Search results for 'Petra Schulz' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Petra Schulz (2003). Factivity: Its Nature and Acquisition. M. Niemeyer.score: 240.0
     
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  2. D. Schulz (1997). M. Puetz,(Hg.), Nietzsche in American Literature and Thought D. SCHULZ. Nietzsche Studien 26:588-592.score: 180.0
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  3. Moritz Schulz (2013). Modalised Conditionals: A Response to Willer. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):673-682.score: 60.0
    A paper by Schulz (Philos Stud 149:367–386, 2010) describes how the suppositional view of indicative conditionals can be supplemented with a derived view of epistemic modals. In a recent criticism of this paper, Willer (Philos Stud 153:365–375, 2011) argues that the resulting account of conditionals and epistemic modals cannot do justice to the validity of certain inference patterns involving modalised conditionals. In the present response, I analyse Willer’s argument, identify an implicit presupposition which can plausibly be denied and show (...)
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  4. Katrin Schulz & Robert Van Rooij (2006). Pragmatic Meaning and Non-Monotonic Reasoning: The Case of Exhaustive Interpretation. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (2):205 - 250.score: 60.0
    In this paper an approach to the exhaustive interpretation of answers is developed. It builds on a proposal brought forward by Groenendijk and Stokhof (1984). We will use the close connection between their approach and McCarthy’s (1980, 1986) predicate circumscription and describe exhaustive interpretation as an instance of interpretation in minimal models, well-known from work on counterfactuals (see for instance Lewis (1973)). It is shown that by combining this approach with independent developments in semantics/pragmatics one can overcome certain limitations (...)
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  5. Katrin Schulz & Robert van Rooij (2006). Pragmatic Meaning and Non-Monotonic Reasoning: The Case of Exhaustive Interpretation. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (2):205 - 250.score: 60.0
    In this paper an approach to the exhaustive interpretation of answers is developed. It builds on a proposal brought forward by Groenendijk and Stokhof (1984). We will use the close connection between their approach and McCarthy's (1980, 1986) predicate circumscription and describe exhaustive interpretation as an instance of interpretation in minimal models, well-known from work on counterfactuals (see for instance Lewis (1973)). It is shown that by combining this approach with independent developments in semantics/pragmatics one can overcome certain limitations of (...)
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  6. Reinhard Schulz (1999). Darstellen Und Rekonstruieren: Eine Hermeneutische Erwiderung Auf Ian Hacking. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 30 (2):365-378.score: 30.0
    Representing and Reconstructing: A Hermeneutical Reply to Ian Hacking. Hacking published in 1983 Representing and Intervening which has provoked, particularly in the US, the so called realism/anti-realism debate which is still alive today. He lays claim to anti-realism for theory and to realism for the experiment. Following him, only that which can be used for manipulating something (e.g., the path of an electon) is realistic. H. Putnam is a severe critic of this dualism. In my paper I am (...)
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  7. Armin W. Schulz (2011). Sober & Wilson's Evolutionary Arguments for Psychological Altruism: A Reassessment. Biology and Philosophy 26 (2):251-260.score: 30.0
    In their book Unto Others, Sober and Wilson argue that various evolutionary considerations (based on the logic of natural selection) lend support to the truth of psychological altruism. However, recently, Stephen Stich has raised a number of challenges to their reasoning: in particular, he claims that three out of the four evolutionary arguments they give are internally unconvincing, and that the one that is initially plausible fails to take into account recent findings from cognitive science and thus leaves open a (...)
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  8. Moritz Schulz (2011). Chance and Actuality. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):105-129.score: 30.0
    The relation between chance and actuality gives rise to a puzzle. On the one hand, it may be a chancy matter what will actually happen. On the other hand, the standard semantics for ‘actually’ implies that sentences beginning with ‘actually’ are never contingent. To elucidate the puzzle, I defend a kind of objective semantic indeterminacy: in a chancy world, it may be a chancy matter which proposition is expressed by sentences containing ‘actually’. I bring this thesis to bear on certain (...)
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  9. Moritz Schulz (2010). Epistemic Modals and Informational Consequence. Synthese 174 (3):385 - 395.score: 30.0
    Recently, Yalcin (Epistemic modals. Mind, 116 , 983–1026, 2007) put forward a novel account of epistemic modals. It is based on the observation that sentences of the form ‘ & Might ’ do not embed under ‘suppose’ and ‘if’. Yalcin concludes that such sentences must be contradictory and develops a notion of informational consequence which validates this idea. I will show that informational consequence is inadequate as an account of the logic of epistemic modals: it cannot deal with reasoning from (...)
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  10. Moritz Schulz (2010). Wondering What Might Be. Philosophical Studies 149 (3):367 - 386.score: 30.0
    This paper explores the possibility of supplementing the suppositional view of indicative conditionals with a corresponding view of epistemic modals. The most striking feature of the suppositional view consists in its claim that indicative conditionals are to be evaluated by conditional probabilities. On the basis of a natural link between indicative conditionals and epistemic modals, a corresponding thesis about the probabilities of statements governed by epistemic modals can be derived. The paper proceeds by deriving further consequences of this thesis, in (...)
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  11. Moritz Schulz (2010). The Dynamics of Indexical Belief. Erkenntnis 72 (3):337 - 351.score: 30.0
    Indexical beliefs pose a special problem for standard theories of Bayesian updating. Sometimes we are uncertain about our location in time and space. How are we to update our beliefs in situations like these? In a stepwise fashion, I develop a constraint on the dynamics of indexical belief. As an application, the suggested constraint is brought to bear on the Sleeping Beauty problem.
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  12. Armin W. Schulz (2011). Simulation, Simplicity, and Selection: An Evolutionary Perspective on High-Level Mindreading. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 152 (2):271 - 285.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that a natural selection-based perspective gives reasons for thinking that the core of the ability to mindread cognitively complex mental states is subserved by a simulationist process—that is, that it relies on nonspecialised mechanisms in the attributer's cognitive architecture whose primary function is the generation of her own decisions and inferences. In more detail, I try to establish three conclusions. First, I try to make clearer what the dispute between simulationist and non-simulationist theories of mindreading (...)
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  13. Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.) (2007). Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Understanding causal structure is a central task of human cognition. Causal learning underpins the development of our concepts and categories, our intuitive theories, and our capacities for planning, imagination and inference. During the last few years, there has been an interdisciplinary revolution in our understanding of learning and reasoning: Researchers in philosophy, psychology, and computation have discovered new mechanisms for learning the causal structure of the world. This new work provides a rigorous, formal basis for theory theories of concepts and (...)
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  14. Armin W. Schulz (2009). Condorcet and Communitarianism: Boghossian's Fallacious Inference. Synthese 166 (1):55 - 68.score: 30.0
    This paper defends the communitarian account of meaning against Boghossian’s (Wittgensteinian) arguments. Boghossian argues that whilst such an account might be able to accommodate the infinitary characteristic of meaning, it cannot account for its normativity: he claims that, since the dispositions of a group must mirror those of its members, the former cannot be used to evaluate the latter. However, as this paper aims to make clear, this reasoning is fallacious. Modelling the issue with four (justifiable) assumptions, it shows that (...)
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  15. Benjamin Schnieder, Moritz Schulz & Alexander Steinberg, What Might Be and What Might Have Been.score: 30.0
    The article is an extended comment on Strawson’s neglected paper ‘Maybes and Might Have Beens’, in which he suggests that both statements about what may be the case and statements about what might have been the case can be understood epistemically. We argue that Strawson is right about the first sort of statements but wrong about the second. Finally, we discuss some of Strawson’s claims which are related to positions of Origin Essentialism.
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  16. Armin W. Schulz (2008). Structural Flaws: Massive Modularity and the Argument From Design. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):733-743.score: 30.0
    recent defence of the massive modularity thesis. However, as this paper seeks to show, there are major flaws in its structure. If construed deductively, it is unsound: modular mental architecture is not necessarily the best architecture, and even if it were, this alone would not show that this architecture evolved. If construed inductively, it is not much more convincing, as it then appears to be too weak to support the kind of modularity Carruthers is concerned with. The upshot of this (...)
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  17. Katrin Schulz (2011). “If You'd Wiggled A, Then B Would've Changed”. Synthese 179 (2):239-251.score: 30.0
    This paper deals with the truth conditions of conditional sentences. It focuses on a particular class of problematic examples for semantic theories for these sentences. I will argue that the examples show the need to refer to dynamic, in particular causal laws in an approach to their truth conditions. More particularly, I will claim that we need a causal notion of consequence. The proposal subsequently made uses a representation of causal dependencies as proposed in Pearl (2000) to formalize a causal (...)
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  18. Nick Haverkamp & Moritz Schulz (2012). A Note on Comparative Probability. Erkenntnis 76 (3):395-402.score: 30.0
    A possible event always seems to be more probable than an impossible event. Although this constraint, usually alluded to as regularity , is prima facie very attractive, it cannot hold for standard probabilities. Moreover, in a recent paper Timothy Williamson has challenged even the idea that regularity can be integrated into a comparative conception of probability by showing that the standard comparative axioms conflict with certain cases if regularity is assumed. In this note, we suggest that there is a natural (...)
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  19. Roland M. Schulz (2007). Lyotard, Postmodernism and Science Education: A Rejoinder to Zembylas. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (6):633–656.score: 30.0
  20. Moritz Schulz (2009). A Note on Two Theorems by Adams and M C Gee. Review of Symbolic Logic 2 (3):509-516.score: 30.0
    Three-valued accounts of conditionals frequently promise (a) to conform to the probabilistic view that conditionals are evaluated by conditional probabilities, and (b) to yield a plausible account of compounds of conditionals. However, McGee (1981) shows that probabilistic validity, the conception of validity most naturally associated with the probabilistic view, cannot be characterized by a finite matrix. Adams (1995) indicates a further generalization of this result. Nevertheless, Adams (1986) provides a description of probabilistic validity in three-valued terms by going beyond the (...)
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  21. Armin W. Schulz (2010). It Takes Two: Sexual Strategies and Game Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (1):41-49.score: 30.0
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  22. Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, David M. Sobel, Laura Schulz, Tamar Kushnir & David Danks, A Theory of Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.score: 30.0
    We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent, learned representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously understood in terms of the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Children’s causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learning causal Bayes nets and for predicting with them. Experimental results suggest that 2- to 4-year-old children (...)
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  23. Katrin Schulz (2005). A Pragmatic Solution for the Paradox of Free Choice Permission. Synthese 147 (2):343 - 377.score: 30.0
    In this paper, a pragmatic approach to the phenomenon of free choice permission is proposed. Free choice permission is explained as due to taking the speaker (i) to obey certain Gricean maxims of conversation and (ii) to be competent on the deontic options, i.e. to know the valid obligations and permissions. The approach differs from other pragmatic approaches to free choice permission in giving a formally precise description of the class of inferences that can be derived based on these two (...)
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  24. Armin W. Schulz (2013). Overextension: The Extended Mind and Arguments From Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (2):241-255.score: 30.0
    I critically assess two widely cited evolutionary biological arguments for two versions of the ‘Extended Mind Thesis’ (EMT): namely, an argument appealing to Dawkins’s ‘Extended Phenotype Thesis’ (EPT) and an argument appealing to ‘Developmental Systems Theory’ (DST). Specifically, I argue that, firstly, appealing to the EPT is not useful for supporting the EMT (in either version), as it is structured and motivated too differently from the latter to be able to corroborate or elucidate it. Secondly, I extend and defend Rupert’s (...)
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  25. Larry J. Schulz (2011). Structural Elements in the Zhou Yijing Hexagram Sequence. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):639-665.score: 30.0
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  26. Joshua Schulz (2007). Grace and the New Man: Conscious Humiliation and the Revolution of Disposition in Kant's Religion. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):439-446.score: 30.0
    Kant’s discussion of radical evil and moral regeneration in Religion Within the Bounds of Reason Alone raises numerous moral and metaphysical problems.If the ground of one’s disposition does not lie in time, as Kant argues, how can it be reformed, as the moral law commands? If divine aid is necessary for thisimpossible reformation, how does this not destroy a person’s moral personality by bypassing her freedom? This paper argues that these problems can be resolved by showing how Kant can conceive (...)
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  27. Peter Schulz (1998). Mary Catherine Baseheart, S.C.N.: Person in the World. Introduction to the Philosophy of Edith Stein. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 15 (2):137-140.score: 30.0
  28. Walter Schulz (2000). On the Problem of Death. Continental Philosophy Review 33 (4):467-486.score: 30.0
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  29. Barry Smith, Jose L. V. Mejino Jr, Stefan Schulz, Anand Kumar & Cornelius Rosse (2005). Anatomical Information Science. In Spatial Information Theory. Springer.score: 30.0
    The Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) is a map of the human body. Like maps of other sorts – including the map-like representations we find in familiar anatomical atlases – it is a representation of a certain portion of spatial reality as it exists at a certain (idealized) instant of time. But unlike other maps, the FMA comes in the form of a sophisticated ontology of its objectdomain, comprising some 1.5 million statements of anatomical relations among some 70,000 anatomical kinds. (...)
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  30. Armin Schulz (2011). The Adaptive Importance of Cognitive Efficiency: An Alternative Theory of Why We Have Beliefs and Desires. Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):31-50.score: 30.0
    Finding out why we have beliefs and desires is important for a thorough understanding of the nature of our minds (and those of other animals). It is therefore unsurprising that several accounts have been presented that are meant to answer this question. At least in the philosophical literature, the most widely accepted of these are due to Kim Sterelny and Peter Godfrey-Smith, who argue that beliefs and desires evolved due to their enabling us to be behaviourally flexible in a way (...)
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  31. Holger Stenzhorn, Stefan Schulz, Martin Boeker & Barry Smith (2009). Adapting Clinical Ontologies in Real-World Environments. Journal of Universal Computer Science, 14 (22), , 14 (22):3767-3780.score: 30.0
    The desideratum of semantic interoperability has been intensively discussed in medical informatics circles in recent years. Originally, experts assumed that this issue could be sufficiently addressed by insisting simply on the application of shared clinical terminologies or clinical information models. However, the use of the term ‘ontology’ has been steadily increasing more recently. We discuss criteria for distinguishing clinical ontologies from clinical terminologies and information models. Then, we briefly present the role clinical ontologies play in two multicentric research projects. Finally, (...)
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  32. Armin W. Schulz (2011). Gigerenzer's Evolutionary Arguments Against Rational Choice Theory: An Assessment. Philosophy of Science 78 (5):1272-1282.score: 30.0
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  33. Robert van Rooij & Katrin Schulz (2004). Exhaustive Interpretation of Complex Sentences. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13 (4):491-519.score: 30.0
    In terms of Groenendijk and Stokhofs (1984) formalization of exhaustive interpretation, many conversational implicatures can be accounted for. In this paper we justify and generalize this approach. Our justification proceeds by relating their account via Halpern and Moses (1984) non-monotonic theory of only knowing to the Gricean maxims of Quality and the first sub-maxim of Quantity. The approach of Groenendijk and Stokhof (1984) is generalized such that it can also account for implicatures that are triggered in subclauses not entailed by (...)
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  34. Walter Schulz (1954). Das Verhältnis des späten Schelling zu Hegel. Schellings Spekulation über den Satz. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 8 (3):336 - 352.score: 30.0
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  35. Armin W. Schulz (2008). Risky Business: Evolutionary Theory and Human Attitudes Toward Risk—a Reply to Okasha. Journal of Philosophy 105 (3):156-165.score: 30.0
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  36. Larry J. Schulz & Thomas J. Cunningham (1990). The Seasonal Structure Underlying the Arrangement of Hexagrams in the Yijing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (3):289-313.score: 30.0
  37. Stefan Sütterlin, Stefan M. Schulz, Theresa Stumpf, Paul Pauli & Claus Vögele (2013). Enhanced Cardiac Perception Is Associated With Increased Susceptibility to Framing Effects. Cognitive Science 37 (5):922-935.score: 30.0
    Previous studies suggest in line with dual process models that interoceptive skills affect controlled decisions via automatic or implicit processing. The “framing effect” is considered to capture implicit effects of task-irrelevant emotional stimuli on decision-making. We hypothesized that cardiac awareness, as a measure of interoceptive skills, is positively associated with susceptibility to the framing effect. Forty volunteers performed a risky-choice framing task in which the effect of loss versus gain frames on decisions based on identical information was assessed. The results (...)
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  38. Walter Schulz (1975). Anmerkungen zu Schelling. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 29 (3):321 - 336.score: 30.0
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  39. Peter Schulz (2001). “Know How” and “Know That”. Semiotics:371-382.score: 30.0
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  40. J. Schulz (1962). Pinturicchio and the Revival of Antiquity. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 25 (1/2):35-55.score: 30.0
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  41. Armin W. Schulz (2012). Signals: Evolution, Learning, and Information. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):84-88.score: 30.0
    Journal of Economic Methodology, Volume 19, Issue 1, Page 84-88, March 2012.
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  42. Armin Schulz, The Benefits of Rule Following: A New Account of the Evolution of Desires.score: 30.0
    A key component of much current research in behavioral ecology, cognitive science, and economics is a model of the mind at least partly based on beliefs and desires. However, despite this prevalence, there are still many open questions concerning both the structure and the applicability of this model. This is especially so when it comes to its ‘desire’ part: in particular, it is not yet entirely clear when and why we should expect organisms to be desire-based—understood so as to imply (...)
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  43. Larry J. Schulz (1990). Structural Motifs in the Arrangement of the 64 Gua in the Zhouyi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (3):345-358.score: 30.0
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  44. Eva Neu, Michael Ch Michailov & Guntram Schulz (2008). On Theological Anthropology and Philosophical Theology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:229-237.score: 30.0
    INTRODUCTION: Philosophy is the unique science which considers all other sciences in systematically unity (Kant). The classical anthropology (Platon, Aristoteles, Descartes, Hume, Kant, etc.) considers the human and his "spheres" (biological, psychological, logical, philosophical, theological) and his interdependence with nature and society. A philosophical theology investigates spiritual phenomena, described by religions and parapsychology in context of ethics, epistemology (incl. metaphysics), aesthetics. A theological anthropology should consider these phenomena multidimensional in context of a holisticscience, i.e. physico- (Kant), bio- (Lüke), psycho-, logico-, (...)
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  45. A. W. Schulz (2013). Beyond the Hype: The Value of Evolutionary Theorizing in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (1):46-72.score: 30.0
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  46. Peter J. Schulz (2008). Toward the Subjectivity of the Human Person. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):161-176.score: 30.0
    Edith Stein’s work revolves around one central question, namely, the identity of the person. Discussions of this topic are already present in Stein’s dissertation. Iexamine her theory of identity, developed throughout her work and maturing in her magnum opus, Finite and Eternal Being, in three stages, each of which is historically relevant and original. First, Stein’s development of the question is examined phenomenologically, focusing on Stein’s early work. Second, I will show how Stein takes her early phenomenological positions concerning the (...)
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  47. Elizabeth Baraff Bonawitz, Darlene Ferranti, Rebecca Saxe, Alison Gopnik, Andrew N. Meltzoff, James Woodward & Laura E. Schulz (2010). Just Do It? Investigating the Gap Between Prediction and Action in Toddlers' Causal Inferences. Cognition 115 (1):104-117.score: 30.0
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  48. Uwe Hartung, Sara Rubinelli & Peter J. Schulz (2011). “Your Risk is Low, Because …”: Argument-Driven Online Genetic Counselling. Argument and Computation 1 (3):199-214.score: 30.0
    Advances in genetic research have created the need to inform consumers. Yet, the communication of hereditary risk and of the options for how to deal with it is a difficult task. Due to the abstract nature of genetics, people tend to overestimate or underestimate their risk. This paper addresses the issue of how to communicate risk information on hereditary breast and ovarian cancer through an online application. The core of the paper illustrates the design of OPERA, a risk assessment instrument (...)
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  49. D. Seddig-Raufie, L. Jansen, S. Schulz, D. Schober & M. Boeker (2012). Proposed Actions Are No Actions: Re-Modelling an Ontology Design Pattern with a Realist Top-Level Ontology. Journal of Biomedical Semantics 3 (2).score: 30.0
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  50. Harmut Rosenau & Heiko Schulz (1997). Aesthetic Nihilism: The Dialectic of Repetition and Nonrepetition in Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. The European Legacy 2 (4):627-634.score: 30.0
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