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Philip E. Devine [56]Philip E. Pe Devine [1]
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Profile: Philip Edwards Devine (Providence College)
  1.  6
    Philip E. Devine, Politics After MacIntyre.
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  2. Philip E. Devine (forthcoming). The Species Principle and the Potential Principle. Bioethics: Readings and Cases. New Jersey, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall Inc.
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  3. Michael Tooley, Alison M. Jaggar, Philip E. Devine & Celia Wolf-Devine (2009). Abortion: Three Perspectives. OUP Usa.
    The newest addition to the Point/Counterpoint Series, Abortion: Three Perspectives features a debate between four noted philosophers - Michael Tooley, Celia Wolf-Devine, Philip E. Devine, and Alison M. Jaggar - presenting different perspectives on one of the most socially and politically argued issues of the past 30 years. The three main arguments include the "liberal" pro-choice approach, the "communitarian" pro-life approach, and the "gender justice" approach. Divided into two parts, the text features the authors' ideas, developed in depth, and their (...)
     
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  4.  95
    Philip E. Devine (1984). Abortion and Infanticide By Michael Tooley Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983, 441 Pp., £20.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 59 (230):545-.
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  5.  15
    Philip E. Devine (1996). Creation and Evolution: PHILIP E. DEVINE. Religious Studies 32 (3):325-337.
    Despite the bad reputation of the legal profession, law remains king in America. A highly diverse society relies on the laws to maintain a working sense of the dignity and inviability of each individual. And a persistent element in contemporary debates is the fear that naturalistic theories of the human person will erode our belief that we have a dignity greater than that of other natural objects. Thus the endurance of the creation vs. evolution debate is due less to the (...)
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  6.  78
    Philip E. Devine (1983). Abortion, Contraception, Infanticide. Philosophy 58 (226):513 - 520.
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  7.  47
    Philip E. Devine (1978). The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism. Philosophy 53 (206):481 - 505.
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  8.  82
    Philip E. Devine (2000). Capital Punishment and the Sanctity of Life. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):229–243.
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  9.  47
    Philip E. Devine (2009). What's Wrong with Torture? International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (3):317-332.
    Many of us want to say that there is an absolute—or at least a virtually absolute—prohibition on torturing people. But we live in a world in which firm moral restraints of all sorts are hard to defend. Neither contemporary conventional morality, nor any of the available moral theories, provides adequate support for the deliverances of the “wisdom of repugnance” in this area. Nor do they support casuistry capable of distinguishing torture from (sometimes legitimate) forms of rough treatment. I here make (...)
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  10. Philip E. Devine (1999). Natural Law Ethics. Greenwood Press.
     
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  11.  10
    Philip E. Devine (1985). Birth, Copulation, and Death. New Scholasticism 59 (3):276-295.
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  12.  52
    Philip E. Devine (1987). Relativism, Abortion, and Tolerance. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (1):131-138.
  13.  5
    Philip E. Devine (1978). The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism: Philip E. Devine. Philosophy 53 (206):481-505.
    If someone abstains from meat-eating for reasons of taste or personal economics, no moral or philosophical question arises. But when a vegetarian attempts to persuade others that they, too, should adopt his diet, then what he says requires philosophical attention. While a vegetarian might argue in any number of ways, this essay will be concerned only with the argument for a vegetarian diet resting on a moral objection to the rearing and killing of animals for the human table. The vegetarian, (...)
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  14.  2
    Philip E. Devine & John Ladd (1981). The Ethics of Homicide. Philosophical Review 90 (4):633-637.
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  15.  26
    Philip E. Devine (1984). Relativism. The Monist 67 (3):405-418.
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  16.  16
    Philip E. Devine (2013). Kitcher, Philip., The Ethical Project. Review of Metaphysics 66 (3):579-581.
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  17.  11
    Philip E. Devine (1977). "Exists" and St. Anselm's Argument. Grazer Philosophische Studien 3:59-70.
    This paper examines interpretations of the doctrine that "exists" is not a predicate (existence is not a property). None, it is concluded, is both true and a refutation of St. Anselm's "ontological" argument for the existence of God.
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  18.  16
    Philip E. Devine (2011). Against Superkitten Ethics. International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (4):429-436.
    I here criticize the use of science-fiction examples in ethics, chiefly, though not solely, by defenders of abortion. We have no reliable intuitions concerning such examples—certainly nothing strong enough to set against the strong intuition that infanticide is virtually always wrong.
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  19.  25
    William F. Vallicella, Keith Burgess-Jackson, Philip E. Devine, John Pepple & Michael Kelly (2003). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 77 (2):85 - 87.
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  20.  19
    Philip E. Devine (1998). On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Ethics and Politics. Review of Metaphysics 51 (3):717-718.
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  21.  34
    Philip E. Devine (1979). The Conscious Acceptance of Guilt in the Necessary Murder. Ethics 89 (3):221-239.
  22.  17
    Philip E. Devine (1990). What's the Meaning of "This"? Review of Metaphysics 44 (1):131-132.
  23.  20
    Philip E. Devine (1996). Creation and Evolution. Religious Studies 32 (3):325 - 337.
    I defend the coherence of Theistic Evolutionism, though I do not present any direct argument for either theism or (broadly Darwinian) evolution. I distinguish between evolution as a scientific theory, however well established, and evolutionism as a religion or ideology. I argue that the confusion between the two senses of evolutionism is bad for both biology and religion, and conclude by suggesting that, in Irving Kristol's words, 'our goal should be to have biology and evolution taught in a way that (...)
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  24.  16
    Sandra Lee Bartky, Marilyn Friedman, William Harper, Alison M. Jaggar, Richard H. Miller, Abigail L. Rosenthal, Naomi Scheman, Nancy Tuana, Steven Yates, Christina Sommers, Philip E. Devine, Harry Deutsch, Michael Kelly & Charles L. Reid (1992). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (7):55 - 90.
  25. Philip E. Devine (1989). Relativism, Nihilism, and God.
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  26.  12
    Philip E. Devine (1975). The Perfect Island, the Devil, and Existent Unicorns. American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):255 - 260.
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  27.  8
    Philip E. Devine (1975). Does St. Anselm Beg the Question? Philosophy 50 (193):271 - 281.
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  28.  13
    Philip E. Devine, The Search for Moral Absolutes.
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  29.  10
    Philip E. Devine (1987). Acting and Refraining/Intention and Foresight. Dialogue 26 (1):87.
    It is commonplace that negative duties are more stringent than positive duties. it is also commonplace that this distinction requires defense, in particular against those who regard it as a mere apology for the privileges of the wealthy and secure. i conclude, though real, the distinction between negative and positive duties is not as deep as some philosophers have supposed--that it makes best sense in terms of a deeper distinction between the intended and the foreseen consequences of our actions.
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  30.  3
    Philip E. Devine (1993). The Ethics of Deconstruction: Derrida and Levinas. Philosophical Books 34 (3):174-175.
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  31.  1
    Philip E. Devine (1975). Current Periodical Articles 161. American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3).
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  32.  7
    Philip E. Devine (1990). The Evidential Force of Religious Experience. Review of Metaphysics 44 (2):419-420.
  33.  3
    Philip E. Devine (1995). A Fallacious Argument Against Moral Absolutes. Argumentation 9 (4):611-616.
    The denial of moral absolutes rests, I think, on a seductive but fallacious argument, which I shall attempt both to expound and to refute here. Human beings are highly complex creatures living in a highly complex world. Every human being is different from every other, every interaction or relationship between or among human beings is unique. Hence also every occasion for moral choice is also unique, and all those action kinds - be theyadultery, murder, rape, theft, ortorture on which moralists (...)
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  34.  11
    Philip E. Devine (1974). The Logic of Fiction. Philosophical Studies 26 (5-6):389 - 399.
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  35.  6
    Philip E. Devine (1987). Comparable Worth. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (3):11-19.
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  36.  3
    Philip E. Devine (1980). Abortion & the 'Middle' View. Hastings Center Report 10 (3):4-4.
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  37.  6
    Philip E. Devine (1991). Ideologues or Scholars? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):69-78.
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  38.  5
    Philip E. Devine (1975). The Religious Significance of the Ontological Argument. Religious Studies 11 (1):97 - 116.
    I discuss the religious implications of accepting the ontological argument as sound. in particular, i attempt to show in detail how the argument fails to validate religious belief.
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  39.  1
    Philip E. Devine (1975). The Religious Significance of the Ontological Argument: PHILIP E.DEVINE. Religious Studies 11 (1):97-116.
    It seems clear that the ontological argument can no longer be dismissed as a silly fallacy. The dogma of the impossibility of necessary existence is seriously threatened by the case of necessary existential truths in mathematics, and as for the claim that the ontological argument must beg the question, since by mentioning God in the premise his existence is presupposed, it is undermined by the fact that we often refer to things—Hamlet for instance— we do not for a moment think (...)
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  40.  2
    Philip E. Devine (1996). Intrinsic Value: Concept and Warrant. Philosophical Books 37 (3):202-204.
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  41.  3
    Philip E. Devine & Reuben Abel (1990). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 64 (1):27 - 28.
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  42.  3
    Philip E. Devine (1980). Homicide Revisited. Philosophy 55 (213):329 - 347.
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  43.  1
    Philip E. Devine (1991). Aids and the L-Word. Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (2):137-147.
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  44.  1
    Philip E. Pe Devine (1974). The Principle of Double Effect. American Journal of Jurisprudence 19 (1):44.
  45.  1
    Philip E. Devine (2004). Ethics. Philosophical Books 45 (3):257-267.
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  46. Philip E. Devine (1996). Academic Freedom in the Postmodern World. Public Affairs Quarterly 10 (3):185-201.
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  47. Philip E. Devine (1984). A Gross Abuse of Judicial Power? Hastings Center Report 14 (1):47-47.
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  48. Philip E. Devine (1975). Does St Anselm Beg the Question?: Philip E. Devine. Philosophy 50 (193):271-281.
    The following objection to the ‘ontological’ argument of St Anselm has a continuing importance. The argument begs the question by introducing into the first premise the name ‘God’. In order for something to be truly talked about, to have properties truly attributed to it—it has been said—it must exist; a statement containing a vacuous name must either be false, meaningless, or lacking in truth-value, if it is not a misleading formulation to be explained by paraphrase into other terms. In any (...)
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  49. Philip E. Devine (1996). Human Diversity and the Culture Wars: A Philosophical Perspective on Contemporary Cultural Conflict. Praeger.
     
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  50. Philip E. Devine (1980). Homicide Revisited: Philip E. Devine. Philosophy 55 (213):329-347.
    Jonathan Glover and I, while not in such deep disagreement about the ethics of killing as to make all communication impossible, still disagree enough to make sustained confrontation worthwhile. At minimum, such confrontation should make it clear what are the most fundamental issues at stake in ethical arguments about various kinds of killing.
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