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Peter Mott [12]Peter L. Mott [3]Peter D. Mott [1]
  1. Peter Mott (1998). Margins for Error and the Sorites Paradox. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):494-504.
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  2. Xuegang Wang & Peter Mott (1998). A Variant of Thomason's First-Order Logic CF Based on Situations. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 39 (1):74-93.
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  3. Peter Mott (1996). A Grammar-Based Approach to Common-Sense Reasoning. In P. J. R. Millican & A. Clark (eds.), Machines and Thought: The Legacy of Alan Turing, Volume 1. Clarendon Press.
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  4. Peter Mott (1995). Towards a Winograd/Flores Semantics. Minds and Machines 5 (1):69-87.
    A basic theme of Winograd and Flores (1986) is that the principal function of language is to co-ordinate social activity. It is, they claim, from this function that meaning itself arises. They criticise approaches that try to understand meaning through the mechanisms of reference, the Rationalist Tradition as they call it. To seek to ground meaning in social practice is not new, but the approach is presently attractive because of difficulties encountered with the notion of reference. Without taking a view (...)
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  5. Peter Mott (1994). On the Intuitionistic Solution of the Sorites Paradox. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75:133-150.
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  6. Peter Mott (1992). Fodor and Ceteris Paribus Laws. Mind 101 (402):335-46.
  7. Peter Mott (1992). The Representational Theory of Mind. An Introduction. Philosophical Books 33 (1):39-42.
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  8. Peter Mott (1992). The Situation in Logic (Center for the Study of Language and Information, Lecture Notes Number 17). Philosophical Books 31 (4):220-222.
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  9. Peter Mott (1990). Essentials of Symbolic Logic. Philosophical Books 31 (1):33-34.
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  10. Peter D. Mott (1990). The Elderly and High Technology Medicine: A Case for Individualized, Autonomous Allocation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).
    The issues involved in decision making about the aggressiveness of future medical care for older persons are explored. They are related to population trends, the heterogeneity of older persons and a variety of factors involved in individual preferences. Case studies are presented to illustrate these points, as well as a review of pertinent literature. The argument is offered that, considering these many factors, a system of flexible, individualized care by informed patient preference, is more rational than the rationing of technological (...)
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  11. Peter Mott (1988). Conditionals. Philosophical Books 29 (3):156-157.
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  12. Peter Mott (1982). On the Function of Consciousness. Mind 91 (July):423-9.
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  13. Peter L. Mott (1980). Haack on Fallibilism. Analysis 40 (4):177 - 183.
    I contend that s. Haack's proposed definition of fallibilism ("synthese" 1979) is unsatisfactory being equivalent to the assertion that we can believe anything. I say that fallibilism is best conceived as the doctrine that all our theories are (not could be) false.
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  14. Peter L. Mott (1978). Verisimilitude by Means of Short Theorems. Synthese 38 (2):247 - 273.
    This paper began with the simple object of finding an account that allowed us to compare incompatible false theories. This we achieved with ρ. But that relation is language — or interest — dependent. ρ' is free from this limitation; though thus liberated it is perhaps rather unconcerned about what is true, and further fails to deliver certain intuitive comparisons. Whether ρ is to be preferred to ρ' or vice versa, seems to me a largely fruitless question: In fact it (...)
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  15. Peter Mott (1973). Dates, Tenseless Verbs and Token-Reflexivity. Mind 82 (325):73-85.
  16. Peter L. Mott (1973). On Chisholm's Paradox. Journal of Philosophical Logic 2 (2):197 - 211.
    It has been maintained that we are quite able to express (1*)–(4*) without the introduction of a dyadic deontic operator, provided only that we supply our standard deontic logic with a stronger conditional than material implication. The lesson learned from Chisholm's paradox has been the eminently convincing, indeed obvious, one: that what we ought to do is not determined by what is the case in some perfect world, but by what is the case in the best world we can ‘get (...)
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