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Peter S. Wenz [33]Peter Wenz [9]
  1. Peter S. Wenz (2012). Take Back the Center: Progressive Taxation for a New Progressive Agenda. The Mit Press.
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  2. Peter S. Wenz (2010). Just Garbage. In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  3. Spencer Abraham, Ray Anderson, Nik Ansell, St Thomas Aquinas, St Francis of Assisi, William Baxter, Philip J. Bentley, Joachim Blatter, Murray Bookchin, Maya Brennan, Majora Carter, Carl Cohen, Deane Curtin, Herman Daly, David DeGrazia, Bill Devall, Calvin DeWitt, David Ehrenfeld, Paul, Anne Ehrlich, Robert Elliot, Stuart Ewen, Nuria Fernandez, Stephen Gardiner, Ramachandra Guha, Garrett Hardin, Eugene Hargrove, John Hasse, Po-Keung Ip, Ralf Isenmann, Kauser Jahan, Marianne B. Karsh, Andrew Kernohan, Marti Kheel, Kenneth Kraft, Aldo Leopold, Miriam MacGillis, Juan Martinez-Alier, Ed McGaa, Katie McShane, Roberto Mechoso, Arne Naess, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Michael Nelson, Bryan Norton, Philip Nyhus, John O'Neil, Stephen Pacala, Ernest Partridge, Erv Peterson, Tom Regan, Holmes Rolston Iii, Lily-Marlene Russow, Mark Sagoff, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Erroll Schweizer, George Sessions, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Stephen Socolow, Paul Steidlmeier, Richard Sylvan, Bron Taylor & Paul Taylor (2009). Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  4. Peter S. Wenz (2009). Beyond Red and Blue: How Twelve Political Philosophies Shape American Debates. The Mit Press.
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  5. Peter Wenz (2007). Review of Ronald L. Sandler, Character and Environment: A Virtue-Oriented Approach to Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (12).
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  6. Peter S. Wenz (2007). Against Cruelty to Animals. Social Theory and Practice 33 (1):127-150.
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  7. Peter Wenz (2005). Engineering Genetic Injustice. Bioethics 19 (1):1–11.
    In their jointly written book, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice, Allen Buchanan, Dan Brock, Norman Daniels and Daniel Wikler defend ’the development and deployment of genetic intervention technologies?.?.?.’, including genetic enhancements, against charges that they exacerbate injustice. The present paper examines some of their arguments. The first section shows that the authors confuse real societies with just societies. The second shows that without this confusion, their arguments reveal the enormous justice-impairing potential of deploying genetic enhancements in such societies (...)
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  8. Peter Wenz (2005). Synergistic Environmental Virtues: Consumerism and Human Flourishing. In R. Sandler & P. Cafaro (eds.), Environmental Virtue Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield. 197--213.
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  9. Peter S. Wenz (2003). Leopold's Novel: The Land Ethic in Barbara Kingsolver's Prodigal Summer. Ethics and the Environment 8 (2):106 - 125.
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  10. Peter S. Wenz (2003). Environmental Philosophy: Reason, Nature, and Human Concern. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):317-320.
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  11. Peter S. Wenz (2003). Leopold's Novel: The Land Ethic in Barbara Kingsolver's. Ethics and the Environment 8 (2).
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  12. Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin (2002). Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  13. Peter S. Wenz (2002). Environmental Synergism. Environmental Ethics 24 (4):389-408.
    Some anthropocentrists, such as Bryan Norton, claim that intergenerational anthropocentrism provides the best rationale for protecting biodiversity. Some nonanthropocentrists, such as J. Baird Callicott and Eric Katz, disagree. In the present paper, I analyze different varieties of anthropocentrism, argue for adopting what is here called multicultural anthropocentrism, and then advance the following thesis of environmental synergism: combining multicultural anthropocentrism with nonanthropocentrism enables synergists to argue more cogently and effectively than either anthropocentrists or previous nonanthropocentrists for policies that both protect biodiversity (...)
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  14. Hussein M. Adam, Elizabeth Bell, Robert D. Bullard, Robert Melchior Figueroa, Clarice E. Gaylord, Segun Gbadegesin, R. J. A. Goodland, Howard McCurdy, Charles Mills, Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Peter S. Wenz & Daniel C. Wigley (2001). Faces of Environmental Racism: Confronting Issues of Global Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  15. Jim Sterba & Peter Wenz (2001). Peacemaking Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):112-112.
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  16. Peter Wenz (2001). Peacemaking Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):112-112.
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  17. Peter S. Wenz (2001). Environmental Ethics Today. OUP USA.
    The world's economy expands, food production increases, and technology links people as never before. But the human population grows, rainforests decline, species become extinct, climate change threatens extreme weather, cancer kills more than ever, and nearly a billion people starve as the gap between rich and poor widens. Environmental Ethics Today addresses these matters by exploring beliefs of fact and value guiding human interactions with nature. The style is journalistic, featuring actual controversies and individual stories, but the content is philosophically (...)
     
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  18. Peter S. Wenz (2000). Environmental Justice Through Improved Efficiency. Environmental Values 9 (2):173 - 188.
    Environmentalists can convince others to adopt nature-friendly policies through appeal to commonly-held values. Efficiency and justice are such values in industrial societies, but these values are often considered at odds with each other and with policies that preserve land and reduce pollution. The present paper analyses the notion of efficiency and argues that transportation policies that environmentalists favour – substitution of intercity rail and urban mass transit for most automotive forms of transport – are both efficient and just.
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  19. Peter S. Wenz (2000). Justice for Here and Now. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):311-314.
  20. Peter S. Wenz (2000). Peacemaking in Practice: A Response to Jim Sterba. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):441-442.
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  21. Peter S. Wenz (1999). [Book Review] Nature's Keeper. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 25 (1):149-154.
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  22. Peter S. Wenz (1999). Pragmatism in Practice: The Efficiency of Sustainable Agriculture. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):391-410.
    Bryan Norton advocates using the perspectives and methods of American pragmatism in environmental philosophy. J. Baird Callicott criticizes Norton’s view as unproductive anti-philosophy. I find worth and deficiencies in both sides. On the one hand, I support the pragmatic approach, illustrating its use in an argument for sustainable agriculture. On the other hand, I take issue with Norton’s claim that pragmatists should confine themselves to anthrpocentric arguments. Here I agree with Callicott’s inclusion of nonanthropocentric consideration. However, I reject Callicott’s moral (...)
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  23. Peter S. Wenz (1999). Pragmatism in Practice. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):391-410.
    Bryan Norton advocates using the perspectives and methods of American pragmatism in environmental philosophy. J. Baird Callicott criticizes Norton’s view as unproductive anti-philosophy. I find worth and deficiencies in both sides. On the one hand, I support the pragmatic approach, illustrating its use in an argument for sustainable agriculture. On the other hand, I take issue with Norton’s claim that pragmatists should confine themselves to anthrpocentric arguments. Here I agree with Callicott’s inclusion of nonanthropocentric consideration. However, I reject Callicott’s moral (...)
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  24. Peter S. Wenz (1999). Wrongness, Wisdom, and Wilderness: Toward a Libertarian Theory of Ethics and the Environment. Environmental Ethics 21 (1):105-108.
     
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  25. Peter Wenz (1997). Philosophy Class as Commercial. Environmental Ethics 19 (2):205-216.
    Because commercialism tends toward environmental degradation, selection and treatment of the philosophical canon are environmental matters. Environmentalists and others who teach early modern and modern philosophy should, I argue, alter typical pedogogical approaches that (usually unwittingly) reinforce common assumptions underlying commercialism and promote anti-environmental perspectives. Typical treatments of Hobbes, Locke, Descartes, Kant, Hume, and Bentham focus on human selfishness, mind-body dualism, the subjectivity of values, and the mathematical nature of reality, positions that are frequently identified as contributing causes both of (...)
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  26. Peter S. Wenz (1997). Caring for Creation. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):141-142.
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  27. Peter S. Wenz (1997). Environmental Pragmatism. Environmental Ethics 19 (3):327-330.
    Wenz reviews "Environmental Pragmatism" edited by Andrew Light and Eric Katz.
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  28. Peter S. Wenz (1993). Alternate Foundations for the Land Ethic: Biologism, Cognitivism, and Pragmatism. Topoi 12 (1):53-67.
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  29. Peter S. Wenz (1993). Contracts, Animals, and Ecosystems. Social Theory and Practice 19 (3):315-344.
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  30. Peter S. Wenz (1993). Minimal, Moderate, and Extreme Moral Pluralism. Environmental Ethics 15 (1):61-74.
    Concentrating on the views of Christopher Stone, who advocates moral pluralism, and J. Baird Callicott, who criticizes Stone’s views, I argue that the debate has been confused by a conflation of three different positions, here called minimal, moderate, and extreme moral pluralism. Minimal pluralism is uncontroversial because all known moral theories are minimally pluralistic. Extreme pluralism is defective in the ways that Callicott alleges and, moreover, is inconsistent with integrity in the moral life. However, moderate pluralism of the sort that (...)
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  31. Peter S. Wenz (1989). Book Review:Environmental Ethics: Duties to and Values in the Natural World. Holmes Rolston III. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (1):195-.
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  32. Peter S. Wenz (1989). Concentric Circle Pluralism: A Response to Rolston. Between the Species 5 (3):9.
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  33. Peter S. Wenz (1989). Treating Animals Naturally. Between the Species 5 (1):3.
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  34. Peter S. Wenz (1986). Conservatism and Conservation. Philosophy 61 (238):503 - 512.
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  35. Peter S. Wenz (1986). The Critique of Berkeley's Empiricism In Orwell's 1984. Idealistic Studies 16 (2):133-152.
  36. Peter Wenz (1983). Ethics, Energy Policy, and Future Generations. Environmental Ethics 5 (3):195-209.
    Conflicts can arise between energy policies pursued in the interests of present people and the needs of future people for environmental and social conditions conducive to human well-being. This paper is addressed primarily to those who believe that we have moral obligations toward people of the distant future, and who consider these obligations to affect the range of energy policies which we are morally entitled to pursue. l examine utilitarian, contractarian, and formalist ethical theories to determine which provide adequate ethical (...)
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  37. Peter S. Wenz (1983). Book Review:Evolution, Morality and the Meaning of Life. Jeffrie G. Murphy. [REVIEW] Ethics 94 (1):140-.
  38. Peter S. Wenz (1982). Berkeley's Two Concepts of Impossibility: A Reply to Mckim. Journal of the History of Ideas 43.
    In my paper, "berkeley's christian neo-Platonism" ("journal of the history of ideas", July, 1976) I had maintained that george berkeley was a christian neo-Platonist who believed that abstract ideas exist in the mind of god, And that God used these ideas as archetypes during creation. Robert mckim commented that berkeley considered abstract ideas to be logical impossibilities, And therefore did not believe them to exist in god's mind. My reply is that berkeley employs two different concepts of impossibility for two (...)
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  39. Peter S. Wenz (1979). The Incompatibility of Act-Utilitarianism with Moral Integrity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):547-553.
    Bernard williams' monograph in "utilitarianism: for and against" contains an argument that utilitarianism is incompatible with personal integrity. though his argument is fatally flawed, its conclusion is supported in the present paper, which argues that the act utilitarianism (au) defended by j j c smart in "utilitarianism: for and against" tends to deprive its adherents of moral integrity. after briefly reviewing smart's version of au, i recount williams' argument and carr's reply concerning a link between au and a loss of (...)
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  40. Peter Wenz (1974). Civil Disruption. Journal of Social Philosophy 5 (3):16-21.
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