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  1. Peter Turney, Answering Subcognitive Turing Test Questions: A Reply to French.
    Robert French has argued that a disembodied computer is incapable of passing a Turing Test that includes subcognitive questions. Subcognitive questions are designed to probe the network of cultural and perceptual associations that humans naturally develop as we live, embodied and embedded in the world. In this paper, I show how it is possible for a disembodied computer to answer subcognitive questions appropriately, contrary to French’s claim. My approach to answering subcognitive questions is to use statistical information extracted from (...)
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  2. Peter Turney (1999). The Curving Fitting Problem: A Solution. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41:509-530.
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  3. Peter Turney (1991). A Note on Popper's Equation of Simplicity with Falsifiability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (1):105-109.
    Karl Popper equates simplicity with falsifiability. He develops his argument for this equation through a geometrical example. There is a flaw in his example, which undermines his claim that simplicity is falsifiability. I point out the flaw here.
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  4. Peter Turney (1990). Embeddability, Syntax, and Semantics in Accounts of Scientific Theories. Journal of Philosophical Logic 19 (4):429 - 451.
    Recently several philosophers of science have proposed what has come to be known as the semantic account of scientific theories. It is presented as an improvement on the positivist account, which is now called the syntactic account of scientific theories. Bas van Fraassen claims that the syntactic account does not give a satisfactory definition of "empirical adequacy" and "empirical equivalence". He contends that his own semantic account does define these notations acceptably, through the concept of "embeddability", a concept which he (...)
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  5. Peter Turney (1990). The Curve Fitting Problem: A Solution. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (4):509-530.
    Much of scientific inference involves fitting numerical data with a curve, or functional relation. The received view is that the fittest curve is the curve which best balances the conflicting demands of simplicity and accuracy, where simplicity is measured by the number ofparameters in the curve. The problem with this view is that there is no commonly accepted justification for desiring simplicity. This paper presents a measure of the stability of equations. It is argued that the fittest curve is the (...)
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  6. Peter Turney (1989). The Architecture of Complexity: A New Blueprint. Synthese 79 (3):515 - 542.
    The logic of scientific discovery is now a concern of computer scientists, as well as philosophers. In the computational approach to inductive inference, theories are treated as algorithms (computer programs), and the goal is to find the simplest algorithm that can generate the given data. Both computer scientists and philosophers want a measure of simplicity, such that simple theories are more likely to be true than complex theories. I attempt to provide such a measure here. I define a measure of (...)
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  7. Peter Turney (1986). Arne Naess, A Sceptical Dialogue on Induction Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (1):11-12.
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