Search results for 'Phenomenology and music' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rock Critics Need Bad Music (2004). I Like Bad Music.” That's My Usual Response to People Who Ask Me About My Musi. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge.score: 100.0
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  2. Pop Music (2004). Music Critics and Aestheticians Are, on the Surface, Advocates and Guardians of Good Music. But What Exactly is “Good. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge. 62.score: 100.0
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  3. Descriptive Phenomenology (2002). Descriptive Psychology or Descriptive Phenomenology. In Dermot Moran & Timothy Mooney (eds.), The Phenomenology Reader. Routledge. 51.score: 100.0
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  4. Transcendental Phenomenology (2003). Husserl's Notion of the Natural Attitude and the Shut to Transcendental Phenomenology. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Phenomenology World-Wide. Kluwer. 80--114.score: 100.0
     
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  5. Bruce Ellis Benson (2003). The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    This book is an important contribution to the philosophy of music. Whereas most books in this field focus on the creation and reproduction of music, Bruce Benson's concern is the phenomenology of music making as an activity. He offers the radical thesis that it is improvisation that is primary in the moment of music making. Succinct and lucid, the book brings together a wide range of musical examples from classical music, jazz, early music (...)
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  6. David Clarke (2011). Music, Phenomenology, Time Consciousness: Meditations After Husserl. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 51.0
    David Clarke examines the complex relationship between phenomenological and semiological understandings of music and consciousness through the window of time. He also explores the polar tension between Husserl's phenomenology and Derrida's critique of it, considering what the experience of music might have to offer in response to the crucial question of what is most primordial or essential to consciousness: the unceasing, differential movement of meaning, or some pure flow of subjectivity that underpins all our experience.
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  7. D. Lloyd (2013). The Music of Consciousness: Can Musical Form Harmonize Phenomenology and the Brain? Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):324-331.score: 48.0
    Context: Neurophenomenology lies at a rich intersection of neuroscience and lived human experience, as described by phenomenology. As a new discipline, it is open to many new questions, methods, and proposals. Problem: The best available scientific ontology for neurophenomenology is based in dynamical systems. However, dynamical systems afford myriad strategies for organizing and representing neurodynamics, just as phenomenology presents an array of aspects of experience to be captured. Here, the focus is on the pervasive experience of subjective time. (...)
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  8. Ruth Herbert (2011). Everyday Music Listening: Absorption, Dissociation and Trancing. Ashgate Pub. Co..score: 45.0
    Music and listening, music and consciousness -- Conceptualizing consciousness -- The phenomenology of everyday music listening experiences -- Absorption, dissociation and trancing -- Musical and non-musical trancing in daily life -- Imaginative involvement -- Musical and non-musical trancing : similarities and differences -- Experiencing life and art : ethological and evolutionary perspectives on -- Transformations of consciousness -- Everyday music listening experiences reframed.
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  9. Eugene Montague (2011). Phenomenology and the 'Hard Problem' of Consciousness and Music. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 29--46.score: 39.0
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  10. David Clarke (2011). Music, Phenomenology, Time. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 39.0
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  11. F. Joseph Smith (forthcoming). Toward a Phenomenology of Music: A Musician's Composition Journal. Philosophy of Music Education Review.score: 39.0
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  12. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2009). “What Has Coltrane to Do With Mozart: The Dynamism and Built-in Flexibility of Music”. Expositions 3:57-71.score: 36.0
    Although contemporary Western culture and criticism has usually valued composition over improvisation and placed the authority of a musical work with the written text rather than the performer, this essay posits these divisions as too facile to articulate the complex dynamics of making music in any genre or form. Rather it insists that music should be understood as pieces that are created with specific intentions by composers but which possess possibilities of interpretation that can only be brought out (...)
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  13. A. Gritten (2005). Review: The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):197-199.score: 36.0
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  14. M. Chatterjee (1971). Towards a Phenomenology of Time-Consciousness in Music. Diogenes 19 (74):49-56.score: 36.0
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  15. Jean G. Harrell (1990). Phenomenology of Film Music. Journal of Value Inquiry 14 (1):23-34.score: 36.0
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  16. Michael Christian Cifone (2014). Nothngness and Science (A Propadeutic). Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):251-275.score: 36.0
    We characterize science in terms of nihilism: the nihilism of science is something faced not in what science i mplies, but as the very essence of science as such. The nihilism of science is the birth of the truth of Nietzsche's announcement "God is dead" from within science as it must now face its repressed subjective core. But in truth, as the Psychoanalytic tradition has determined, it is subjectivity itself that is a bottomless searching-the subject is itself born from nothing. (...)
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  17. Roberto Miraglia (1998). U.S. Phenomenology of Music: A Critical Survey. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 9 (1-2):235-251.score: 36.0
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  18. Münir Beken (2008). Music Theory and Phenomenology of Musical Performance. A Case Study: Five Notes in Joel-Francois Durand's Un Feu Distinct. Analecta Husserliana 96:305-310.score: 36.0
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  19. Luminiţa Pogăceanu (2010). The Phenomenology of the Experience of Listening to Music with Understanding. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 9:323-328.score: 36.0
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  20. Sitansu Ray (2002). The Phenomenology of Music: A Vital Source of Tagore's Creativity. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), The Visible and the Invisible in the Interplay Between Philosophy, Literature, and Reality. Kluwer. 311--318.score: 36.0
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  21. Simon Høffding (2013). A Musical Exploration of Consciousness. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):877-882.score: 30.0
  22. Kristin Zeiler (forthcoming). A Philosophical Defense of the Idea That We Can Hold Each Other in Personhood: Intercorporeal Personhood in Dementia Care. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-11.score: 30.0
    Since John Locke, regnant conceptions of personhood in Western philosophy have focused on individual capabilities for complex forms of consciousness that involve cognition such as the capability to remember past events and one’s own past actions, to think about and identify oneself as oneself, and/or to reason. Conceptions of personhood such as Locke's qualify as cognition-oriented, and they often fail to acknowledge the role of embodiment for personhood. This article offers an alternative conception of personhood from within the tradition of (...)
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  23. Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.) (2005). The Phenomenology of Prayer. Fordham University Press.score: 27.0
    This collection of ground-breaking essays considers the many dimensions of prayer: how prayer relates us to the divine; prayer's ability to reveal what is essential about our humanity; the power of prayer to transform human desire and action; and the relation of prayer to cognition. It takes up the meaning of prayer from within a uniquely phenomenological point of view, demonstrating that the phenomenology of prayer is as much about the character and boundaries of phenomenological analysis as it is (...)
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  24. Wayne D. Bowman (1998). Philosophical Perspectives on Music. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Designed to introduce music students and musicians to the vitality of music philosophical discourse, Philosophical Perspectives on Music explores diverse accounts of the nature and value of music. It offers an accessible, even-handed consideration of philosophical orientations without advocating any single one, demonstrating that there are a number of ways in which music may reasonably be understood. This unique approach examines the strengths and advantages of each perspective as well as its inevitable shortcomings. From the (...)
     
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  25. Joel Krueger (2014). Affordances and the Musically Extended Mind. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 27.0
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  26. Alfred Schutz & Maurice Alexander Natanson (eds.) (1970). Phenomenology and Social Reality. The Hague,Nijhoff.score: 27.0
    Values and the scope of scientific inquiry, by M. Farber.--The phenomenology of epistemic claims: and its bearing on the essence of philosophy, by R. M. Zaner.--Problems of the Life-World, by A. Gurwitsch.--The Life-World and the particular sub-worlds, by W. Marx.--On the boundaries of the social world, by T. Luckmann.--Alfred Schutz on social reality and social science, by M. Natanson.--Homo oeconomicus and his class mates, by F. Machlup.--Toward a science of political economics, by A. Lowe.--Some notes on reality-orientation in contemporary (...)
     
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  27. Derek Matravers (2007). Expression in Music. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This is a critical review of the current state of the debate in the philosophy of music, and defends the author's view as the phenomenology of the experience.
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  28. Harris M. Berger (2009). Stance: Ideas About Emotion, Style, and Meaning for the Study of Expressive Culture. Wesleyan University Press.score: 24.0
    Locating stance -- Structures of stance in lived experience -- Stance and others, stance and lives -- The social life of stance and the politics of expressive culture.
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  29. Enzo Fantin (2007). Il Suono Vivente: Guida a Una Fenomenologia Della Musica. Le Cáriti.score: 24.0
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  30. Stephan Höllwerth (2007). Musikalisches Gestalten: Ein Beitrag Zur Phänomenologie der Interpretation Tonaler Musik. P. Lang.score: 24.0
    Grundlagen musikalischen Gestaltens. Das Gestalten von Musik ; Ontologie ; Psychologie ; Semiotik ; Pragmatik -- Musikalische Phänomenologie. Methode ; Umriss ; Musiktheorie ; Kritik -- Gestaltungsvariablen. Fundamente ; Elemente ; Synthese.
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  31. Marja-Leena Juntunen (2004). Embodiment in Dalcroze Eurhythmics. Oulun Yliopisto.score: 24.0
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  32. Erwin W. Straus & Richard Marion Griffith (eds.) (1970). Aisthesis and Aesthetics. Pittsburgh, Pa.,Duquesne University Press.score: 24.0
     
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  33. David Sudnow (1978). Ways of the Hand: The Organization of Improvised Conduct. Harvard University Press.score: 24.0
     
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  34. R. A. Telʹcharova-Kurenkova (2006). Fenomenologicheskai͡a Ėstetika Muzyki: Monografii͡a. Vladimirskiĭ Gos. Pedagogicheskiĭ Universitet.score: 24.0
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  35. Julia Annas (2008). The Phenomenology of Virtue. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):21-34.score: 21.0
    What is it like to be a good person? I examine and reject suggestions that this will involve having thoughts which have virtue or being a good person as part of their content, as well as suggestions that it might be the presence of feelings distinct from the virtuous person’s thoughts. Is there, then, anything after all to the phenomenology of virtue? I suggest that an answer is to be found in looking to Aristotle’s suggestion that virtuous activity is (...)
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  36. Alva Noë (2007). The Critique of Pure Phenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):231-245.score: 21.0
    The topic of this paper is phenomenology. How should we think of phenomenology – the discipline or activity of investigating experience itself – if phenomenology is to be a genuine source of knowledge? This is related to the question whether phenomenology can make a contribution to the empirical study of human or animal experience. My own view is that it can. But only if we make a fresh start in understanding what phenomenology is and can (...)
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  37. Dan Zahavi (2007). Killing the Straw Man: Dennett and Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):21-43.score: 21.0
    Can phenomenology contribute to the burgeoning science of consciousness? Dennett’s reply would probably be that it very much depends upon the type of phenomenology in question. In my paper I discuss the relation between Dennett’s heterophenomenology and the type of classical philosophical phenomenology that one can find in Husserl, Scheler and Merleau-Ponty. I will in particular be looking at Dennett’s criticism of classical phenomenology. How vulnerable is it to Dennett’s criticism, and how much of a challenge (...)
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  38. Uriah Kriegel (2011). Cognitive Phenomenology as the Basis of Unconscious Content. In T. Bayne & M. Montague (eds.), Cognitive Phenomenology. Oxford University Press. 79--102.score: 21.0
    Since the seventies, it has been customary to assume that intentionality is independent of consciousness. Recently, a number of philosophers have rejected this assumption, claiming intentionality is closely tied to consciousness, inasmuch as non- conscious intentionality in some sense depends upon conscious intentionality. Within this alternative framework, the question arises of how to account for unconscious intentionality, and different authors have offered different accounts. In this paper, I compare and contrast four possible accounts of unconscious intentionality, which I call potentialism, (...)
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  39. Dan Zahavi (2004). Phenomenology and the Project of Naturalization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):331-47.score: 21.0
    In recent years, more and more people have started talking about the necessity of reconciling phenomenology with the project of naturalization. Is it possible to bridge the gap between phenomenological analyses and naturalistic models of consciousness? Is it possible to naturalize phenomenology? Given the transcendental philosophically motivated anti-naturalism found in many phenomenologists such a naturalization proposal might seem doomed from the very start, but in this paper I will examine and evaluate some possible alternatives.
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  40. Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). The Character of Cognitive Phenomenology. In T. Breyer & C. Gutland (eds.), Phenomenology of Thinking. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Recent discussions of phenomenal consciousness have taken increased interest in the existence and scope of non-sensory types of phenomenology, notably so-called cognitive phenomenology. These discussions have been largely restricted, however, to the question of the existence of such a phenomenology. Little attention has been given to the character of cognitive phenomenology: what in fact is it like to engage in conscious cognitive activity? This paper offers an approach to this question. Focusing on the prototypical cognitive activity (...)
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  41. Uriah Kriegel (2008). Moral Phenomenology: Foundational Issues. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):1-19.score: 21.0
    In this paper, I address the what, the how, and the why of moral phenomenology. I consider first the question What is moral phenomenology?, secondly the question How to pursue moral phenomenology?, and thirdly the question Why pursue moral phenomenology? My treatment of these questions is preliminary and tentative, and is meant not so much to settle them as to point in their answers’ direction.
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  42. John Drummond (2008). Moral Phenomenology and Moral Intentionality. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):35-49.score: 21.0
    This paper distinguishes between two senses of the term “phenomenology”: a narrow sense (drawn from Nagel) and a broader sense (drawn from Husserl). It claims, with particular reference to the moral sphere, that the narrow meaning of moral phenomenology cannot stand alone, that is, that moral phenomenology in the narrow sense entails moral intentionality. The paper proceeds by examining different examples of the axiological and volitional experiences of both virtuous and dutiful agents, and it notes the correlation (...)
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  43. Jack Reynolds & Jon Roffe (2006). Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty: Immanence, Univocity and Phenomenology. Journal of the British Society of Phenomenology 37 (3):228-51.score: 21.0
    This paper will seek firstly to understand Deleuze’s main challenges to phenomenology, particularly as they are expressed in The Logic of Sense (1968) and What is Philosophy? (1991), although reference will also be made to Pure Immanence (1994) and Difference and Repetition (1968). We will then turn to a discussion of one of the few passages in which Deleuze (with Guattari) directly engages with Merleau-Ponty, which occurs in the chapter on art in What is Philosophy? In this text, he (...)
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  44. P. Sven Arvidson (2003). A Lexicon of Attention: From Cognitive Science to Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):99-132.score: 21.0
    This article tries to create a bridge of understanding between cognitive scientists and phenomenologists who work on attention. In light of a phenomenology of attention and current psychological and neuropsychological literature on attention, I translate and interpret into phenomenological terms 20 key cognitive science concepts as examined in the laboratory and used in leading journals. As a preface to the lexicon, I outline a phenomenology of attention, especially as a dynamic three-part structure, which I have freely amended from (...)
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  45. Amie L. Thomasson (2005). First-Person Knowledge in Phenomenology. In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 115--138.score: 21.0
    An account of the source of first-person knowledge is essential not just for phenomenology, but for anyone who takes seriously the apparent evidence that we each have a distinctive access to knowing what we experience. One standard way to account for the source of first-person knowledge is by appeal to a kind of inner observation of the passing contents of one’s own mind, and phenomenology is often thought to rely on introspection. I argue, however, that Husserl’s method of (...)
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  46. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (2008). Is Moral Phenomenology Unified? Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):85-97.score: 21.0
    In this short paper, I argue that the phenomenology of moral judgment is not unified across different areas of morality (involving harm, hierarchy, reciprocity, and impurity) or even across different relations to harm. Common responses, such as that moral obligations are experienced as felt demands based on a sense of what is fitting, are either too narrow to cover all moral obligations or too broad to capture anything important and peculiar to morality. The disunity of moral phenomenology is, (...)
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  47. Susan Pockett (2003). How Long is Now? Phenomenology and the Specious Present. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (1):55-68.score: 21.0
    The duration of “now” is shown to be important not only for an understanding of how conscious beings sense duration, but also for the validity of the phenomenological enterprise as Husserl conceived it. If “now” is too short, experiences can not be described before they become memories, which can be considered to be transcendent rather than immanent phenomena and therefore inadmissible as phenomenological data. Evidence concerning (a) the objective duration of sensations in various sensory modalities, (b) the time necessary for (...)
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  48. Charles Siewert (2007). In Favor of (Plain) Phenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):201-220.score: 21.0
    Plain phenomenology explains theoretically salient mental or psychological distinctions with an appeal to their first-person applications. But it does not assume (as does heterophenomenology) that warrant for such first-person judgment is derived from an explanatory theory constructed from the third-person perspective. Discussions in historical phenomenology can be treated as plain phenomenology. This is illustrated by a critical consideration of Brentano’s account of consciousness, drawing on some ideas in early Husserl. Dennett’s advocacy of heterophenomenology on the grounds of (...)
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  49. Michael Gill (2008). Variability and Moral Phenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):99-113.score: 21.0
    Many moral philosophers in the Western tradition have used phenomenological claims as starting points for philosophical inquiry; aspects of moral phenomenology have often been taken to be anchors to which any adequate account of morality must remain attached. This paper raises doubts about whether moral phenomena are universal and robust enough to serve the purposes to which moral philosophers have traditionally tried to put them. Persons’ experiences of morality may vary in a way that greatly limits the extent to (...)
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  50. Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons (2008). Prolegomena to a Future Phenomenology of Morals. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):115-131.score: 21.0
    Moral phenomenology is (roughly) the study of those features of occurrent mental states with moral significance which are accessible through direct introspection, whether or not such states possess phenomenal character – a what-it-is-likeness. In this paper, as the title indicates, we introduce and make prefatory remarks about moral phenomenology and its significance for ethics. After providing a brief taxonomy of types of moral experience, we proceed to consider questions about the commonality within and distinctiveness of such experiences, with (...)
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