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Profile: Phil Hutchinson (Manchester Metropolitan University)
  1. Phil Hutchinson (2011). The Philosopher's Task: Value‐Based Practice and Bringing to Consciousness Underlying Philosophical Commitments. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):999-1001.
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  2. Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read (2011). De‐Mystifying Tacit Knowing and Clues: A Comment on Henry Et Al. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):944-947.
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  3. Phil Hutchinson (2009). Emotion-Philosophy-Science. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
  4. Phil Hutchinson (2008). Shame and Philosophy: An Investigation in the Philosophy of Emotions and Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Experimental methods and conceptual confusion : philosophy, science, and what emotions really are -- To 'make our voices resonate' or 'to be silent'? : shame as fundamental ontology -- Emotion, cognition, and world -- Shame and world.
     
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  5. Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read (2008). Toward a Perspicuous Presentation of "Perspicuous Presentation". Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141–160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected in Baker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on "perspicuous presentations," we offer new criticisms of 'elucidatory' readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the 'perspicuous presentation' concept, as an achievement-term, rather than a kind of 'objective' mapping (...)
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  6. Phil Hutchinson (2007). What's the Point of Elucidation? Metaphilosophy 38 (5):691-713.
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  7. Phil Hutchinson (2006). Unsinnig: A Reply to Hutto. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):569 – 577.
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  8. Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read (2006). An Elucidatory Interpretation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus: A Critique of Daniel D. Hutto's and Marie McGinn's Reading of Tractatus 6.54. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):1 – 29.
    Much has been written on the relative merits of different readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The recent renewal of the debate has almost exclusively been concerned with variants of the ineffabilist (metaphysical) reading of TL-P - notable such readings have been advanced by Elizabeth Anscombe, P. M. S. Hacker and H. O. Mounce - and the recently advanced variants of therapeutic (resolute) readings - notable advocates of which are James Conant, Cora Diamond, Juliet Floyd and Michael Kremer. During this debate, (...)
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  9. Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read (2005). Review: Review Article: Whose Wittgenstein? [REVIEW] Philosophy 80 (313):432 - 455.
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  10. Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read (2005). Wittgenstein's Method: Neglected Aspects by Gordon Baker. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004 Pp. 328. £40.00 HB. (Hereafter: BWM). Wittgenstein's Copernican Revolution: The Question of Linguistic Idealism by Ilham Dilman. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002. Pp. 240. £52.50 HB. (Hereafter: DWCR) Wittgenstein: Connections and Controversies by P. M. S. Hacker. Oxford: Oxford University Press, (2001 [Pb 2004]). Pp. 400. £45.00 HB; £19.99 PB. (Hereafter: HWCC) Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: An Introduction by David G. Stern. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. 224. £40.00 HB; £10.99 PB. (Hereafter: SWPI). [REVIEW] Philosophy 80 (3):432-455.
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  11. Phil Hutchinson (2004). Steiner's Possession As It Were. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (3):245-265.
    Since the resurgence of interest in political philosophy in the early 1970s debates about freedom have been central. Throughout this period Hillel Steiner has proposed and defended the pure negative conception of freedom. This work is complemented by Ian Carter’s recent writings on freedom. Carter and Steiner advance a non-normative (empirical) conception of freedom employing tools from contemporary philosophy of action and language. In this article I seek to offer a deflationary critique of the Carter/Steiner position. My purpose is not (...)
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