Search results for 'Peter R. King' (try it on Scholar)

325 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Peter R King (Nottingham University)
  1. R. B. King & D. H. Rouvray (2006). Response of D. H. Rouvray and R. B. King, Editors of the Book “the Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century”. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 8 (3):305-306.score: 480.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Nicholas King (2012). Discernment of Revelation in the Gospel of Matthew (Religions and Discourse Vol. 30). By Frances Shaw. Pp. 370, Bern, Peter Lang, 2007, $74.95. The 'Drama' of the Messiah in Matthew 8 and 9: A Study From a Communicative Perspective (European University Studies Series XXIII). By Solomon Pasala. Pp. Xx, 345, Bern, Peter Lang, 2008, $100.95. Biblical Interpretation in Early Christian Gospels. Vol. 2: The Gospel of Matthew. Edited by Thomas R. Hatina . Pp. Xx, 232, London, T & T Clark, 2008, $130.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (2):337-339.score: 390.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Peter R. King (2010). Perception, Hallucination, and Illusion. Philosophical Psychology 23 (5):715-719.score: 290.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Peter R. King (2009). B. Dainton: The Phenomenal Self. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 71 (2):283-288.score: 290.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lynne S. Arnault, Bat-Ami Bar On, Alyssa R. Bernstein, Victoria Davion, Marilyn Fischer, Virginia Held, Peter Higgins, Sabrina Hom, Audra King, James L. Nelson, Serena Parekh, April Shaw & Joan Tronto (2007). Global Feminist Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 270.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Peter King, The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus.score: 240.0
    [1] In twelve quite demanding chapters, outstanding scholars provide an overall view of the key issues of Scotus’s philosophical thought. To this a very concise introduction is added, concerning the life and works of John Duns (very good, especially the survey of works and the information on critical editions etc.). Throughout the book, I find the information clear and the difficult topics well explained. Moreover, the volume gives a quick entrance to the vast literature. Among the topics discussed are: ‘Metaphysics’ (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Peter King, Peter Abelard. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 240.0
    Peter Abelard (1079 – 21 April 1142) [‘Abailard’ or ‘Abaelard’ or ‘Habalaarz’ and so on] was the pre-eminent philosopher and theologian of the twelfth century. The teacher of his generation, he was also famous as a poet and a musician. Prior to the recovery of Aristotle, he brought the native Latin tradition in philosophy to its highest pitch. His genius was evident in all he did. He is, arguably, the greatest logician of the Middle Ages and is equally famous (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Klaus Jacobi, Christian Strub & Peter King (1996). From Intellectus Verus/Falsus to the Dictum Propositionis: The Semantics of Peter Abelard and His Circle. Vivarium 34 (1):15-40.score: 210.0
  9. Peter King (1996). From Intellectus Verus/Falsus to the Dictum Propositionis: The Semantics of Peter Abelard and His Circle. Vivarium 34 (1):15-40.score: 210.0
    In his commentary on Aristotle’s Peri hermeneias,1 Abelard distinguishes the form of an expression2 (oratio) from what it says, that is, its content. The content of an expression is its understanding (intellectus). This distinction is surely the most well-known and central idea in Abelard’s commentary. It provides him with the opportunity to distinguish statements (enuntiationes) from other kinds of expressions without implying a diference in their content, since the ability of a statement to signify something true or false (verum vel (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. R. A. H. King (2006). Lloyd (G.E.R.) Ancient Worlds, Modern Reflections . Pp. 240. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2004. Cased, £27.50, US$35.00. ISBN: 0-19-927016-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):237-.score: 210.0
  11. James L. Hyland, Teresa Iglesias, Peter J. King, Ciaran McGlynn, Jaime Nubiola, Brian O'Connor, Patrick Gorevan, Rachel Vaughan & Máire O'Neill (1994). Books Briefly Noted. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (1):173-179.score: 150.0
    Political Freedom By George G. Brenkert Routledge, 1991. Pp. 278. ISBN 0?415?03372?1. £35 hbk. Wittgenstein: A Bibliographical Guide By Guido Frongia and Brian McGuinness Basil Blackwell, 1990. Pp. x + 438. ISBN 00631?13765?3. £60.00. Metaphysics By Peter van Inwagen Oxford University Press, 1993. Pp. xiii + 222. ISBN 0?19?8751400. £11.95 pbk. The Nature of Moral Thinking By Francis Snare Routledge, 1992. Pp. 187. ISBN 0?415?04709?9. £9.99 pbk. Filosofía analitica hoy: Encuentro de tradiciones Edited by Mercedes Torrevejano Servicio de Publications (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Daniel King (2003). Cartesian Dualism, and the Universe as Turing Machine. Philosophy Today 47 (2):138-146.score: 150.0
    In the field of computability and algorithmicity, there have recently been two essays that are of great interest: Peter Slezak's "Descartes's Diagonal Deduction," and David Deutsch's "Quantum Theory, the Church-Turing Principle and the Universal Quantum Computer." In brief, the former shows that Descartes' Cogito argument is structurally similar to Godel's proof that there are statements true but cannot be proven within a formal system such as Principia Mathematica, while Deutsch provides strong arguments for believing that the universe can be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gerald R. Ferris & Thomas R. King (1992). The Politics of Age Discrimination in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (5-6):341-350.score: 140.0
    Age discrimination, particularly in the context of performance evaluation decisions, has been a source of major concern and litigation for organizations in the past, and indications are that this area will pose serious challenges in the future. The present study attempted to delve more deeply into the process by which manifest age discrimination operates in the performance evaluation process. A conceptualization was proposed and tested which suggested that age-related influences on performance ratings operate through interpersonal distance and political influence of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robert R. King & Kay Atkinson King (1972). The Effect of Mormon Organizational Boundaries on Group Cohesion. Social Research 56:494-512.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. M. R. Hyman & C. W. King (forthcoming). The Geographically Mobile Consumer: A Conceptual Framework for Retail Management and Patronage Theory Development. Patronage Behavior and Retail Management Conference Proceedings.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David L. Strayer, John A. Downing, Wendell R. Haag, Timothy L. King, James B. Layzer, Teresa J. Newton & S. Jerrine Nichols (2004). Changing Perspectives on Pearly Mussels, North America's Most Imperiled Animals. Bioscience 54 (5):429.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. David L. Strayer, John A. Downing, Wendell R. Haag, Timothy L. King, James B. Layzer, Teresa J. Newton & Jerrine S. Nichols (2004). Changing Perspectives on Pearly Mussels, North America's Most Imperiled Animals. Bioscience 54 (5):429-439.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David R. Thomas & Richard A. King (1959). Stimulus Generalization as a Function of Level of Motivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (5):323.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Peter J. King (2008). No Plaything: Ethical Issues Concerning Child-Pornography. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):327 - 345.score: 120.0
    Academic discussion of pornography is generally restricted to issues arising from the depiction of adults. I argue that child-pornography is a more complex matter, and that generally accepted moral judgements concerning pornography in general have to be revised when children are involved. I look at the question of harm to the children involved, the consumers, and society in general, at the question of blame, and at the possibility of a morally acceptable form of child-pornography. My approach involves an objectivist meta-ethics (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Peter King (2005). Why Isn't the Mind-Body Problem Medieval? In , Forming the Mind. Springer-Verlag.score: 120.0
    One answer: Because medieval philosophy is just the continuation of ancient philosophy by other means—the Latin language and the Catholic Church— and, as Wallace Matson pointed out some time ago, the mind-body problem isn’t ancient.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Peter King, The History of Logic.score: 120.0
    Aristotle was the first thinker to devise a logical system. He drew upon the emphasis on universal definition found in Socrates, the use of reductio ad absurdum in Zeno of Elea, claims about propositional structure and negation in Parmenides and Plato, and the body of argumentative techniques found in legal reasoning and geometrical proof. Yet the theory presented in Aristotle’s five treatises known as the Organon—the Categories, the De interpretatione, the Prior Analytics, the Posterior Analytics, and the Sophistical Refutations—goes far (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peter King, Duns Scotus on Singular Essences.score: 120.0
    Socrates, for example, has an essence that includes more than his human nature, which is his specific essence; he has an essence proper to himself alone, an essence that cannot be had by anyone else. Although Socrates does have singular (individualized) forms, his singular essence is not a form—there is no form Socrateity for the singular essence parallelling the form humanity for the specific essence. Instead, Socrates has his singular essence in consequence of being an individual, that is, in consequence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Peter King (2003). Parapsychology Without the 'Para' (or the Psychology). Think 3 (3):43-54.score: 120.0
    possible, your investigation is unlikely ever to get off the ground), there’s no such excuse for philosophers. The philosopher should be unrestricted by fashions in thought, including the unquestioning acceptance of whatever scientific theories are currently dominant. The fact is, however, that in this field and in the philosophy of mind, many.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Matt King & Peter Carruthers (2012). Moral Responsibility and Consciousness. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):200-228.score: 120.0
    Our aim in this paper is to raise a question about the relationship between theories of responsibility, on the one hand, and a commitment to conscious attitudes, on the other. Our question has rarely been raised previously. Among those who believe in the reality of human freedom, compatibilists have traditionally devoted their energies to providing an account that can avoid any commitment to the falsity of determinism while successfully accommodating a range of intuitive examples. Libertarians, in contrast, have aimed to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Peter King (2010). Mediaeval Intentionality and Pseudo-Intentionality. Quaestio 10 (1):25-44.score: 120.0
  26. Hugh R. King (1951). Professor Ryle and the Concept of Mind. Journal of Philosophy 48 (April):280-296.score: 120.0
  27. Peter King, Scotus's Rejection of Anselm.score: 120.0
    stance, Scotus adopts Anselm’s notion of a ‘(pure) perfection’ and elevates it to a fundamental principle of his metaphysics. Again, he distills Anselm’s Ontological Argument into something like its original Monologion components, and then treats each component part of the argument with a rigor and attention to detail far beyond anything Anselm suggested. In the case of Anselm’s so-called ‘two-wills’ theory, however, Scotus’s revisions are so extensive that they amount to a rejection of Anselm’s account, even though Scotus retains some (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Peter King & Nathan Ballantyne (2009). Augustine on Testimony. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):pp. 195-214.score: 120.0
  29. Peter King, Did Marx Hold a Labor Theory of Value?score: 120.0
    In the first volume of Capital, Marx introduces a labor theory of value. The theory is supposed to form the basis of his “laying bare” the “inner workings” of capitalism. The theory rests on two claims, and at the outset Marx uses it to explain four features of capitalist production. Yet by the end of the final volume of Capital, he abandons both claims and offers alternative accounts of all four features of capitalism. We hold that Marx’s introduction of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Peter King, Angelic Sin in Augustine and Anselm.score: 120.0
    Augustine and Anselm form a common tradition in mediæval thought about angelic sin, a tradition rooted in patristic thought and centred on their attempts to give a philosophically coherent account of moral choice. Augustine concentrates on the reasons and causes of angelic sin, especially in reference to free will; Anselm adopts Augustine’s analysis and extends it to issues about the rationality of sinful choice. Each takes Lucifer’s primal sin to be the paradigm case. Lucifer, undistracted by bodily desires and unencumbered (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Peter King, Boethius: The First of the Scholastics.score: 120.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Peter King, Buridan's Theory of Individuation.score: 120.0
    cause other than the very individual itself, and thus there is no ‘metaphysical’ problem of individuation at all—individuality, unlike generality, is primitive and needs no explanation. He supports this view in two ways. First, he argues that there are no nonindividual entities, whether existing in their own right or as metaphysical constituents either of things or in things, and hence that no real principle or cause of individuality (other than the individual itself) is required. Second, he offers a ‘semantic’ interpretation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Peter J. King (1993). Lycan on Lewis and Meinong. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93:193 - 201.score: 120.0
    In his 1988 review of On the Plurality of Worlds (Lycan [1988]), William Lycan argued that what he called Lewis's 'mad-dog modal realism' (also 'rape-and-loot modal realism' and 'nuclear-holocaust modal realism' - I suspect that some reference to the supposed extremity of Lewis's position is intended) rested upon an unanalysed modal notion. Lycan accepted that actualists all seemed to be stuck with such unanalysed notions (adding that his own was the notion of compatibility as applied to pairs of properties), but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Peter King (2009). Emotion in Medieval Thought. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Peter King, William of Ockham: Ordinatio 1 D. 2 Q.score: 120.0
    That it is: According to the Commentator, Met. 7 com. 11 ([Iuntina 8 fol. 76r]): The definition is the same as the substance of the thing. Hence it is in some way outside the soul, and consequently all its parts are in some way outside the soul. But the definition is composed of universals. Hence [the universal is outside the soul].
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Peter King (1994). Against Tolerance. Philosophy Now 11:23-24.score: 120.0
    I frequently have trouble with words that other people use with what seems to be blithe understanding (friends tell me that the problem is that I think too much about words, but I find that not thinking doesn't really seem to help). In the case of `tolerance', though, I have no trouble at all - it's a wishy-washy weasel, a mealy-mouthed mink of a word. I suppose I don't want to claim that it has no decent place in the language (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Peter King (2007). Damaged Goods. Faith and Philosophy 24 (3):247-267.score: 120.0
    The Doctrine of Original Sin seems to require that human nature has literally undergone a change from its prelapsarian to its postlapsarian condition.It is not clear that this claim makes sense. How can human nature, the feature(s) in virtue of which human beings are what they are, change in time? (Think of the parallel claim about √2.) I consider three medieval attempts to resolve this problem: (1) Augustine’s two theories about shared human nature; (2) Anselm’s proposal that original sin is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Peter King, Siger of Brabant: The Eternity of the World.score: 120.0
    phers] to be a demonstration of the fact that the human species (and in every case the species of all generable and corruptible individuals) began to exist at a time when previously it had not existed at all, a question is raised: whether, following the Philosopher’s method, the human species (and in every case any given species of generable and corruptible [individuals]) began to exist at a time when previously it had not existed at all.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Peter King, Thinking About Things: Singular Thought in the Middle Ages.score: 120.0
    In one corner Socrates; in the other, on the mat, his cat Felix. Socrates, of course, thinks (correctly) that Felix the Cat is on the mat. But there’s the rub. For Socrates to think that Felix is on the mat, he has to be able to think about Felix, that is, he has to have some sort of cognitive grasp of an individual — and not just any individual, but Felix himself. How is that possible? What is going on when (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. R. A. H. King (2011). Late Antique Epistemology. Other Ways to Truth. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (1):195-197.score: 120.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Peter King, Readings in African Philosophy.score: 120.0
    Some years ago I reviewed a collection of papers called African Philosophy: The Essential Readings , edited by Serequeberhan. My last comment in that review was the expression of the hope for collections of papers that would give an insight into what's going on in African philosophy, rather than into the debate over the existence and nature of African philosophy. My concern is echoed by the last line of a letter printed in the present volume of readings: "Hitherto most of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Peter Higgins, Audra King & April Shaw (2008). What is Poverty? In Rebecca Whisnant & Peggy DesAutels (eds.), Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 120.0
    Invoking three desiderata (empirical adequacy, conceptual precision, and sensitivity to social positioning), this paper argues that poverty is best understood as the deprivation of certain human capabilities. It defends this way of conceiving of poverty against standard alternatives: lack of income, lack of resources, inequality, and social exclusion.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Peter King, Abelard on Mental.score: 120.0
    Augustine and Anselm, Abelard was not concerned to explore the theological dimension of the mental Word. Instead, Abelard crafted a ‘language of thought’ to provide the semantics for ordinary languages, based on the idea that thoughts (intellectus) have linguistic character. His is the most sophisticated account of Mental Language until the efforts of Burleigh, Ockham, Buridan, and others at the start of the fourteenth century. Yet unlike these later versions, Abelard’s theory of Mental Language has not received the attention it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Peter King (2009). Abelard's Answers to Porphyry. Documenti E Studi 18:249-270.score: 120.0
    Mox de generibus et speciebus illud quidem siue subsistant siue in solis nudis purisque intellectibus posita sint siue ipsa subsistentia sint corporalia an incorporalia, et utrum separata an in sensibilibus et circa ea constantia, dicere recusabo. As regards genera and species, for the present I shall refuse to say whether they subsist or are postulated in understandings that are alone and bare and pure; or whether, if they subsist, they are corporeal or incorporeal; and whether they are separated from sensibles (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Peter King (2001). John Buridan's Solution to the Problem of Universals. In J. M. M. H. Thijssen & Jack Zupko (eds.), The Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy of John Buridan. Brill. 1--27.score: 120.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Hugh R. King (1949). Aristotle and the Paradoxes of Zeno. Journal of Philosophy 46 (21):657-670.score: 120.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Peter King, A (Very) Little About Me.score: 120.0
    I was born in Boston, Lincolnshire (actually in Wyberton West Hospital, which no longer exists), educated (if that's the word) first at St Mary's Primary School (run by nuns at the time, which probably explains a lot about my later career if you're a Freudian, which I'm not. Its new incarnation is here), then at Boston Grammar School . At the latter I successfully navigated 'O'-levels, but nearly half-way through my 'A'-levels I developed a number of extra-curricular interests which distracted (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Peter King (2003). Two Conceptions of Experience. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (02):203-226.score: 120.0
  49. Peter King, The Limits of Creation.score: 120.0
    Novelists and other producers of fiction can make many mistakes (including becoming novelists and other producers of fiction), but there are three kinds of mistake that stem from the writer's ignorance. First, there's the purely external mistake, which occurs in the..
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 325