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  1. Peter Sells, Optimality and Economy of Expression in Japanese and Korean.
    In this paper I will discuss certain cases in Japanese and Korean morphosyntax where forms compete to express the same semantic and grammatical information, and attempt to show that in each instance the most economical form is chosen. Presenting an account in terms of Optimality Theory (OT; see Prince and Smolensky (1993), Grimshaw (1995)), I will argue that constraints such as ‘Avoid Word’ and ‘Avoid Affix’ (as in (1)) are motivated as the forces behind the economization. (1) Avoid Word, Avoid (...)
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  2. Peter Sells, Case Assignment in the Clause on Adjuncts.
    It is well-known that the domain of case assignment extends beyond the arguments of a predicate to a range of adverbials in some languages, including Korean. In this paper we concentrate on case-marked Duration/Frequency adverbials which are characterized as ‘extensive measures’ by Wechsler and Lee (1996).∗ In some languages, case-marked adverbials are in the accusative and provide a boundedness to an event (cf. Kuryłowicz (1964), Kiparsky (1998), Kratzer (2004)). However, in Korean, the D/F adverbials can show accusative or nominative, with (...)
     
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  3. Peter Sells, Constituent Ordering as Alignment.
    In Optimality Theory (OT), recent work has been exploring the idea that the order of constituents in syntax is determined by alignment constraints, developed within the theory of Generalized Alignment (see McCarthy and Prince (1993)). Costa (1998) and Samek-Lodovici (1998) present general overviews, and both have specifically argued that OT analyses are superior to proposals expressed in terms of the parameterized “directionality” of movement or ordering. In Korean, the ordering options for major clausal constituents have been explored in Choi (...)
     
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  4. Peter Sells, Contrastive Verb Constructions in Korean.
    This paper addresses the correct analysis of Korean examples like those in (1).∗ An event is presented against a contrastive or negative implication, through either a copy of the verbal lexeme, or the use of the supporting verb ha-ta.
     
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  5. Peter Sells, Negative Imperatives in Korean.
    Like many languages, Korean has a special form of negation that is used in imperative clauses (see (1)c), to the exclusion of the usual clausal negation in (1)b: (1) a. ka-la b. *ka-ci anh-ala c. ka-ci mal-ala go-Imp go-Comp Neg-Imp go-Comp Neg-Imp ‘Don’t go!’ ‘Don’t go!’ ‘Go!’ Sadock and Zwicky (1985) noted that negation in imperative(-like) clauses shows special morpho-syntax in many languages, a fact documented in more detail by Zanuttini (1997) or Han (2000). In this paper I will consider (...)
     
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  6. Peter Sells, Positional Constraints and Faithfulness in Morphology.
    While the copula in Korean may attach to various consituents built around nominal hosts, it is not totally unconstrained as to the nature of its host. In particular, there are some post-nominal particles with which it cannot co-occur. Based on the classification of Yang (1972), and following much other work, Cho and Sells (1995) adopt the well-known template in (3) for the nominal system, with each position exemplified by (...)
     
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  7. Peter Sells, Three Aspects of Negation in Korean.
    Studies 6, 1–15. Korean has three forms that express negation: short-form negation, long-form negation and inherently lexical verbs. The goal of this paper is to argue that there are three separate notions related to the expression and interpretation of negation in Korean, which must be kept separate. They are the notions of a negative clause, of the surface c-command domain of a negative element, and of the semantic scope of a negative element. The main arguments derive from the interactions of (...)
     
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  8. Peter Sells, The INPUT and Faithfulness in OT Syntax.
    I consider some of the claims that have been made for and against the nature of the INPUT in OT syntax as developed within the assumptions of the Minimalist Program, leading to suggestions for further specification of the architecture of this approach. Comparing with the role of faithfulness in the OT approach developed from Lexical-Functional Grammar, I argue that specific linguistic analyses crucially involve reference to faithfulness constraints (MAX and DEP in correspondence-based OT) which apply across different parts of the (...)
     
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  9. Peter Sells (1991). Disjoint Reference Into NP. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (2):151 - 169.
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  10. Peter Sells (1987). Binding Resumptive Pronouns. Linguistics and Philosophy 10 (3):261 - 298.
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