Search results for 'Philip Barnes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jonathan Barnes, Benjamin Morison & Katerina Ierodiakonou (eds.) (2011). Episteme, Etc.: Essays in Honour of Jonathan Barnes. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    Sixteen authors, including some of the most distinguished scholars of our time, present essays which together reflect the impressive scope of Jonathan Barnes's contributions to philosophy, and in particular to the study of ancient philosophy. Six are on knowledge, five on logic and metaphysics, five on ethics.
     
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  2. Philip Barnes (2006). The Misrepresentation of Religion in Modern British (Religious) Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (4):395 - 411.score: 120.0
    The purpose of this paper is to articulate a new perspective on British multi-faith religious education that both complements and, in part, subsumes existing critiques. My argument, while controversial, is straightforward: it is that British religious education has misrepresented the nature of religion in efforts to commend itself as contributing to the social aims of education, as these are typically framed in liberal democratic societies. Contemporary multi-faith religious education is placed in context and its underlying theological and philosophical commitments identified (...)
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  3. Jonathan Barnes (1977). The Epinomis Leonardo Tarán: Academica: Plato, Philip of Opus, and the Pseudo-Platonic Epinomis. Pp. Viii + 417. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1975. Cloth, $20. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (02):170-171.score: 120.0
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  4. L. Philip Barnes (2002). Forgiveness, the Moral Law and Education: A Reply to Patricia White. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (4):529–544.score: 120.0
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  5. L. Philip Barnes (2007). Michael Hand, Is Religious Education Possible? Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (1):63-70.score: 120.0
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  6. L. Philip Barnes (2011). Reconciling Enemies: Righteousness and Peace in Northern Ireland. Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (2):183-198.score: 120.0
    The purpose of this paper is to articulate a Christian model of social and political engagement and to illustrate its appropriateness and fruitfulness through its application to the post-conflict situation in Northern Ireland. The argument is structured around three propositions, the implications of which are explored in a final fourth section: (1) that political forgiveness is an inappropriate model of Christian social and political engagement; (2) that Christians should seek justice/ righteousness in the public realm; (3) that Christian commitment and (...)
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  7. L. Philip Barnes (1990). Relativism, Ineffability, and the Appeal to Experience: A Reply to the Myth Makers. Modern Theology 7 (1):101-114.score: 120.0
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  8. Jonathan Barnes (2007/2009). Truth, Etc.: Six Lectures on Ancient Logic. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Truth, etc. is a wide-ranging study of ancient logic based upon the John Locke lectures given by the eminent philosopher Jonathan Barnes in Oxford. The book presupposes no knowledge of logic and no skill in ancient languages: all ancient texts are cited in English translation; and logical symbols and logical jargon are avoided so far as possible. Anyone interested in ancient philosophy, or in logic and its history, will find much to learn and enjoy here.
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  9. Jonathan Barnes (2001). Early Greek Philosophy. Penguin Books.score: 60.0
    This anthology looks at the early sages of Western philosophy and science who paved the way for Plato and Aristotle and their successors. Democritus's atomic theory of matter, Zeno's dazzling "proofs" that motion is impossible, Pythagorean insights into mathematics, Heraclitus's haunting and enigmatic epigrams-all form part of a revolution in human thought that relied on reasoning, forged the first scientific vocabulary, and laid the foundations of Western philosophy. Jonathan Barnes has painstakingly brought together the surviving Presocratic fragments in their (...)
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  10. Jonathan Barnes (1990). The Toils of Scepticism. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In the works of Sextus Empiricus, scepticism is presented in its most elaborate and challenging form. This book investigates - both from an exegetical and from a philosophical point of view - the chief argumentative forms which ancient scepticism developed. Thus the particular focus is on the Agrippan aspect of Sextus' Pyrrhonism. Barnes gives a lucid explanation and analysis of these arguments, both individually and as constituent parts of a sceptical system. For, taken together, these forms amount to a (...)
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  11. Annette Barnes (1997). Seeing Through Self-Deception. New York: Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    What is it to deceive someone? And how is it possible to deceive oneself? Does self-deception require that people be taken in by a deceitful strategy that they know is deceitful? The literature is divided between those who argue that self-deception is intentional and those who argue that it is non-intentional. In this study, Annette Barnes offers a challenge to both the standard characterisation of other-deception and current characterizations of self-deception, examining the available explanations and exploring such questions as (...)
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  12. Barry Barnes (2000). Understanding Agency: Social Theory and Responsible Action. Sage.score: 60.0
    Is human freedom and choice exaggerated in recent social theory? Should agency be the central in sociology? In this, penetrating and assured book, one of the leading commentators in the field asks where social theory is going. Barnes argues that social theory has taken the wrong turn in over-stating individual freedom. The result is that social contexts in which all individual actions are situated, is dangerously under-theorized. Barnes calls for a form of social theory that recognizes that sociability (...)
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  13. Eric Barnes (1992). Explanatory Unification and the Problem of Asymmetry. Philosophy of Science 59 (4):558-571.score: 60.0
    Philip Kitcher has proposed a theory of explanation based on the notion of unification. Despite the genuine interest and power of the theory, I argue here that the theory suffers from a fatal deficiency: It is intrinsically unable to account for the asymmetric structure of explanation, and thus ultimately falls prey to a problem similar to the one which beset Hempel's D-N model. I conclude that Kitcher is wrong to claim that one can settle the issue of an argument's (...)
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  14. Jonathan Barnes (2000). Aristotle: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The influence of Aristotle, the prince of philosophers, on the intellectual history of the West is second to none. In this book, Jonathan Barnes examines Aristotle's scientific researches, his discoveries in logic and his metaphysical theories, his work in psychology and in ethics and politics, and his ideas about art and poetry, placing his teachings in their historical context.
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  15. Eric Barnes (1995). Truthlikeness, Translation, and Approximate Causal Explanation. Philosophy of Science 62 (2):215-226.score: 60.0
    D. Miller's demonstrations of the language dependence of truthlikeness raise a profound problem for the claim that scientific progress is objective. In two recent papers (Barnes 1990, 1991) I argue that the objectivity of progress may be grounded on the claim that the aim of science is not merely truth but knowledge; progress thus construed is objective in an epistemic sense. In this paper I construct a new solution to Miller's problem grounded on the notion of "approximate causal explanation" (...)
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  16. Michael Hand (2007). Is Religious Education Possible? A Response to Philip Barnes. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (1):71-75.score: 45.0
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  17. Stephen Barnes (2002). Teaching Plato's Cave. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 2:6-7.score: 40.0
    Barnes focuses and examines Plato’s ideals on life through “Allegory of the Cave”. The nature of selfhood, moral/ political issues, and enlightenment demonstrate in any classroom the alternatives to a dry session on philosophy to young children through an engaging discussion.
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  18. Jonathan Barnes (2012). Logical Matters. Clarendon Press.score: 40.0
    This volume presents 27 essays on logic in ancient philosophy by Jonathan Barnes, one of the most admired philosophers of his generation.
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  19. Jonathan Barnes (ed.) (2003). Porphyry's Introduction. Clarendon Press.score: 40.0
    The Introduction to philosophy written by Porphyry at the end of the second century AD is the most successful work of its kind ever to have been published. It was translated into most respectable languages, and for a millennium and a half every student of philosophy read it as his first text in the subject. Porphyry's aim was modest: he intended to explain the meaning of five terms, 'genus', 'species', 'difference', 'property', and 'accident' - terms which he took to be (...)
     
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  20. Eduardo Salles O. Barra (2010). Valores epistêmicos no naturalismo normativos de Philip Kitcher. Principia 4 (1):1-26.score: 18.0
    This paper aims at analyzing Philip Kitcher's naturalistic epistemology, particularly its normative features, which are viewed as a sort of response to negative assessments made by radical naturalists on the plurality of epistemic values. According to them such values are ineffective for normative ends, e.g. theory choice. Differently from that quite excessive evaluation, Kitcher argues rather for explanatory unity as the most important and universal epistemic value. Even though Kitcher's arguments are sound, there remains some serious gaps as regards (...)
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  21. James W. Haag (2006). Between Physicalism and Mentalism: Philip Clayton on Mind and Emergence. Zygon 41 (3):633-647.score: 15.0
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  22. Anna Strhan (2010). A Religious Education Otherwise? An Examination and Proposed Interruption of Current British Practice. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):23-44.score: 15.0
    This paper examines the recent shift towards the dominance of the study of philosophy of religion, ethics and critical thinking within religious education in Britain. It explores the impact of the critical realist model, advocated by Andrew Wright and Philip Barnes, in response to prior models of phenomenological religious education, in order to expose the ways in which both approaches can lead to a distorted understanding of the nature of religion. Although the writing of Emmanuel Levinas has been (...)
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  23. Antje Jackelen (2006). Emergence Everywhere?! Reflections on Philip Clayton's Mind and Emergence. Zygon 41 (3):623-632.score: 15.0
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  24. Willem B. Drees (1999). God and Contemporary Science: Philip Clayton's Defense of Panentheism. Zygon 34 (3):515-525.score: 15.0
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  25. Philip Rolnick (2002). Regarding Philip Clayton. Tradition and Discovery 29 (3):5-6.score: 15.0
    This brief opening for a special issue of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical on Philip Clayton’s thought and its connection with that of Michael Polany introduces Clayton’s essay and the responses by Martinez Hewlett, Gregory R. Peterson, Andy F. Sanders and Waler B. Gulick.
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  26. Helen E. Longino (2002). Science and the Common Good: Thoughts on Philip Kitcher's Science, Truth, and Democracy. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):560-568.score: 12.0
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher develops the notion of well-ordered science: scientific inquiry whose research agenda and applications (but not methods) are subject to public control guided by democratic deliberation. Kitcher's primary departure from his earlier views involves rejecting the idea that there is any single standard of scientific significance. The context-dependence of scientific significance opens up many normative issues to philosophical investigation and to resolution through democratic processes. Although some readers will feel Kitcher has not (...)
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  27. Philip Kitcher, Philip Kitcher.score: 12.0
    Philosophy is often conceived in the Anglophone world today as a subject that focuses on questions in particular ‘‘core areas,’’ pre-eminently epistemology and metaphysics. This article argues that the contemporary conception is a new version of the scholastic ‘‘self-indulgence for the few’’ of which Dewey complained nearly a century ago. Philosophical questions evolve, and a first task for philosophers is to address issues that arise for their own times. The article suggests that a renewal of philosophy today should turn the (...)
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  28. Daniel Attala Pochon (1997). Dos escepticismos y desafío escéptico en The Advancement of Science, de Philip Kitcher (Two Skepticism and Skeptic Challenge in Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science). Theoria 12 (2):317-335.score: 12.0
    En este artículo me propongo analizar el punto de partida epistemológico de un reciente libro de Philip Kitcher (The Advancement of Science) a través de su discusión con las concepciónes ‘escépticas’. Podemos distinguir entre dos tipos de escepticismo en Ia trama deI libro de Kitcher: uno débil y otro radical. Intentamos difinir el tipo de realismo que Kitcher defiende, para finalmente mostrar que tal tipo de realismo es posible para Kitcher en Ia medida que no toma en cuenta el (...)
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  29. Jennifer Wilson Mulnix (2011). Explanatory Unification and Scientific Understanding. Acta Philosophica 20 (2):383 - 404.score: 12.0
    This paper represents a response to the criticisms made by Eric Barnes in “Explanatory Unification and the Problem of Asymmetry” and “Explanatory Unification and Scientific Understanding” against the thesis of Explanatory Unification. This paper responds to Barnes‟ two main criticisms, that of derivational skepticism and causal asymmetry, and successfully refutes his objections. This paper also defends the plausibility of the unificationist account of scientific explanation because of its ability to render coherent the notion of scientific understanding, focusing in (...)
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  30. Paul E. Griffiths, The Fearless Vampire Conservator: Philip Kitcher, Genetic Determinism and the Informational Gene.score: 12.0
    Genetic determinism is the idea that many significant human characteristics are rendered inevitable by the presence of certain genes. The psychologist Susan Oyama has famously compared arguing against genetic determinism to battling the undead. Oyama suggests that genetic determinism is inherent in the way we currently represent genes and what genes do. As long as genes are represented as containing information about how the organism will develop, they will continue to be regarded as determining causes no matter how much evidence (...)
     
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  31. Michael J. McNeal (2013). Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence by Philip J. Kain (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):123-125.score: 12.0
    In Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence, Philip J. Kain makes a compelling case for taking Nietzsche’s concern with the subject of horror seriously and then challenges his conclusions about it. A corollary of existence, horror is an ineliminable part of being human. Our experience of horror prompts reflection on life and the act of philosophizing. Arguing it is a formative yet often overlooked theme in Nietzsche’s oeuvre, Kain recognizes that the experience of horror is central to “Nietzsche’s vision” (...)
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  32. Dion Scott-Kakures (2001). High Anxiety: Barnes on What Moves the Unwelcome Believer. Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):313 – 326.score: 12.0
    Wishful thinking and self-deception are instances of motivated believing. According to an influential view, the motivated believer is moved by the pursuit of pleasure and the avoidance of pain; i.e. the motive of the motivated believer is strictly hedonic--typically, the reduction of anxiety. This anxiety reduction account would, however, appear to face a serious challenge: cases of unwelcome motivated believing [Barnes (1997) Seeing through self-deception, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Scott-Kakures (2000) Motivated believing: wishful and unwelcome, Nous, 34, 348-375] or (...)
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  33. Philip Mirowski (2004). The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.score: 12.0
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge‘ is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy‘ are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the philosophy of science tend to be (...)
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  34. M. Solomon (1995). Legend Naturalism and Scientific Progress: An Essay on Philip Kitcher's the Advancement of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):205-218.score: 12.0
    Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science sets out, programmatically, a new naturalistic view of science as a process of building consensus practices. Detailed historical case studies--centrally, the Darwinian revolution--are intended to support this view. I argue that Kitcher's expositions in fact support a more conservative view, that I dub 'Legend Naturalism'. Using four historical examples which increasingly challenge Kitcher's discussions, I show that neither Legend Naturalism, nor the less conservative programmatic view, gives an adequate account of scientific progress. (...)
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  35. Jeremy R. Simon (2006). The Proper Ends of Science: Philip Kitcher, Science, and the Good. Philosophy of Science 73 (2):194-214.score: 12.0
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher challenges the view that science has a single, context‐independent, goal, and that the pursuit of this goal is essentially immune from moral critique. He substitutes a context‐dependent account of science’s goal, and shows that this account subjects science to moral evaluation. I argue that Kitcher’s approach must be modified, as his account of science ultimately must be explicated in terms of moral concepts. I attempt, therefore, to give an account of science’s goal (...)
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  36. James Kraft (2006). Philip Quinn's Contribution to the Epistemic Challenge of Religious Diversity. Religious Studies 42 (4):453-465.score: 12.0
    In this essay I describe seven central characteristics of Philip Quinn's approach to the epistemic challenge of religious diversity as they surface in his responses to other contemporary approaches. In the process an assessment is given of Quinn's contribution, and continued relevance, to the contemporary discussions about this topic. The first three sections describe Quinn's confrontations with Alvin Plantinga, William Alston, and John Hick. The next section presents critical comments on Quinn's unique notion of thinning.
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  37. Philip Clark, Mackie's Motivational Argument Philip Clark.score: 12.0
    Mackie doubted anything objective could have the motivational properties of a value. In thinking we are morally required to act in a certain way, he said, we attribute objective value to the action. Since nothing has objective value, these moral judgments are all false. As to whether Mackie proved his error theory, opinions vary. But there is broad agreement on one issue. A litany of examples, ranging from amoralism to depression to downright evil, has everyone convinced that Mackie vastly overstated (...)
     
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  38. Robert McKim (2012). Cooking with Philip Quinn. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (3):239-245.score: 12.0
    In response to various difficulties that confront John Hick’s pluralistic hypothesis, Philip Quinn proposes a recipe for developing more satisfactory pluralistic hypotheses. In this short exploratory paper I examine Quinn’s proposal, identify some problems that it faces, and consider some alternatives.
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  39. Philip Mirowski (1996). The Economic Consequences of Philip Kitcher. Social Epistemology 10 (2):153 – 169.score: 12.0
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  40. S. Olsaretti (2013). Coercion and Libertarianism: A Reply to Gordon Barnes. Analysis 73 (2):295-299.score: 12.0
    Libertarians oppose coercion and champion a free-market society. Are these two commitments, as libertarians claim, wholly consistent with one another, or is there, by contrast, a tension between them? This paper defends the latter view. Replying to an article by Gordon Barnes, the paper casts doubts on the success of an argument aimed at establishing that, while coercion is justice-disrupting, all non-coercive but forced transactions that occur in a free market are justice-preserving.
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  41. Jaana Eigi (2012). Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.score: 12.0
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields to protect the freedom of the underprivileged. -/- I explore Kitcher's argument in light of (...)
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  42. Timm Triplett (1986). Barnes on Heraclitus and the Unity of Opposites. Ancient Philosophy 6:15-23.score: 12.0
    Jonathan barnes argues that heraclitus's unity of opposites doctrine is logically contradictory in that it requires the coinstantiation of contrary properties. but barnes relies on rather strained interpretations of the doxography. heraclitus's unity of opposites doctrine is better understood as consisting of two aspects: (1) a claim that opposing qualities, rather than being coinstantiated in one thing, are related to one another via a process of cyclic transformation; and (2) an attempt to illustrate the limited and incomplete perspectives (...)
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  43. Karyn Lai (2012). Kam-Por Yu, Julia Tao, and Philip J. Ivanhoe (Eds.), Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):119-124.score: 12.0
    Kam-por Yu, Julia Tao, and Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-6 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9253-y Authors Karyn Lai, School of History of Philosophy, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  44. Bence Nanay (2013). From Philosophy of Science to Philosophy of Literature (and Back) Via Philosophy of Mind. Philip Kitcher’s Philosophical Pendulum. Theoria (77):257-264.score: 12.0
    A recent focus of Philip Kitcher’s research has been, somewhat surprisingly in the light of his earlier work, the philosophical analyses of literary works and operas. Some may see a discontinuity in Kitcher’s oeuvre in this respect – it may be difficult to see how his earlier contributions to philosophy of science relate to this much less mainstream approach to philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show that there is no such discontinuity: Kitcher’s contributions to the philosophy (...)
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  45. Edward O. Wilson, Stephen J. Pope & Philip Hefner (2001). E. O. Wilson, Stephen Pope, and Philip Hefner: A Conversation. Zygon 36 (2):249-253.score: 12.0
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  46. Ruth A. Mickelsen, Daniel S. Bernstein, Mary Faith Marshall & Steven H. Miles (2013). The Barnes Case: Taking Difficult Futility Cases Public. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):374-378.score: 12.0
    Futility disputes are increasing and courts are slowly abandoning their historical reluctance to engage these contentious issues, particularly when confronted with inappropriate surrogate demands for aggressive treatment. Use of the judicial system to resolve futility disputes inevitably brings media attention and requires clinicians, hospitals, and families to debate these deep moral conflicts in the public eye. A recent case in Minnesota, In re Emergency Guardianship of Albert Barnes, explores this emerging trend and the complex responsibilities of clinicians and hospital (...)
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  47. Inmaculada Perdomo (2012). The Characterization of Epistemology in Philip Kitcher: A Critical Reflection From New Empiricism. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 101 (1):113-138.score: 12.0
    While the earlier work of Philip Kitcher, in particular The Advancement of Science (1993), continues to inform his more recent studies, such as Science, Truth, and Democracy (2001), there are significant "changes of opinion" from those articulated in the 1990s. One may even speak of two different stages in the configuration of epistemological proposals. An analysis, from an empiricist standpoint, of the shifts between one and the other indicates further evolution towards realist positions but much more modest ones than (...)
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  48. Philip E. Devine (2013). Kitcher, Philip., The Ethical Project. Review of Metaphysics 66 (3):579-581.score: 12.0
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  49. Philip Mirowski (1992). More Bleat Than Bite Responses to Barnes, Cohen, Hands, and Wise. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 22 (1):131-141.score: 12.0
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  50. Michael Hector Storck (2008). Parts, Wholes, and Presence by Power A Response to Gordon P. Barnes. Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):45-59.score: 12.0
    Gordon P. Barnes has recently argued that presence by power is inadequate as an explanation of the way elements are present in complex bodies, and that it would be better to explain the elements’ presence by claiming that simpler substances—carbon atoms, for example—are actually and substantially present in living things. In order to address his arguments, this paper begins by briefly presenting St. Thomas’s understanding of presence by power, and then argues that Barnes’s proposal—that there is a multiplicity (...)
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