She herself had been introduced to the subject by Peter Strawson, and saw herself as working very much within the Strawsonian tradition. Central to this tradition, which began with Strawson's seminal attack on Russell's theory of descriptions in ‘On Referring' (1950), is the distinction between a sentence and what is said by a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Peter Millican, The Complex Problem of Abortion.
    The problem of the morality of abortion is one of the most complex and controversial in the entire field of applied ethics. It may therefore appear rather surprising that the most popular proposed “solutions” to it are extremely simple and straightforward, based on clear-cut universal rules which typically either condemn abortion severely in virtually every case or else deem it to be morally quite unproblematic, and hence permissible whenever the mother wishes. This polarised situation in the theoretical debate, however, is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Peter Millican, Taking Logic for Granted.
    This is just one typical example of a class of arguments which are sometimes used to attack those (such as the author of this article) who presume to criticise philosophers with different views, or from different cultures, by "dogmatically" appealing to the principles of logic. There is, as we shall see, something very odd about this sort of argument, but it does have a certain superficial plausibility, and also an air of moral virtue through its spirit of generous open-mindedness. Who (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peter Millican, The “ Old Hume”.
    Since all inductive inference is equally The main aim of the two definitions of Since all inductive inference is equally The main aim of the two definitions of irrational, there is no consistent basis for irrational, there is no consistent basis for causation is to clarify the meaning of the causation is to clarify the meaning of the drawing any demarcation between drawing any demarcation between concept of concept of “ “necessity necessity” ”, in accordance with , in accordance with (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Peter Millican, The Ontological Argument.
    Any argument which attempts to prove God's existence a priori based only on His nature can be termed an "Ontological Argument". Historically, however, the term is inextricably associated with the famous argument presented in Anselm's Proslogion chapter II, and with the later variant advanced by Descartes in his fifth Meditation and subsequently developed by Leibniz. Some have claimed that Anselm's argument was anticipated in the thought either of various classical philosophers (notably Aristotle, Parmenides, Plato, and Zeno of Cition) or of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Peter J. R. Millican, Hume, Induction and Reason.
    Hume’s view of reason is notoriously hard to pin down, not least because of the apparently contradictory positions which he appears to adopt in different places. The problem is perhaps most clear in his writings concerning induction - in his famous argument of Treatise I iii 6 and Enquiry IV, on the one hand, he seems to conclude that “probable inference” has no rational basis, while elsewhere, for example in much of his writing on natural theology, he seems happy to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Peter Millican (2013). Earman on Hume on Miracles. In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge. 271.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Peter Millican (2012). Hume's 'Scepticism'about Induction. In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum.
  27. Peter Millican (2011). Finding Inspiration in Hume. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):69-74.
    As time moves on, both our philosophical language and our conceptual frameworks evolve, since they are highly abstract and not closely tethered to the relatively solid ground of ordinary life. So to understand Hume’s thinking, it becomes necessary to “translate” what he says into categories increasingly different from his own.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Peter Millican, Hume, Causal Realism, and Free Will.
    My aim in this paper is to present what I consider to be the decisive objection against the ‘New Hume’ Causal realist interpretation of Hume, and to refute three recent attempts to answer this objection. I start in §1 with an outline of the ‘Old’ and ‘New’ interpretations. Then §2 sketches the traditional case in favour of the former, while §3 presents the decisive objection to the latter, based on Hume’s discussions of ‘Liberty and Necessity’ (i.e. free-will and determinism). In (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Peter Millican (2011). Hume's Determinism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):611-642.
    David Hume has traditionally been assumed to be a soft determinist or compatibilist,1 at least in the 'reconciling project' that he presents in Section 8 of the first Enquiry, entitled 'Of liberty and necessity.'2 Indeed, in encyclopedias and textbooks of Philosophy he is standardly taken to be one of the paradigm compatibilists, rivalled in significance only by Hobbes within the tradition passed down through Locke, Mill, Schlick and Ayer to recent writers such as Dennett and Frankfurt.3 Many Hume scholars also (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Peter Millican (2011). Twenty Questions About Hume's “Of Miracles”. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 68:151-192.
    Hume‟s essay on the credibility of miracle reports has always been controversial,1 with much debate over how it should be interpreted, let alone assessed. My aim here is to summarise what I take to be the most plausible views on these issues, both interpretative and philosophical, with references to facilitate deeper investigation if desired. The paper is divided into small sections, each headed by a question that provides a focus. Broadly speaking, §§1-3 and §20 are on Hume‟s general philosophical framework (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Peter Millican (2011). The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):348-353.
    (2011). The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 348-353.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Peter Millican (2010). Hume on Reason and Induction. Hume Studies 24 (1):141-159.
  33. Peter Millican (2009). Hume, Causal Realism, and Causal Science. Mind 118 (471):647-712.
    The ‘New Hume’ interpretation, which sees Hume as a realist about ‘thick’ Causal powers, has been largely motivated by his evident commitment to causal language and causal science. In this, however, it is fundamentally misguided, failing to recognise how Hume exploits his anti-realist conclusions about (upper-case) Causation precisely to support (lower-case) causal science. When critically examined, none of the standard New Humean arguments — familiar from the work of Wright, Craig, Strawson, Buckle, Kail, and others — retains any significant force (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Peter Millican (2007). Humes Old and New: Four Fashionable Falsehoods, and One Unfashionable Truth. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):163–199.
    No categories
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Peter Millican (2007). Hume'a wątpliwości sceptyczne dotyczące indukcji. Nowa Krytyka 20.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Peter Millican (2007). Ontological Arguments and the Superiority of Existence: Reply to Nagasawa. Mind 116 (464):1041-1054.
    Yujin Nagasawa accuses me of attributing to Anselm a principle (the 'principle of the superiority of existence', or PSE) which is not present in his text and which weakens, rather than strengthens, his Ontological Argument. I am undogmatic about the interpretative issue, but insist on a philosophical point: that Nagasawa's rejection of PSE does not help the argument, and appears to do so only because he overlooks the same ambiguity that vitiates the original. My conclusion therefore remains: that the fatal (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Peter Millican & Helen Beebee (2007). Humes Old and New: Four Fashionable Falsehoods, and One Unfashionable Truth. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):163-199.
    Hume has traditionally been understood as an inductive sceptic with positivist tendencies, reducing causation to regular succession and anticipating the modern distinctions between analytic and synthetic, deduction and induction. The dominant fashion in recent Hume scholarship is to reject all this, replacing the ‘Old Hume’ with various New alternatives. Here I aim to counter four of these revisionist readings, presenting instead a broadly traditional interpretation but with important nuances, based especially on Hume’s later works. He asked that we should treat (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Peter Millican (2004). The One Fatal Flaw in Anselm's Argument. Mind 113 (451):437-476.
    Anselm's Ontological Argument fails, but not for any of the various reasons commonly adduced. In particular, its failure has nothing to do with violating deep Kantian principles by treating ‘exists’ as a predicate or making reference to ‘Meinongian’ entities. Its one fatal flaw, so far from being metaphysically deep, is in fact logically shallow, deriving from a subtle scope ambiguity in Anselm's key phrase. If we avoid this ambiguity, and the indeterminacy of reference to which it gives rise, then his (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Peter Millican (ed.) (2002). Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. Oxford University Press.
    This companion to the study of one of the great works of Western philosophy--David Hume's Enquiry concerning Human Understanding (1748)--provides a general overview of the Enquiry, especially for those approaching it for the first time, and sets it in the context of Hume's philosophical work as a whole. It elucidates, analyzes, and assesses the philosophy of the Enquiry, clarifying its interpretation and discussing recent developments in Hume scholarship that are relevant to the Enquiry. The eminent contributors to this volume cover (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Peter Millican (2002). Hume's Sceptical Doubts Concerning Induction. In , Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. Clarendon Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Peter Millican (2002). The Context, Aims, and Structure of Hume's First Enquiry. In , Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. Clarendon Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Andy Clark & Peter Millican (eds.) (1999). Connectionism, Concepts, and Folk Psychology: The Legacy of Alan Turing, Volume II. Clarendon Press.
    This is the second of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing; it celebrates his intellectual legacy within the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. A distinguished international cast of contributors focus on the relationship beteen a scientific, computational image of the mind and a common-sense picture of the mind as an inner arena populated by concepts, beliefs, intentions, and qualia. Topics covered include the causal potency of folk-psychological states, the connectionist reconception of learning and concept formation, the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Peter Millican & A. Clark (eds.) (1999). Connectionism, Concepts and Folk Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    This is the second of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Peter Millican & Andy Clark (eds.) (1999). Machines and Thought: The Legacy of Alan Turing, Volume I. Clarendon Press.
    This is the first of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing, whose pioneering work in the theory of artificial intelligence and computer science continues to be widely discussed today. A group of prominent academics from a wide range of disciplines focus on three questions famously raised by Turing: What, if any, are the limits on machine 'thinking'? Could a machine be genuinely intelligent? Might we ourselves be biological machines, whose thought consists essentially in nothing more than the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Peter Millican (1998). Hume on Reason and Induction: Epistemology or Cognitive Science? Hume Studies 24 (1):141-159.
  46. A. Clark & Peter Millican (eds.) (1996). Connectionism, Concepts, and Folk Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    This is the second of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing; it celebrates his intellectual legacy within the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. A distinguished international cast of contributors focus on the relationship beteen a scientific, computational image of the mind and a common-sense picture of the mind as an inner arena populated by concepts, beliefs, intentions, and qualia. Topics covered include the causal potency of folk- psychological states, the connectionist reconception of learning and concept formation, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Peter Millican & A. Clark (eds.) (1996). Machines and Thought. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing, whose pioneering work in the theory of artificial intelligence and computer science ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Peter Millican & A. Clark (eds.) (1996). Machines and Thought, The Legacy of Alan Turing. Oup.
    This is the first of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing, whose pioneering work in the theory of artificial intelligence and computer science ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Peter Millican (1993). `Hume's Theorem' Concerning Miracles. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (173):489-495.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 57