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Peter S. Wenz [43]Peter Samuel Wenz [1]
  1. Peter S. Wenz (1989). Environmental Justice. Ethics 100 (1):197-198.
     
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  2.  28
    Peter S. Wenz (1993). Minimal, Moderate, and Extreme Moral Pluralism. Environmental Ethics 15 (1):61-74.
    Concentrating on the views of Christopher Stone, who advocates moral pluralism, and J. Baird Callicott, who criticizes Stone’s views, I argue that the debate has been confused by a conflation of three different positions, here called minimal, moderate, and extreme moral pluralism. Minimal pluralism is uncontroversial because all known moral theories are minimally pluralistic. Extreme pluralism is defective in the ways that Callicott alleges and, moreover, is inconsistent with integrity in the moral life. However, moderate pluralism of the sort that (...)
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  3. Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin (2002). Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Democracy and the Claims of Nature, the leading thinkers in the fields of environmental, political, and social theory come together to discuss the tensions and sympathies of democratic ideals and environmental values. The prominent contributors reflect upon where we stand in our understanding of the relationship between democracy and the claims of nature. Democracy and the Claims of Nature bridges the gap between the often competing ideals of the two fields, leading to a greater understanding of each for the (...)
     
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  4. Hussein M. Adam, Elizabeth Bell, Robert D. Bullard, Robert Melchior Figueroa, Clarice E. Gaylord, Segun Gbadegesin, R. J. A. Goodland, Howard McCurdy, Charles Mills, Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Peter S. Wenz & Daniel C. Wigley (2001). Faces of Environmental Racism: Confronting Issues of Global Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  5. Peter S. Wenz (2001). Environmental Ethics Today. OUP Usa.
    In this book, Peter Wenz addresses the major issues and thinkers in environmental ethics. His style is accessible, even journalistic at times, featuring current facts, real controversies, and a vivid narrative, while preserving rigorous philosophical content.theories and methods are introduced, not for their own sake, but to help the reader understand and solve environmental problems.
     
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  6.  22
    Peter S. Wenz (1986). The Critique of Berkeley's Empiricism In Orwell's 1984. Idealistic Studies 16 (2):133-152.
  7. Hussein M. Adam, Elizabeth Bell, Robert D. Bullard, Robert Melchior Figueroa, Clarice E. Gaylord, Segun Gbadegesin, R. J. A. Goodland, Howard McCurdy, Charles Mills, Dr Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Peter S. Wenz & Daniel C. Wigley (2001). Faces of Environmental Racism: Confronting Issues of Global Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Through case studies that highlight the type of information that is seldom reported in the news, Faces of Environmental Racism exposes the type and magnitude of environmental racism, both domestic and international. The essays explore the justice of current environmental practices, asking such questions as whether cost-benefit analysis is an appropriate analytic technique and whether there are alternate routes to sustainable development in the South.
     
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  8.  10
    Peter S. Wenz (1999). Pragmatism in Practice: The Efficiency of Sustainable Agriculture. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):391-410.
    Bryan Norton advocates using the perspectives and methods of American pragmatism in environmental philosophy. J. Baird Callicott criticizes Norton’s view as unproductive anti-philosophy. I find worth and deficiencies in both sides. On the one hand, I support the pragmatic approach, illustrating its use in an argument for sustainable agriculture. On the other hand, I take issue with Norton’s claim that pragmatists should confine themselves to anthrpocentric arguments. Here I agree with Callicott’s inclusion of nonanthropocentric consideration. However, I reject Callicott’s moral (...)
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  9. Peter S. Wenz (2010). Just Garbage. In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  10. Peter S. Wenz (1999). Wrongness, Wisdom, and Wilderness: Toward a Libertarian Theory of Ethics and the Environment. Environmental Ethics 21 (1):105-108.
     
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  11.  30
    Peter S. Wenz (1979). The Incompatibility of Act-Utilitarianism with Moral Integrity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):547-553.
    Bernard williams' monograph in "utilitarianism: for and against" contains an argument that utilitarianism is incompatible with personal integrity. though his argument is fatally flawed, its conclusion is supported in the present paper, which argues that the act utilitarianism (au) defended by j j c smart in "utilitarianism: for and against" tends to deprive its adherents of moral integrity. after briefly reviewing smart's version of au, i recount williams' argument and carr's reply concerning a link between au and a loss of (...)
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  12.  6
    Peter S. Wenz (2000). Environmental Justice Through Improved Efficiency. Environmental Values 9 (2):173 - 188.
    Environmentalists can convince others to adopt nature-friendly policies through appeal to commonly-held values. Efficiency and justice are such values in industrial societies, but these values are often considered at odds with each other and with policies that preserve land and reduce pollution. The present paper analyses the notion of efficiency and argues that transportation policies that environmentalists favour – substitution of intercity rail and urban mass transit for most automotive forms of transport – are both efficient and just.
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  13.  28
    Peter S. Wenz (1993). Alternate Foundations for the Land Ethic: Biologism, Cognitivism, and Pragmatism. Topoi 12 (1):53-67.
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  14.  7
    Peter S. Wenz (2003). Environmental Philosophy: Reason, Nature, and Human Concern. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):317-320.
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  15.  16
    Peter S. Wenz (1997). Environmental Pragmatism. Environmental Ethics 19 (3):327-330.
    Wenz reviews "Environmental Pragmatism" edited by Andrew Light and Eric Katz.
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  16.  20
    Peter S. Wenz (2003). Leopold's Novel: The Land Ethic in Barbara Kingsolver's Prodigal Summer. Ethics and the Environment 8 (2):106 - 125.
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  17. Peter S. Wenz (1976). Berkeley's Christian Neo-Platonism. Journal of the History of Ideas 37 (3):537.
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  18.  8
    Peter S. Wenz (2000). Justice for Here and Now. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):311-314.
  19.  13
    Peter S. Wenz (2002). Environmental Synergism. Environmental Ethics 24 (4):389-408.
    Some anthropocentrists, such as Bryan Norton, claim that intergenerational anthropocentrism provides the best rationale for protecting biodiversity. Some nonanthropocentrists, such as J. Baird Callicott and Eric Katz, disagree. In the present paper, I analyze different varieties of anthropocentrism, argue for adopting what is here called multicultural anthropocentrism, and then advance the following thesis of environmental synergism: combining multicultural anthropocentrism with nonanthropocentrism enables synergists to argue more cogently and effectively than either anthropocentrists or previous nonanthropocentrists for policies that both protect biodiversity (...)
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  20.  12
    Peter S. Wenz (1997). Environmental Pragmatism. Environmental Ethics 19 (3):327-330.
    Wenz reviews "Environmental Pragmatism" edited by Andrew Light and Eric Katz.
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  21.  5
    Peter S. Wenz (1997). Caring for Creation. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):141-142.
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  22.  9
    Peter S. Wenz (1993). Contracts, Animals, and Ecosystems. Social Theory and Practice 19 (3):315-344.
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  23.  5
    Peter S. Wenz (2000). Peacemaking in Practice: A Response to Jim Sterba. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):441-442.
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  24.  9
    Peter S. Wenz (2003). Leopold's Novel: The Land Ethic in Barbara Kingsolver's. Ethics and the Environment 8 (2).
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  25.  6
    Peter S. Wenz (2007). Against Cruelty to Animals. Social Theory and Practice 33 (1):127-150.
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  26.  3
    Peter S. Wenz (1999). Pragmatism in Practice. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):391-410.
    Bryan Norton advocates using the perspectives and methods of American pragmatism in environmental philosophy. J. Baird Callicott criticizes Norton’s view as unproductive anti-philosophy. I find worth and deficiencies in both sides. On the one hand, I support the pragmatic approach, illustrating its use in an argument for sustainable agriculture. On the other hand, I take issue with Norton’s claim that pragmatists should confine themselves to anthrpocentric arguments. Here I agree with Callicott’s inclusion of nonanthropocentric consideration. However, I reject Callicott’s moral (...)
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  27.  6
    Peter S. Wenz (2007). Against Cruelty to Animals. Social Theory and Practice 33 (1):127-150.
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  28.  7
    Peter S. Wenz (1989). Book Review:Environmental Ethics: Duties to and Values in the Natural World. Holmes Rolston III. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (1):195-.
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  29.  2
    Peter S. Wenz (1989). Treating Animals Naturally. Between the Species 5 (1):3.
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  30.  6
    Peter S. Wenz (1983). Book Review:Evolution, Morality and the Meaning of Life. Jeffrie G. Murphy. [REVIEW] Ethics 94 (1):140-.
  31.  1
    Peter S. Wenz (1989). Concentric Circle Pluralism: A Response to Rolston. Between the Species 5 (3):9.
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  32.  4
    Peter S. Wenz (1986). Conservatism and Conservation. Philosophy 61 (238):503 - 512.
    Utilitarians believe that personal decisions and public policies should be made so as to maximize the public good, or, as Jeremy Bentham put it, to produce the greatest good of the greatest number. Bentham identified the public good with the maximization of happiness, and believed that many traditional practices were inimical to the production of happiness. So in the name of maximizing the public good, Bentham advocated, for example, extending the franchise, reforming the criminal code and re-designing prisons. People's prejudices (...)
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  33.  1
    Peter S. Wenz (1982). Berkeley's Two Concepts of Impossibility: A Reply to Mckim. Journal of the History of Ideas 43 (4):673.
    In my paper, "berkeley's christian neo-Platonism" ("journal of the history of ideas", July, 1976) I had maintained that george berkeley was a christian neo-Platonist who believed that abstract ideas exist in the mind of god, And that God used these ideas as archetypes during creation. Robert mckim commented that berkeley considered abstract ideas to be logical impossibilities, And therefore did not believe them to exist in god's mind. My reply is that berkeley employs two different concepts of impossibility for two (...)
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  34.  1
    Peter S. Wenz (1999). [Book Review] Nature's Keeper. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 25 (1):149-154.
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  35. Peter S. Wenz (1979). Act-Utilitarianism and Animal Liberation. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 60 (4):423.
     
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  36. Peter S. Wenz, An Ecological Argument for Vegetarianism.
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  37. Peter S. Wenz, Article Review of The Nature and Possibility of an Environmental Ethic, Environmental Ethics.
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  38. Peter S. Wenz (1988). Books Received. [REVIEW] Philosophical Forum:317.
     
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  39.  1
    Peter S. Wenz (2009). Beyond Red and Blue: How Twelve Political Philosophies Shape American Debates. The MIT Press.
    On any given night cable TV news will tell us how polarized American politics is: Republicans are from Mars, Democrats are from Canada. But in fact, writes Peter Wenz in _Beyond Red and Blue_, Americans do not divide neatly into two ideological camps of red/blue, Republican/Democrat, right/left. In real life, as Wenz shows, different ideologies can converge on certain issues; people from the right and left can support the same policy for different reasons. Thus, for example, libertarian-leaning Republicans can oppose (...)
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  40. Peter S. Wenz (2012). Beyond Red and Blue: How Twelve Political Philosophies Shape American Debates. The MIT Press.
    On any given night cable TV news will tell us how polarized American politics is: Republicans are from Mars, Democrats are from Canada. But in fact, writes Peter Wenz in _Beyond Red and Blue_, Americans do not divide neatly into two ideological camps of red/blue, Republican/Democrat, right/left. In real life, as Wenz shows, different ideologies can converge on certain issues; people from the right and left can support the same policy for different reasons. Thus, for example, libertarian-leaning Republicans can oppose (...)
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  41. Peter S. Wenz (1981). Human Equality in Sports. Philosophical Forum 12 (3):238.
     
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  42. Peter S. Wenz (2003). Leopold's Novel:The Land Ethic in Barbara Kingsolver'sprodigal Summer. Ethics and the Environment 8 (2):106-125.
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  43. Peter S. Wenz (2012). Take Back the Center: Progressive Taxation for a New Progressive Agenda. The MIT Press.
    Midcentury America was governed from the center, a bipartisan consensus of politicians and public opinion that supported government spending on education, the construction of a vast network of interstate highways, healthcare for senior citizens, and environmental protection. These projects were paid for by a steeply progressive tax code, with a top tax rate at one point during the Republican Eisenhower administration of 91 percent. Today, a similar agenda of government action would be portrayed as dangerously left wing. At the same (...)
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