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Profile: Philip Cook (University of Edinburgh)
  1. Philip Ebert with Roy T. Cook, Critical Notice of Fine’s “Limits of Abstraction”.
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  2. Philip Cook (2013). Against a Minimum Voting Age. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (3):439-458.
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  3. Philip Cook & Conrad Heilmann (2013). Two Types of Self-Censorship: Public and Private. Political Studies 61 (1):178-196.
    We develop and defend a distinction between two types of self-censorship: public and private. First, we suggest that public self-censorship refers to a range of individual reactions to a public censorship regime. Second, private self-censorship is the suppression by an agent of his or her own attitudes where a public censor is either absent or irrelevant. The distinction is derived from a descriptive approach to self-censorship that asks: who is the censor, who is the censee, and how do they interact? (...)
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  4. Philip Cook & Jonathan Seglow (2013). The Margins of Citizenship: Introduction. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (3):321-325.
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  5. Philip Cook (2012). On the Duties of Shared Parenting. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):168-181.
    How should we understand the duties between those who share in parenting a child? Those who engage in shared parenting have duties to each other derived from the child's interests, but they also have additional duties to each other as sharers in parenting. The intentional account of duties between parents appears unable to explain the stringency of duties of shared parenting, as it seems to permit a parent to relinquish unilaterally their duties of shared parenting. Drawing on the work of (...)
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  6. Philip J. Cook (2011). Post-Heller Strategies to Reduce Gun Violence. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 8 (1):93-110.
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  7. Philip Cook (2008). An Augmented Buck-Passing Account of Reasons and Value: Scanlon and Crisp on What Stops the Buck. Utilitas 20 (4):490-507.
    Roger Crisp has inspired two important criticisms of Scanlon's buck-passing account of value. I defend buck-passing from the wrong kind of reasons criticism, and the reasons and the good objection. I support Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen's dual role of reasons in refuting the wrong kind of reasons criticism, even where its authors claim it fails. Crisp's reasons and the good objection contends that the property of goodness is buck-passing in virtue of its formality. I argue that Crisp conflates general and formal (...)
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  8. Philip Cook (2008). Moral Skepticisms. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (1):162-165.
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  9. Philip Cook & Conrad Heilmann, Censorship and Two Types of Self-Censorship.
    We propose and defend a distinction between two types of self-censorship: public and private. In public self-censorship, individuals restrain their expressive attitudes in response to public censors. In private self-censorship, individuals do so in the absence of public censorship. We argue for this distinction by introducing a general model which allows us to identify, describe, and compare a wide range of censorship regimes. The model explicates the interaction between censors and censees and yields the distinction between two types of self-censorship. (...)
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