Search results for 'Philip Anthony Stott' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.) (2000). Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press.score: 870.0
    Political ecology has developed as an academic discipline in reaction to the increased concern of nations and individuals about humanity's adverse impact on the environment and the ways international bodies have moved to counter this impact. This new text draws together international experts at the cutting edge of this new field to focus on real world examples of problems and the tension between developed and developing states.
     
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  2. Anthony Blunt (1940). El Greco's "Dream of Philip II": An Allegory of the Holy League. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 3 (1/2):58-69.score: 36.0
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  3. Anthony Egan (2012). Religious Tolerance Through Humility: Thinking with Philip Quinn. Edited by James Kraft & David Basinger. Pp. Ix, 130, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2008, $88.95. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (3):540-541.score: 36.0
  4. Philip Bartholomew (1986). The British Fasti Anthony R. Birley: The Fasti of Roman Britain. Pp. Xii + 476. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981. £30. The Classical Review 36 (02):277-282.score: 36.0
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  5. Anthony G. Greenwald, Bernard J. Baars, John R. Pani, Mahzarin R. Banaji, J. Passchier, William P. Banks, Elizabeth Ligon Bjork, A. E. Bonebakker, Timothy L. Hubbard & Roger Ratcliff (1996). A G McKoon, Gail, 500 Merikle, Philip M., 525 Andrade, Jackie, 562 Goshen-Gottstein, Yonatan, Mori, Monica, 91 117 Graf, Peter, 91 B P. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 5:606.score: 36.0
     
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  6. Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack (2006). The Phenomenal Stance. Philosophical Studies 127 (1):59-85.score: 24.0
    Cognitive science is shamelessly materialistic. It maintains that human beings are nothing more than complex physical systems, ultimately and completely explicable in mechanistic terms. But this conception of humanity does not ?t well with common sense. To think of the creatures we spend much of our day loving, hating, admiring, resenting, comparing ourselves to, trying to understand, blaming, and thanking -- to think of them as mere mechanisms seems at best counterintuitive and unhelpful. More often it may strike us as (...)
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  7. Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack (2006). An Unconstrained Mind: Explaining Belief in the Afterlife. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):484-484.score: 24.0
    Bering contends that belief in the afterlife is explained by the simulation constraint hypothesis: the claim that we cannot imagine what it is like to be dead. This explanation suffers from some difficulties. First, it implies the existence of a corresponding belief in the “beforelife.” Second, a simpler explanation will suffice. Rather than appeal to constraints on our thoughts about death, we suggest that belief in the afterlife can be better explained by the lack of such constraints.
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  8. James Fieser (ed.) (2001). Early Responses to Hume's Writings on Religion. Thoemmes Press.score: 24.0
    In the past 250 years, David Hume probably had a greater impact on the field of philosophy of religion than any other single philosopher. He relentlessly attacked the standard proofs for God's existence, traditional notions of God's nature and divine governance, the connection between morality and religion, and the rationality of belief in miracles. He also advanced radical theories of the origin of religious ideas, grounding such notions in human psychology rather than in divine reality. In the last decade of (...)
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  9. Pascal Boyer, Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack (2005). Varieties of Self-Systems Worth Having. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):647-660.score: 24.0
  10. Anthony I. Jack & Philip Robbins (2012). The Phenomenal Stance Revisited. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (3):383-403.score: 24.0
    In this article, we present evidence of a bidirectional coupling between moral concern and the attribution of properties and states that are associated with experience (e.g., conscious awareness, feelings). This coupling is also shown to be stronger with experience than for the attribution of properties and states more closely associated with agency (e.g., free will, thoughts). We report the results of four studies. In the first two studies, we vary the description of the mental capacities of a creature, and assess (...)
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  11. Christopher Summerfield, Anthony Ian Jack & Adrian Philip Burgess (2002). Induced Gamma Activity is Associated with Conscious Awareness of Pattern Masked Nouns. International Journal of Psychophysiology 44 (2):93-100.score: 24.0
  12. Anthony I. Jack & Philip Robbins (2004). The Illusory Triumph of Machine Over Mind: Wegner's Eliminativism and the Real Promise of Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):665-666.score: 24.0
    Wegner's thesis that the experience of will is an illusion is not just wrong, it is an impediment to progress in psychology. We discuss two readings of Wegner's thesis and find that neither can motivate his larger conclusion. Wegner thinks science requires us to dismiss our experiences. Its real promise is to help us to make better sense of them.
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  13. Richard McNeill Douglas (2009). The Green Backlash: Scepticism or Scientism? Social Epistemology 23 (2):145 – 163.score: 24.0
    Speakers of the “green backlash” movement frequently advertise their approach as one of rigorous scepticism, and themselves as defenders of scientific method. In reality, their use of scepticism is often highly flawed and inconsistent; this is clearly seen in case examples focusing on Philip Stott's arguments on climate change, and Julian Simon's arguments on physical limits to growth. What this discourse illustrates is that sceptical language is often used as a rhetorical tool for advancing an underlying political philosophy (...)
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  14. Aristotle (2013). Poetics. Oup Oxford.score: 24.0
    A founding text of European aestheticism and literary criticism, Poetics underpins our moden understanding of imaginative writing. Anthony Kenny's new translation is accompanied by associated material from Plato, Sir Philip Sidney, P. B. Shelley, and Dorothy L. Sayers and a wide-ranging introduction.
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  15. Anthony Philip A. Hutchinson (2007). What's the Point of Elucidation? Metaphilosophy 38 (5):691-713.score: 24.0
    A. P. A. Hutchinson. What's the Point of Elucidation? Metaphilosophy, 2007, vol. 38, no. 5, pages 691-713. Published by and copyright Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. The definitive version of this article is available from http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/.
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  16. Eduardo Salles O. Barra (2010). Valores epistêmicos no naturalismo normativos de Philip Kitcher. Principia 4 (1):1-26.score: 24.0
    This paper aims at analyzing Philip Kitcher's naturalistic epistemology, particularly its normative features, which are viewed as a sort of response to negative assessments made by radical naturalists on the plurality of epistemic values. According to them such values are ineffective for normative ends, e.g. theory choice. Differently from that quite excessive evaluation, Kitcher argues rather for explanatory unity as the most important and universal epistemic value. Even though Kitcher's arguments are sound, there remains some serious gaps as regards (...)
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  17. Mihaela Frunza (2010). Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitism. Etica într-o lume a strainilor/ Cosmopolitanism. Ethics in a World of Strangers. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):249-252.score: 24.0
    KWAME ANTHONY APPIAH, COSMOPOLITISM. ETICA ÎNTR-O LUME A STRĂINILOR COSMOPOLITANISM. ETHICS IN A WORLD OF STRANGERS, BUCUREŞTI: ANDRECO EDUCATIONAL GRUP, 2007.
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  18. Neil Pickering (2014). A Random Blend: The Self in Philip Larkin's Poems “Ambulances” and “The Building”. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):163-170.score: 24.0
    In two of his great poems, “Ambulances” and “The Building,” Philip Larkin considers a deep fear about human individuality. The fear is that the human self is contingent and disjunctive, lacking any integrity or unity. The arrival of an ambulance on an urban curb and a visit to the hospital are the occasion of reflection on this form of human fragility. But more significant, the ambulance and the hospital are imagined as contexts in which the contingency of the human (...)
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  19. Antony Black, Brett Bowden, Bruce Buchan, Joseph Chan, Fred Dallmayr, Nelly Lahoud, Cary J. Nederman, Philip Nel, Makarand Parajape, Anthony Parel, Vicki A. Spencer, Alistair Swale & Peter Zarrow (2008). Western Political Thought in Dialogue with Asia. Lexington Books.score: 24.0
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  20. Deanne Bogdan, David Carr, Iris M. Yob, Anthony J. Palmer & Philip Alperson (2010). 7. in memoriam. Philosophy of Music Education Review 18 (2).score: 24.0
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  21. Barbara Brierley, Nicholas Medford, Philip Shaw & Anthony S. David (2007). Emotional Memory for Words: Separating Content and Context. Cognition and Emotion 21 (3):495-521.score: 24.0
  22. Owen Flanagan Churchland, John Gabrieli, Melvyn Goodale, Anthony Greenwald, Valerie Hardcastle, Larry Jacoby, Christof Koch, Philip Merikle, David Milner & Daniel Schacter (1997). What Does Implicit Cognition Tell Us About Consciousness? Consciousness and Cognition 6:148.score: 24.0
     
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  23. Philip C. J. Donoghue, Anthony Graham & Robert N. Kelsh (2008). The Origin and Evolution of the Neural Crest. Bioessays 30 (6):530-541.score: 24.0
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  24. Anthony Jack, Philip Robbins & and Andreas Roepstorff, The Genuine Problem of Consciousness.score: 24.0
    Those who are optimistic about the prospects of a science of consciousness, and those who believe that it lies beyond the reach of standard scientific methods, have something in common: both groups view consciousness as posing a special challenge for science. In this paper, we take a close look at the nature of this challenge. We show that popular conceptions of the problem of consciousness, epitomized by David Chalmers’ formulation of the ‘hard problem’, can be best explained as a cognitive (...)
     
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  25. Ron Johnston, FBA (ed.) (2009). Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 161, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows, VIII. OUP/British Academy.score: 24.0
    John Lloyd Ackrill 1921-2007; Maurice Warwick Beresford 1920-2005; Malcolm MacNaughtan Bowie 1943-2007; Peter Astbury Brunt 1917-2005; Norman Rufus Colin Cohn 1915-2007; John Anthony Crook 1921-2007; Robert Rees Davies 1938-2005; David Fairweather Foxon 1923-2001; Terence Wilmot Hutchison 1912-2007; Philip James Jones 1921-2006; Michael Vincent Levey 1927-2008; John Macquarrie 1919-2007; Charles Francis Digby Moule 1908-2007; Anthony David Nuttall 1937-2007; Alan William Raitt 1930-2006; Joseph Burney Trapp 1925-2005; William Watson 1917-2007; Bryan Ronald Wilson 1926-2004.
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  26. Tilo T. J. Kircher, Carl Senior, Mary L. Phillips, Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, Philip J. Benson, Edward T. Bullmore, Mick Brammer, Andrew Simmons, Mathias Bartels & Anthony S. David (2001). Recognizing One's Own Face. Cognition 78 (1):B1-B15.score: 24.0
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  27. James W. Haag (2006). Between Physicalism and Mentalism: Philip Clayton on Mind and Emergence. Zygon 41 (3):633-647.score: 21.0
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  28. Antje Jackelen (2006). Emergence Everywhere?! Reflections on Philip Clayton's Mind and Emergence. Zygon 41 (3):623-632.score: 21.0
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  29. Willem B. Drees (1999). God and Contemporary Science: Philip Clayton's Defense of Panentheism. Zygon 34 (3):515-525.score: 21.0
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  30. Anthony Savile (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Anthony Savile. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):55–74.score: 21.0
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be exercised in (...)
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  31. Philip Rolnick (2002). Regarding Philip Clayton. Tradition and Discovery 29 (3):5-6.score: 21.0
    This brief opening for a special issue of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical on Philip Clayton’s thought and its connection with that of Michael Polany introduces Clayton’s essay and the responses by Martinez Hewlett, Gregory R. Peterson, Andy F. Sanders and Waler B. Gulick.
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  32. Anthony King (1999). Legitimating Post-Fordism: A Critique of Anthony Giddens' Later Works. Telos 1999 (115):61-77.score: 21.0
    Introduction Although Anthony Giddens describes his approach as “social” rather than “critical” theory, and although there is little obvious Frankfurt School influence in his writing, he believes “social theory is inevitably critical theory.”1 While he might aim at such a critical position, it is far from obvious that he succeeds. On the contrary, his later writings have become an apology for the status quo.2 Failing to consider his prejudices, perhaps because he thinks critique is inevitable, Giddens has increasingly vindicated (...)
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  33. Marco Barducci (2011). Hugo Grotius and the English Republic: The Writings of Anthony Ascham, 1648-1650. Grotiana 32 (1):40-63.score: 21.0
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  34. Anthony C. Thiselton (2006). Thiselton on Hermeneutics: The Collected Works and New Essays of Anthony Thiselton. William B. Eerdmans Pub..score: 21.0
    Graham N. Stanton, University of Cambridge ?Anthony Thiselton is one of our leading theologians, equally at home in both New Testament studies and in philosophical and theological hermeneutics, and a collection of this major articles will ...
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  35. Samuel Cohn (2006). Anthony F. D'Elia, The Renaissance of Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Italy. (Harvard Historical Studies, 146.) Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 2004. Pp. Xi, 262. $49.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):169-170.score: 21.0
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  36. Mikael Janvid (2013). Anthony Brueckner Essays on Skepticism. Oxford University Press, 2010. Xi + 396 Pp. Isbn 978‐0‐19‐958586‐1. [REVIEW] Theoria 79 (4):378-382.score: 21.0
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  37. Caroline Kraus Luvizotto (2013). A Racionalização das Tradições na Modernidade: o Diálogo Entre Anthony Giddens e Jürgen Habermas. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (1):245-258.score: 21.0
    Partindo das reflexões de Habermas e sua concepção de modernidade, compreendida como um projeto inacabado, Giddens salienta que, em todas as sociedades, a manutenção da identidade pessoal e sua conexão com identidades sociais mais amplas é um requisito primordial para a segurança ontológica. Para alcançar a segurança ontológica, a modernidade teve que (re)inventar tradições e se afastar de "tradições genuínas", isto é, aqueles valores radicalmente vinculados ao passado pré moderno. Este é um caráter de descontinuidade da modernidade - a separação (...)
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  38. Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins (2011). The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08. Broadview Press.score: 21.0
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that thinking (...)
     
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  39. Sven Nyholm (forthcoming). Just Freedom? Philip Pettit. 2014. Just Freedom: A Moral Compass for a Complex World, Norton Books, 288 Pp. [REVIEW] Res Publica.score: 21.0
    In Just Freedom, Pettit presents a powerful new statement and defense of the traditional “republican” conception of liberty or freedom. And he claims that freedom can serve as an ecumenical value with broad appeal, which we can put at the basis of a distinctively republican theory of justice. That is, Pettit argues that this “conception of freedom as non-domination allows us to see all issues of justice as issues, ultimately, of what freedom demands.” It is not, however, clear that liberty (...)
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  40. Helen E. Longino (2002). Science and the Common Good: Thoughts on Philip Kitcher's Science, Truth, and Democracy. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):560-568.score: 18.0
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher develops the notion of well-ordered science: scientific inquiry whose research agenda and applications (but not methods) are subject to public control guided by democratic deliberation. Kitcher's primary departure from his earlier views involves rejecting the idea that there is any single standard of scientific significance. The context-dependence of scientific significance opens up many normative issues to philosophical investigation and to resolution through democratic processes. Although some readers will feel Kitcher has not (...)
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  41. Philip Kitcher, Philip Kitcher.score: 18.0
    Philosophy is often conceived in the Anglophone world today as a subject that focuses on questions in particular ‘‘core areas,’’ pre-eminently epistemology and metaphysics. This article argues that the contemporary conception is a new version of the scholastic ‘‘self-indulgence for the few’’ of which Dewey complained nearly a century ago. Philosophical questions evolve, and a first task for philosophers is to address issues that arise for their own times. The article suggests that a renewal of philosophy today should turn the (...)
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  42. Daniel Attala Pochon (1997). Dos escepticismos y desafío escéptico en The Advancement of Science, de Philip Kitcher (Two Skepticism and Skeptic Challenge in Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science). Theoria 12 (2):317-335.score: 18.0
    En este artículo me propongo analizar el punto de partida epistemológico de un reciente libro de Philip Kitcher (The Advancement of Science) a través de su discusión con las concepciónes ‘escépticas’. Podemos distinguir entre dos tipos de escepticismo en Ia trama deI libro de Kitcher: uno débil y otro radical. Intentamos difinir el tipo de realismo que Kitcher defiende, para finalmente mostrar que tal tipo de realismo es posible para Kitcher en Ia medida que no toma en cuenta el (...)
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  43. Michael J. McNeal (2013). Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence by Philip J. Kain (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):123-125.score: 18.0
    In Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence, Philip J. Kain makes a compelling case for taking Nietzsche’s concern with the subject of horror seriously and then challenges his conclusions about it. A corollary of existence, horror is an ineliminable part of being human. Our experience of horror prompts reflection on life and the act of philosophizing. Arguing it is a formative yet often overlooked theme in Nietzsche’s oeuvre, Kain recognizes that the experience of horror is central to “Nietzsche’s vision” (...)
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  44. Anthony John Patrick Kenny (1971). A Reply by Anthony Kenny. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4):497-498.score: 18.0
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  45. Paul E. Griffiths, The Fearless Vampire Conservator: Philip Kitcher, Genetic Determinism and the Informational Gene.score: 18.0
    Genetic determinism is the idea that many significant human characteristics are rendered inevitable by the presence of certain genes. The psychologist Susan Oyama has famously compared arguing against genetic determinism to battling the undead. Oyama suggests that genetic determinism is inherent in the way we currently represent genes and what genes do. As long as genes are represented as containing information about how the organism will develop, they will continue to be regarded as determining causes no matter how much evidence (...)
     
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  46. Charles T. Wolfe (2007). “Determinism/Spinozism in the Radical Enlightenment: The Cases of Anthony Collins and Denis Diderot”. International Review of Eighteenth-Century Studies 1 (1):37-51.score: 18.0
    In his Philosophical Inquiry concerning Human Liberty (1717), the English deist Anthony Collins proposed a complete determinist account of the human mind and action, partly inspired by his mentor Locke, but also by elements from Bayle, Leibniz and other Continental sources. It is a determinism which does not neglect the question of the specific status of the mind but rather seeks to provide a causal account of mental activity and volition in particular; it is a ‘volitional determinism’. Some decades (...)
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  47. Liane Young & Rebecca Saxe (2010). It's Not Just What You Do, but What's on Your Mind: A Review of Kwame Anthony Appiah's “Experiments in Ethics”. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 3 (3):201-207.score: 18.0
    What is the impact of science on philosophy? In “Experiments in Ethics”, Kwame Anthony Appiah addresses this question for morality and ethics. Appiah suggests that scientific results may undermine moral intuitions by undermining our confidence in the actual sources of our intuitions, or by invalidating our factual assumptions about the causes of human behavior. Appiah worries that scientific results showing situational causes on human behavior force us to abandon the intuition, formalized in virtue ethics, that what matters is “who (...)
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  48. William Uzgalis (2009). Anthony Collins on the Emergence of Consciousness and Personal Identity. Philosophy Compass 4 (2):363-379.score: 18.0
    The correspondence between Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins of 1706–8, while not well known, is a spectacularly good debate between a dualist and a materialist over the possibility of giving a materialist account of consciousness and personal identity. This article puts the Clarke Collins Correspondence in a broader context in which it can be better appreciated, noting that it is really a debate between John Locke and Anthony Collins on one hand, and Samuel Clarke and Joseph Butler on (...)
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  49. Dan Demetriou (2013). The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen, by Kwame Anthony Appiah. Mind 122 (486):fzt064.score: 18.0
    Honor has been in disrepute among intellectuals for almost a century now. The standard explanation for honor’s demise is its role in driving young men and their countries to surpass the limits of acceptable human slaughter in the First World War, the trenches of which became ‘a mass grave for honor’ (Welsh 2008: x). Academic interest in honor revived in the 1950s among anthropologists and sociologists, where it was treated with a studied moral distance. Literary scholars, historians, and political scientists (...)
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