Search results for 'Phenomenological' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daniel Schmicking (2005). Is There Imaginary Loudness? Reconsidering Phenomenological Method. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):169-182.score: 25.0
    Because imagination constitutes an indispensable tool of phenomenology, e.g., in understanding another author’s description, in eidetic reduction, etc., the practicability of phenomenological method and its claim to objectivity ought to be reconsidered with regard to its dependence on imagination. Auditory imagery serves to illustrate problems involved in grasping and analyzing imaginative contents – loudness in this case. Similar to phonetic segmentation and classification, phenomenologists segment and classify mental acts and contents. Just as phoneticians rely on experts’ evaluations of notations (...)
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  2. Amedeo Giorgi (2008). Concerning a Serious Misunderstanding of the Essence of the Phenomenological Method in Psychology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (1):33-58.score: 24.0
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  3. D. J. Saab, Culture as Mediator for What is Ready-to-Hand: A Phenomenological Exploration of Semantic Networks.score: 24.0
    Upon what philosophical foundation are semantic network graphs based? Does this foundation allow for the legitimization of other semantic networks and ontological diversity? How can we design our computational and informational systems to accommodate this ontological diversity and the variety of semantic networks? Are semantic networks segmentations of larger semantic landscapes? This paper explores semantic networks from a Heideggerian existentialist and phenomenological perspective. The analysis presented uses cultural schema theory to bridge the syntactic and lexical elements to the semantic (...)
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  4. Xiaomang Deng (2010). The Phenomenological Ontology of Literature. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):621-630.score: 24.0
    Literary ontology is essentially a phenomenological issue rather than one of epistemology, sociology, or psychology. It is a theory of the phenomenological essence intuited from a sense of beauty, based on the phenomenological ontology of beauty, which puts into brackets the sociohistorical premises and material conditions of aesthetic phenomena. Beauty is the objectified emotion. This is the phenomenological definition of the essence of beauty, which manifests itself on three levels, namely emotion qua selfconsciousness, sense of beauty (...)
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  5. Jonathan A. Smith (2009). Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis: Theory, Method and Research. Sage.score: 24.0
    This book presents a comprehensive guide to interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) which is an increasingly popular approach to qualitative inquiry taught to undergraduate and postgraduate students today. The first chapter outlines the theoretical foundations for IPA. It discusses phenomenology, hermeneutics, and idiography and how they have been taken up by IPA. The next four chapters provide detailed, step by step guidelines to conducting IPA research: study design, data collection and interviewing, data analysis, and writing up. In the next section, (...)
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  6. Darren Langdridge (2007). Phenomenological Psychology: Theory, Research, and Method. Pearson Education.score: 24.0
    The book moves from descriptive through to more interpretative phenomenological methods to enable the reader to learn to use the main approaches to ...
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  7. Linda Finlay (2008). A Dance Between the Reduction and Reflexivity: Explicating the "Phenomenological Psychological Attitude". Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (1):1-32.score: 24.0
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  8. Greg Bird (2009). What is Phenomenological Sociology Again? Human Studies 32 (4):419-439.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I seek to caution the increasing number of contemporary sociologists who are engaging with continental phenomenological sociology without looking at the Anglo-American tradition. I look at a particular debate that took place during the formative period in the Anglo-American tradition. My focus is on the way participants sought to negotiate the disciplinary division between philosophy and sociology. I outline various ways that these disciplinary exigencies, especially the institutional struggles with the sociological establishment, shaped how participants defined (...)
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  9. Harvie Ferguson (2006). Phenomenological Sociology: Insight and Experience in Modern Society. Sage.score: 24.0
    What is phenomenological sociology? Why is it significant? This innovative and thought-provoking book argues that phenomenology was the most significant, wide-ranging and influential philosophy to emerge in the twentieth century. The social character of phenomenology is explored in its relation to the concern in twentieth century sociology with questions of modern experience. Phenomenology and sociology come together as 'ethnographies of the present'. As such, they break free of the self-imposed limitations of each to establish a new, critical understanding of (...)
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  10. Stuart J. Murray & Dave Holmes (2014). Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) and the Ethics of Body and Place: Critical Methodological Reflections. [REVIEW] Human Studies 37 (1):15-30.score: 24.0
    This article is a critical methodological reflection on the use of interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) initiated in the context of a qualitative research project on the experience of seclusion in a psychiatric setting. It addresses an explicit gap in the IPA literature to explore the ways that Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology can extend the remit of IPA for noncognitivist qualitative research projects beyond the field of health psychology. In particular, the article develops Merleau-Ponty’s understanding of the lived-body, language, and embodied speech, (...)
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  11. Joseph J. Kockelmans (ed.) (1987). Phenomenological Psychology: The Dutch School. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 24.0
    Husserl's Original View on Phenomenological Psychology* JOSEPH J.KOCKELMANS Some forty years ago Edmund Husserl spoke publicly for the first time of a ...
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  12. A. -C. Leiviskä Deland, G. Karlsson & H. Fatouros-Bergman (2011). A Phenomenological Analysis of the Psychotic Experience. Human Studies 34 (1):23-42.score: 24.0
    Six individuals with experience of psychosis were interviewed about their psychotic experiences. The material was analyzed using the empirical phenomenological psychological method. The results consist of a whole meaning structure, a gestalt, entailing the following characteristics: The feeling of estrangement in relationship to the world; the dissolution of time; the loss of intuitive social knowledge; the alienation of oneself, and finally; the loss of intentionality/loss of agency. In brief, the results show that an altered perception of the self and (...)
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  13. A. H. Louie & I. W. Richardson (2006). A Phenomenological Calculus for Anisotropic Systems. Axiomathes 16 (1-2):215-243.score: 24.0
    The phenomenological calculus is a relational paradigm for complex systems, closely related in substance and spirit to Robert Rosen’s own approach. Its mathematical language is multilinear algebra. The epistemological exploration continues in this paper, with the expansion of the phenomenological calculus into the realm of anisotropy.
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  14. Risto Heiskala (2011). The Meaning of Meaning in Sociology. The Achievements and Shortcomings of Alfred Schutz's Phenomenological Sociology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (3):231-246.score: 24.0
    Phenomenological sociology was founded at the beginning of 1930s by Alfred Schutz. His mundane phenomenology sought to combine impulses drawn from Husserl's transcendental phenomenology and Weber's action theory. It was made famous at the turn of 1960s and 1970s by Garfinkel's ethnomethodology and Berger & Luckmann's social constructionism. This paper deals with the notable accomplishments of Schutz and his followers and then proceeds to a shared shortcoming, which is that the phenomenological approach is unable to understand meaning in (...)
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  15. Towfic Shomar (2008). Bohr as a Phenomenological Realist. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 39 (2):321 - 349.score: 24.0
    There is confusion among scholars of Bohr as to whether he should be categorized as an instrumentalist (see Faye 1991 ) or a realist (see Folse 1985 ). I argue that Bohr is a realist, and that the confusion is due to the fact that he holds a very special view of realism, which did not coincide with the philosophers’ views. His approach was sometimes labelled instrumentalist and other times realist, because he was an instrumentalist on the theoretical level, but (...)
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  16. Matt Bower (2014). Husserl’s Motivation and Method for Phenomenological Reconstruction. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):135-152.score: 24.0
    In this paper I piece present an account of Husserl’s approach to the phenomenological reconstruction of consciousness’ immemorial past, a problem, I suggest, that is quite pertinent for defenders of Lockean psychological continuity views of personal identity. To begin, I sketch the background of the problem facing the very project of a genetic phenomenology, within which the reconstructive analysis is situated. While the young Husserl took genetic matters to be irrelevant to the main task of phenomenology, he would later (...)
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  17. Jay Teal (2009). Nothing Personal: An Empirical Phenomenological Study of the Experience of “Being-on-an-SSRI”. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (1):19-50.score: 24.0
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  18. Krishnaveni Ganeson & Lisa C. Ehrich (2009). Transition Into High School: A Phenomenological Study. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):60-78.score: 24.0
    Starting high school can be a challenging but also exciting time for students. The focus of this paper lies with students' experiences of transition into secondary school. Sixteen students from one government school in New South Wales kept a journal for their first ten weeks in high school as a way of recording their experiences. Their journal entries were studied utilising a phenomenological psychological approach following Giorgi (1985a, 1985b ). The aim of this research approach is to produce clear (...)
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  19. Hanne Jacobs (2013). Phenomenology as a Way of Life? Husserl on Phenomenological Reflection and Self-Transformation. Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):349-369.score: 24.0
    In this article I consider whether and how Husserl’s transcendental phenomenological method can initiate a phenomenological way of life. The impetus for this investigation originates in a set of manuscripts written in 1926 (published in Zur phänomenologischen Reduktion) where Husserl suggests that the consistent commitment to and performance of phenomenological reflection can change one’s life to the point where a simple return to the life lived before this reflection is no longer possible. Husserl identifies this point of (...)
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  20. Tone Roald (2008). Toward a Phenomenological Psychology of Art Appreciation. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (2):189-212.score: 24.0
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  21. Tamara Olive (2008). Desire for Higher Education in First-Generation Hispanic College Students Enrolled in an Academic Support Program: A Phenomenological Analysis. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (1):81-110.score: 24.0
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  22. Lester Embree (2008). The Nature and Role of Phenomenological Psychology in Alfred Schutz. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (2):141-150.score: 24.0
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  23. Elisabetta Basso (2012). From the Problem of the Nature of Psychosis to the Phenomenological Reform of Psychiatry. Historical and Epistemological Remarks on Ludwig Binswanger's Psychiatric Project. Medicine Studies 3 (4):215-232.score: 24.0
    This paper focuses on one of the original moments of the development of the “phenomenological” current of psychiatry, namely, the psychopathological research of Ludwig Binswanger. By means of the clinical and conceptual problem of schizophrenia as it was conceived and developed at the beginning of the twentieth century, I will try to outline and analyze Binswanger’s perspective from a both historical and epistemological point of view. Binswanger’s own way means of approaching and conceiving schizophrenia within the scientific, medical, and (...)
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  24. Barbro Giorgi (2011). A Phenomenological Analysis of the Experience of Pivotal Moments in Therapy as Defined by Clients. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 42 (1):61-106.score: 24.0
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  25. Wayne K. Andrew (1985). The Phenomenological Foundations for Empirical Methodology I: The Method of Optional of Variations. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 16 (2):1-29.score: 24.0
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  26. Guilherme P. Messas (2010). A Phenomenological Contribution to the Approach of Biological Psychiatry. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (2):180-200.score: 24.0
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  27. Jann E. Schlimme (2012). Lived Autonomy and Chronic Mental Illness: A Phenomenological Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):387-404.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I develop a phenomenological description of lived autonomy and describe possible alterations of lived autonomy associated with chronic depression as they relate to specific psychopathological symptoms. I will distinguish between two types of lived autonomy, a pre-reflective type and a reflective type, which differ with respect to the explicitness of the action that is willed into existence; and I will relate these types to the classical distinction between freedom of intentional action and freedom of the will. (...)
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  28. Ernesto Spinelli (2005). The Interpreted World: An Introduction to Phenomenological Psychology. Sage.score: 24.0
    Praise for First Edition: `This book is highly recommended to a wide range of people as a clear and systematic introduction to phenomenological psychology... the book has set the stage for possible new colloquia between the phenomenological and other approaches in psychology' - Changes `As a trainee interested in matters existential, I have been put off in the past by the long-winded and confusing texts usually available in academic libraries. Thankfully, here is a text that remedies that situation... (...)
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  29. Thomas S. Eberle (2012). Phenomenological Life-World Analysis and Ethnomethodology's Program. Human Studies 35 (2):279-304.score: 24.0
    This paper discusses ethnomethodology's program in relation to the phenomenological life-world analysis of Alfred Schutz. A recent publication of Garfinkel's early writings sheds new light on how he made use of phenomenological reflections in order to create a new sociological approach. Garfinkel used Schutz's life-world analysis as a source of inspiration, called for 'misreading' in the sense of an alternate reading and developed a new, empirical approach to the analysis of social order which he called 'ethnomethodology'. Ethnomethodologists usually (...)
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  30. Mufid J. Hannush (1985). The Methodology of Phenomenological Psychobiography: The Case of Richard Wright's Black Boy Revisited. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 16 (1):39-68.score: 24.0
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  31. Allan M. Savage (2010). Phenomenological Philosophy: And Reconstruction in Western Theism. Westbow Press.score: 24.0
    Theistic theology as responsibility for the word of God -- The existential situation in which I find myself -- Christian culture : its philosophical roots and present crisis -- Reconstruction in theistic theology -- Thresholds of phenomenological theological inquiry -- Particular thresholds of phenomenological inquiry -- Phenomenology and the Catholicity of Vatican II : a broad criticism.
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  32. Hanneke van der Meide, Carlo Leget & Gert Olthuis (2013). Giving Voice to Vulnerable People: The Value of Shadowing for Phenomenological Healthcare Research. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):731-737.score: 24.0
    Phenomenological healthcare research should include the lived experiences of a broad group of healthcare users. In this paper it is shown how shadowing can give a voice to people in vulnerable situations who are often excluded from interview studies. Shadowing is an observational method in which the researcher observes an individual during a relatively long time. Central aspects of the method are the focus on meaning expressed by the whole body, and an extended stay of the researcher in the (...)
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  33. Les Todres (2007). Embodied Enquiry: Phenomenological Touchstones for Research, Psychotherapy, and Spirituality. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Drawing on a particular emphasis within the phenomenological tradition as exemplified by Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Eugene Gendlin, this book considers the role of the lived body as a way of knowing and being. The author, a psychologist, psychotherapist and qualitative researcher pursues this theme within three practical contexts that illustrate some of the nuances of embodied enquiry: qualitative research, psychotherapy, spirituality. The three sections of the book also provide examples of how embodied enquiry is not just a philosophical perspective (...)
     
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  34. Boyd Millar (2014). The Phenomenological Problem of Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):625-654.score: 23.0
    A perceptual experience of a given object seems to make the object itself present to the perceiver’s mind. Many philosophers have claimed that naïve realism (the view that to perceive is to stand in a primitive relation of acquaintance to the world) provides a better account of this phenomenological directness of perceptual experience than does the content view (the view that to perceive is to represent the world to be a certain way). But the naïve realist account of this (...)
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  35. Corinne Jola, Shantel Ehrenberg & Dee Reynolds (2012). The Experience of Watching Dance: Phenomenological–Neuroscience Duets. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):17-37.score: 23.0
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between neuroscientific findings and phenomenologically informed methodologies in the investigation of kinesthetic empathy in watching dance. Interest in phenomenology has recently increased in cognitive science (Gallagher and Zahavi 2008 ) and dance scholars have recently contributed important new insights into the use of phenomenology in dance studies (e.g. Legrand and Ravn (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8(3):389–408, 2009 ); Parviainen (Dance Research Journal 34(1):11–26, 2002 ); Rothfield (Topoi 24:43–53, 2005 )). In vision research, coherent neural (...)
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  36. Guus H. Labooy (2014). Duns Scotus' Univocity: Applied to the Debate on Phenomenological Theology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (1):53-73.score: 22.0
    Scotus’ theory of univocity is described: his exact definition of univocity and his view of transcendental concepts that are ‘simply simple’. These concepts are said to be univocally applied to God and creatures. Next, we describe Scotus’ views on univocity in ‘being’ and the precise meaning of the infinite and finite ‘mode’ of being. Finally, we apply these results to work of Heidegger and Marion. It appears that they had an insufficient grasp of the intricacies of Scotus’ theory of univocity (...)
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  37. Christopher J. Frost & Augustus R. Lumia (2012). The Ethics of Neuroscience and the Neuroscience of Ethics: A Phenomenological–Existential Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):457-474.score: 22.0
    Advances in the neurosciences have many implications for a collective understanding of what it means to be human, in particular, notions of the self, the concept of volition or agency, questions of individual responsibility, and the phenomenology of consciousness. As the ability to peer directly into the brain is scientifically honed, and conscious states can be correlated with patterns of neural processing, an easy—but premature—leap is to postulate a one-way, brain-based determinism. That leap is problematic, however, and emerging findings in (...)
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  38. Søren Overgaard (2006). The Problem of Other Minds: Wittgenstein's Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):53-73.score: 21.0
    This paper discusses Wittgenstein's take on the problem of other minds. In opposition to certain widespread views that I collect under the heading of the “No Problem Interpretation,” I argue that Wittgenstein does address some problem of other minds. However, Wittgenstein's problem is not the traditional epistemological problem of other minds; rather, it is more reminiscent of the issue of intersubjectivity as it emerges in the writings of phenomenologists such as Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, and Heidegger. This is one sense in which (...)
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  39. Uriah Kriegel (2004). The Functional Role of Consciousness: A Phenomenological Approach. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):171-93.score: 21.0
    In this paper, a theoretical account of the functional role of consciousness in the cognitive system of normal subjects is developed. The account is based upon an approach to consciousness that is drawn from the phenomenological tradition. On this approach, consciousness is essentially peripheral self-awareness, in a sense to be duly explained. It will be argued that the functional role of consciousness, so construed, is to provide the subject with just enough information about her ongoing experience to make it (...)
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  40. Chad Engelland (2010). The Phenomenological Kant: Heidegger's Interest in Transcendental Philosophy. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 41 (2):150-169.score: 21.0
    This paper provides a new, comprehensive overview of Martin Heidegger’s interpretations of Immanuel Kant. Its aim is to identify Heidegger’s motive in interpreting Kant and to distinguish, for the first time, the four phases of Heidegger’s reading of Kant. The promise of the “phenomenological Kant” gave Heidegger entrance to a rich domain of investigation. In four phases and with reference to Husserl, Heidegger interpreted Kant as first falling short of phenomenology (1919-1925), then approaching phenomenology (1925-1927), then advancing phenomenology (1927-1929), (...)
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  41. Richard Schmitt (1959). Husserl's Transcendental-Phenomenological Reduction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (2):238-245.score: 21.0
    The transcendental phenomenological reduction is described as the transition from thinking to reflection, Which involves a change of attitude. Schmitt elaborates what it means to "bracket the objective world" and to suspend judgement. The traditional distinction between thinking and reflection, Based on the distinction between what is inside and what is outside the mind, Is shown to be inadequate. Reflection really involves critical detachment, A neutral attitude and disinterestedness; it must describe the new facts rather than explain them. Hence, (...)
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  42. John Cogan, The Phenomenological Reduction. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
  43. Elizabeth Ennen (2003). Phenomenological Coping Skills and the Striatal Memory System. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):299-325.score: 21.0
    Most cognitive scientists are committed to some version of representationalism, the view that intelligent behavior is caused by internal processes that involve computations over representations. Phenomenologists, however, argue that certain types of intelligent behavior, engaged coping skills, are nonrepresentational. Recent neuroscientific work on multiple memory systems indicates that while many types of intelligent behavior are representational, the types of intelligent behavior cited by phenomenologists are indeed nonrepresentational. This neuroscientific research thus vindicates a key phenomenological claim about the nature of (...)
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  44. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). Toward an Objective Phenomenological Vocabulary: How Seeing a Scarlet Red is Like Hearing a Trumpet's Blare. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):837-858.score: 21.0
    Nagel’s challenge is to devise an objective phenomenological vocabulary that can describe the objective structural similarities between aural and visual perception. My contention is that Charles Sanders Peirce’s little studied and less understood phenomenological vocabulary makes a significant contribution to meeting this challenge. I employ Peirce’s phenomenology to identify the structural isomorphism between seeing a scarlet red and hearing a trumpet’s blare. I begin by distinguishing between the vividness of an experience and the intensity of a quality. I (...)
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  45. Panos Theodorou (forthcoming). Pain, Pleasure, and the Intentionality of Emotions as Experiences of Values: A New Phenomenological Perspective. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-17.score: 21.0
    The article starts with a brief overview of the kinds of approaches that have been attempted for the presentation of Phenomenology’s view on the emotions. I then pass to Husserl’s unsatisfactory efforts to disclose the intentionality of emotions and their intentional correlation with values. Next, I outline the idea of a new, “normalized phenomenological” approach of emotions and values. Pleasure and pain, then, are first explored as affective feelings (reell lived-experiences). In the cases examined, it is shown that, primordially, (...)
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  46. David Michael Kleinberg-Levin (1985). The Body's Recollection of Being: Phenomenological Psychology and the Deconstruction of Nihilism. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 21.0
    Expands our understanding of the human potential of spiritual self-realization by interpreting it as the developing of a bodily-felt awareness informing our ...
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  47. Frederick J. Wertz (1993). Cognitive Psychology: A Phenomenological Critique. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):2-24.score: 21.0
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  48. Gordon Hull (forthcoming). Coding the Dictatorship of ‘the They:’ A Phenomenological Critique of Digital Rights Management. In J. Jeremy Wisnewski Mark Sanders (ed.), Ethics and Phenomenology. Lexington Books.score: 21.0
    This paper uses Heidegger’s discussion of artifacts in Being and Time to motivate a phenomenological critique of Digital Rights Management regimes such as the one that allows DVDs to require one to watch commercials and copyright notices. In the first section, I briefly sketch traditional ethical approaches to intellectual property and indicate the gap that a phenomenological approach can fill. In section 2, following Heidegger’s discussion in Being and Time, I analyze DRM technologies as exemplary of the breakdown (...)
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  49. Preben Bertelsen (1999). Development of Phenomenological Consciousness in Early Childhood. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):195-216.score: 21.0
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  50. Michael W. Barclay (2000). The Inadvertent Emergence of a Phenomenological Perspective in the Philosophy of Cognitive Psychology and Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):140-166.score: 21.0
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