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  1. Joshua Colt Gambrel & Philip Cafaro (2010). The Virtue of Simplicity. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):85-108.
    In this paper we explore material simplicity, defined as the virtue disposing us to act appropriately within the sphere of our consumer decisions. Simplicity is a conscientious and restrained attitude toward material goods that typically includes (1) decreased consumption and (2) a more conscious consumption; hence (3) greater deliberation regarding our consumer decisions; (4) a more focused life in general; and (5) a greater and more nuanced appreciation for other things besides material goods, and also for (6) material goods themselves. (...)
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  2.  46
    Philip Cafaro (2001). Thoreau, Leopold, and Carson: Toward an Environmental Virtue Ethics. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):3-17.
    I argue for an environmental virtue ethics which specifies human excellence and flourishing in relation to nature. I consider Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson as environmental virtue ethicists, and show that these writers share certain ethical positions that any environmental virtue ethics worthy of the name must embrace. These positions include putting economic life in its proper,subordinate place within human life as a whole; cultivating scientific knowledge, while appreciating its limits; extending moral considerability to the nonhuman world; (...)
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  3.  52
    Ryan Pevnick, Philip Cafaro & Mathias Risse (2008). An Exchange: The Morality of Immigration. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (3):241-259.
    Writing in EIA 22, no. 1, Mathias Risse presented a novel way to think about the problem of immigration in the context of global justice, adopting the standpoint of the common ownership of the earth. The following Exchange is in response to that essay.
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  4.  35
    Winthrop Staples & Philip Cafaro (2009). The Environmental Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States. Environmental Ethics 31 (1).
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  5.  63
    Philip Cafaro & Ronald Sandler (eds.) (2005). Environmental Virtue Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The first on the topic of environmental virtue ethics, this book seeks to provide the definitive anthology that will both establish the importance of environmental virtue in environmental discourse and advance the current research on environmental virtue in interesting and original ways. The selections in this collection, consisting of ten original and four reprinted essays by leading scholars in the field, discuss the role that virtue and character have traditionally played in environmental discourse, and reflect upon the role that it (...)
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  6.  56
    Philip Cafaro (2010). Environmental Virtue Ethics Special Issue: Introduction. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):3-7.
  7.  22
    Philip J. Cafaro (2005). Gluttony, Arrogance, Greed, and Apathy: An Exploration of Environmental Vice. In R. Sandler & P. Cafaro (eds.), Environmental Virtue Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield 135--158.
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  8.  23
    Philip Cafaro (2001). Economic Consumption, Pleasure, and the Good Life. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):471–486.
  9.  38
    Philip Cafaro (2010). The Way Forward for Environmental Ethics. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (11-12):33-50.
    The overarching goal of environmentalism as a political movement is the creation of sustainable societies that share resources fairly among people, and among people and other species. The core objectives of environmental philosophy should include articulating the ideals and principles of such just and generous sustainability, arguing for them among academics and in the public sphere, and working out their implications in particular areas of our environmental decision-making. That means challenging the goodness of endless economic growth and helping other environmental (...)
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  10.  31
    Philip J. Cafaro, Richard B. Primack & Robert L. Zimdahl (2006). The Fat of the Land: Linking American Food Overconsumption, Obesity, and Biodiversity Loss. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):541-561.
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  11. Ryan Pevnick, Philip J. Cafaro, Mathias Risse, Christian Reus-Smit, Duncan Snidal, Olga Martin-Ortega, Alexandru Grigorescu, Paul D. Williams & Bounding Power (2008). Carnegie Council. Ethics and International Affairs 22.
     
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  12.  66
    Philip Cafaro (2010). Patriotism as an Environmental Virtue. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):185-206.
    Define “patriotism” as love for one’s country and devotion to its well-being. This essay contends that patriotism thus defined is a virtue and that environmentalism is one of its most important manifestations. Patriotism, as devotion to particular places and people, can occur at various levels, from the local to the national. Knowing and caring about particular places and people and working to protect them is good for us and good for them and hence a good thing overall. Knowing and caring (...)
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  13.  9
    Philip Cafaro (1995). Thoreauvian Patriotism as an Environmental Virtue. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 2 (2):1-7.
    In Walden Henry David Thoreau argues for and against patriotism. This paper argues that thoughtful environmentalists should do likewise. It explicates Thoreau’s accounts of “settling” and farming as efforts to rethink and deepen his connections to the land. These efforts define a patriotism that is local, thoughtful and moral. Thoreau’s economic philosophy can be seen as applied patriotism. Likeother virtues such as courage or prudence, patriotism is liable to a skewed development and various kinds of misuse. Yet properly developed it (...)
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  14.  6
    Philip Cafaro (2001). The Naturalist's Virtues. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):85-99.
    This paper argues that studying natural history helps make us more virtuous; that is, better and happier people. After sketching a broad conception of virtue, I discuss how naturalizing may improve our moral character and help develop our intellectual, aesthetic and physical abilities. I next assert essential connections between nonanthropocentrism and wisdom, and between natural history study and the achievement of a nonanthropocentric stance toward the world. Finally, I argue that the great naturalists suggest a noble, inspiring alternative to the (...)
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  15.  15
    Philip Cafaro (2006). Concerning Thoreau's Living Ethics. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):111-112.
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  16.  35
    Philip Cafaro (2011). Taming Growth and Articulating a Sustainable Future The Way Forward for Environmental Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 16 (1):1-24.
    The future of environmental ethics will be what environmental ethicists make of it. Since the field encompasses widely divergent philosophical orientations, talents, particular interests, and intuitions about the way forward, that future will be pluralistic. I believe this to be a good thing. But it is also helpful to step back from time to time, reflect on where we want to go, and ask whether we are leaving any essential tasks unaddressed.I take the overarching goal of environmentalism as a political (...)
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  17.  9
    Philip Cafaro (2002). Wild Fruits: Thoreau's Rediscovered Last Manuscript. Environmental Ethics 24 (1):97-98.
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  18.  26
    Matthew Gowans & Philip Cafaro (2003). A Latter-Day Saint Environmental Ethic. Environmental Ethics 25 (4):375-394.
    The doctrines and teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints support and even demand a strong environmental ethic. Such an ethic is grounded in the inherent value of all souls and in God’s commandment of stewardship. Latter-day Saint doctrine declares that all living organisms have souls and explicitly states that the ability of creatures to know some degree of satisfaction and happiness should be honored. God’s own concern for the well-being and progress of all life, and His (...)
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  19.  2
    Philip Cafaro (1998). Less is More. Philosophy Today 42 (1):26-39.
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  20.  38
    Philip Cafaro (2001). For a Grounded Conception of Wilderness and More Wilderness on the Ground. Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):1-17.
    : Recently a number of influential academic environmentalists have spoken out against wilderness, most prominently William Cronon and J. Baird Callicott. This is odd, given that these writers seem to support two cornerstone positions of environmentalism as it has developed over the past twenty years: first, the view articulated within environmental ethics that wild, nonhuman nature, or at least some parts of it, has intrinsic or inherent value; second, the understanding developed within conservation biology that we have entered a period (...)
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  21.  9
    Philip Cafaro & I. I. I. Staples (2009). The Environmental Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):5-30.
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  22.  18
    Philip Cafaro (2001). Dirty Virtues: Emergence of Ecological Virtue Ethics. Environmental Ethics 23 (2):211-214.
  23.  9
    Philip Cafaro (2001). Environmental Virtue Ethics: An Introduction. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (1):198.
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  24.  17
    Philip Cafaro (2004). Skeptical Environmentalism: The Limits of Philosophy and Science. Environmental Ethics 26 (1):101-104.
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  25.  13
    Philip Cafaro (2010). Conservation Refugees. Environmental Ethics 32 (3):335-336.
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  26.  14
    Philip Cafaro (2010). Getting to Less. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):11 – 14.
    Chrisoula Andreou's “No Avail Thesis” states that many environmentally-harmful conveniences and luxuries do not significantly contribute to human happiness, making the costs they incur largely a waste. The first half of this short paper affirms the ethical importance of this thesis, with special reference to global climate change. Growing evidence suggests that implementing efficiency measures will not be sufficient to allow humanity to avoid catastrophic climate change and that such measures will have to be supplemented by reductions in consumption itself. (...)
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  27.  5
    Philip Cafaro (1999). Personal Narratives and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 21 (1):109-110.
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  28.  3
    Philip Cafaro (2006). The Pine Island Paradox. Environmental Ethics 28 (4):435-438.
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  29.  11
    Philip Cafaro (2004). Fashionable Nihilism: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):257-260.
    Blurb: Thoreau wrote that we have professors of philosophy but no philosophers. Can't we have both? Why doesn't philosophy hold a more central place in our lives? Why should it? Eloquently opposing the analytic thrust of philosophy in academia, noted pluralist philosopher Bruce Wilshire answers these questions and more in an effort to make philosophy more meaningful to our everyday lives. Writing in an accessible style he resurrects classic yet neglected forms of inquiring and communicating. In a series of personal (...)
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  30.  2
    Philip Cafaro (2010). Economic Growth or the Flourishing of Life: The Ethical Choice Climate Change Puts to Humanity. Essays in Philosophy 11 (1):6.
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  31.  7
    Philip Cafaro (2008). Book Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):389-393.
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  32.  2
    Philip Cafaro (2008). Philip Cafaro Writes. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (3):248-254.
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  33. Philip Cafaro (1999). Carsten Bengt-Pedersen and Niels Thomassen, Eds., Nature and Lifeworld: Theoretical and Practical Metaphysics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (3):163-165.
     
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  34. Philip Cafaro (2015). Daniel Botkin: The Moon in the Nautilus Shell: Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered. Environmental Ethics 37 (2):239-240.
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  35.  18
    Philip Cafaro & Ronald L. Sandler (eds.) (2004). Environmental Virtue Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The first on the topic of environmental virtue ethics, this book seeks to provide the definitive anthology that will both establish the importance of environmental virtue in environmental discourse and advance the current research on environmental virtue in interesting and original ways. The selections in this collection, consisting of ten original and four reprinted essays by leading scholars in the field, discuss the role that virtue and character have traditionally played in environmental discourse, and reflect upon the role that it (...)
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  36. Philip Cafaro (2016). George Wuerthner, Eileen Crist and Tom Butler , Protecting the Wild: Parks and Wilderness, The Foundation for Conservation. Environmental Values 25 (6):759-761.
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  37. Philip Cafaro (2014). How Many is Too Many?: The Progressive Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States. University of Chicago Press.
    From the stony streets of Boston to the rail lines of California, from General Relativity to Google, one of the surest truths of our history is the fact that America has been built by immigrants. The phrase itself has become a steadfast campaign line, a motto of optimism and good will, and indeed it is the rallying cry for progressives today who fight against tightening our borders. This is all well and good, Philip Cafaro thinks, for the America of the (...)
     
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  38. Philip Cafaro (1999). Judith DeCew, In Pursuit of Privacy: Law, Ethics, and the Rise of Technology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (2):91-93.
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  39. Philip Cafaro (2000). Mark J. Smith, Ed., Thinking Through the Environment Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (4):291-292.
     
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  40.  23
    Cafaro Philip & Iii Winthrop Staples (2009). The Environmental Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):5-30.
    A serious commitment to environmentalism entails ending America’s population growth and hence a more restrictive immigration policy. The need to limit immigration necessarily follows when we combine a clear statement of our main environmental goals—living sustainably and sharing the landscape generously with nonhuman beings—with uncontroversial accounts of our current demographic trajectory and of the negative environmental effects of U.S. population growth, nationally and globally. Standard arguments for the immigration status quo or for an even more permissive immigration policy are without (...)
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