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Profile: Peter Woelert
  1. Peter Woelert (2013). The 'Economy of Memory': Publications, Citations, and the Paradox of Effective Research Governance. Minerva 51 (3):341-362.
    More recent advancements in digital technologies have significantly alleviated the dissemination of new scientific ideas as well as the storing, searching and retrieval of large amounts of published research findings. While not denying the benefits of this novel ‘economy of memory,’ this paper endeavors to shed light on the ways in which the use of digital technologies may be linked to a distortion of the system of formal publications that facilitates the effective dissemination and collaborative building of scientific knowledge. Through (...)
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  2. Peter Woelert (2013). Technology, Knowledge, Governance: The Political Relevance of Husserl's Critique of the Epistemic Effects of Formalization. Continental Philosophy Review 46 (4):487-507.
    This paper explores the political import of Husserl’s critical discussion of the epistemic effects of the formalization of rational thinking. More specifically, it argues that this discussion is of direct relevance to make sense of the pervasive processes of ‘technization’, that is, of a mechanistic and superficial generation and use of knowledge, to be observed in current contexts of governance. Building upon Husserl’s understanding of formalization as a symbolic technique for abstraction in the thinking with and about numbers, I argue (...)
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  3. Peter Woelert (2012). Idealization and External Symbolic Storage: The Epistemic and Technical Dimensions of Theoretic Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):335-366.
    This paper explores some of the constructive dimensions and specifics of human theoretic cognition, combining perspectives from (Husserlian) genetic phenomenology and distributed cognition approaches. I further consult recent psychological research concerning spatial and numerical cognition. The focus is on the nexus between the theoretic development of abstract, idealized geometrical and mathematical notions of space and the development and effective use of environmental cognitive support systems. In my discussion, I show that the evolution of the theoretic cognition of space apparently follows (...)
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  4. Peter Woelert (2011). Human Cognition, Space, and the Sedimentation of Meaning. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):113-137.
    The goal of this paper is to explore, from a phenomenologically informed perspective, the phenomenon of the operative spatialization of human thinking, viewed in its relationship with the embodied human organism’s spatial experience. Operative spatialization in this context refers to the cognitive role and functioning of spatial schematizations and differentiations in human thinking. My particular focus is the domain of conceptualization. By drawing on Husserl’s discussion of the (linguistic) process of a sedimentation of meaning, I aim to show that spatialization (...)
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  5. Peter Woelert (2009). Review of Glen Mazis, Humans, Animals, Machines: Blurring Boundaries. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):603-606.
  6. Peter Woelert (2008). “Man” and His Technological Doubles. Philosophy Today 52 (2):157-164.
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  7. Peter Woelert (2007). Kant's Hands, Spatial Orientation, and the Copernican Turn. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (2):139-150.
    In this paper we want to show how far the early, pre-critical Kant develops a theory of the constitution of space that not only anticipates insights usually attributed to the phenomenological theory of lived space with its emphasis on the constitutively central role of the human lived-body, but which also establishes the foundation for Kant’s Copernican turn according to which space is understood as ‘form of intuition’, implied in the activity of the transcendental subject. The key to understand this role (...)
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