Search results for 'Philip Gilbert Fothergill' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Philip Gilbert Fothergill (1962). Historical Aspects of Organic Evolution. London, Hollis and Carter.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  4
    Solomon H. Katz, William Lesher, Karl E. Peters, Don Browning, Paul H. Carr, Marjorie H. Davis, Thomas L. Gilbert, P. Roger Gillette, Melvin Gray & Lothar Schäfer (2009). Patrons—Philip Hefner Fund. Zygon 44 (1):653-654.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    Frederick F. Schmitt, Gary Ebbs, Margaret Gilbert, Sally Haslanger, Kevin Kimble, Ron Mallon, Seumas Miller, Philip Pettit, Abraham Sesshu Roth, John Searle, Raimo Tuomela & Edward Witherspoon (2003). Socializing Metaphysics: The Nature of Social Reality. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Socializing Metaphysics supplies diverse answers to the basic questions of social metaphysics, from a broad array of voices. It will interest all philosophers and social scientists concerned with mind, action, or the foundations of social theory.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  80
    Margaret P. Gilbert, Gilbert Harman and Judith Jarvis Thomson's Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  79
    Margaret Gilbert (1999). Critical Notice: Gilbert Harman and Judith Jarvis Thomson, Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity. Noûs 33 (2):295–303.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Stephen Burwood, Paul Gilbert & Kathleen Lennon (1999). Philosophy of Mind Stephen Burwood, Paul Gilbert and Kathleen Lennon.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Gary W. Gilbert (2009). But, Socrates-Gary W. Gilbert Doesn't Seem to Know the Form. Philosophy Now 74:33.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. M. Gilbert (1999). Critical Notice: Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity, Gilbert Harman and Judith Jarvis Thomson, 1996, Blackwell Publishers. Noûs 33 (2):295-303.
  9.  1
    Lawrence Haworth (1955). Book Review:Historical Aspects of Organic Evolution Philip G. Fothergill. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 22 (3):237-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. John Greene (1963). Evolution and Christians by Philip G. Fothergill. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 54:148-150.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Michael Stock (1962). Philip G. Fothergill, F.R.S.E., "Evolution and Christians". [REVIEW] The Thomist 25 (1):165.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  50
    Frank Hindriks, Sara Rachel Chant & Gerhard Preyer (2014). Beyond the Big Four and the Big Five. In Sara Rachel Chant, Frank Hindriks & Gerhard Preyer (eds.), From Individual to Collective Intentionality. 1-9.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  7
    Philip Knee (1990). HOTTOIS, Gilbert, Éd., Lumières Et Romantisme. Annales de l'Institut de Philosophie de l'Université de Bruxelles HOTTOIS, Gilbert, Éd., Lumières Et Romantisme. Annales de l'Institut de Philosophie de l'Université de Bruxelles. [REVIEW] Laval Théologique et Philosophique 46 (3):422-423.
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  46
    Thomas H. Smith (2015). 'Shared Agency', Gilbert, and Deep Continuity. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (1).
    I compare Bratman’s theory with Gilbert’s. I draw attention to their similarities, query Bratman’s claim that his theory is the more parsimonious, and point to one theoretical advantage of Gilbert’s theory.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Sara Rachel Chant, Frank Hindriks & Gerhard Preyer (eds.) (2014). From Individual to Collective Intentionality: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Includes essays that challenge the need for a theory of collective intentionality as well as essays that extend and enrich existing theories of collective intentionality The essays concerning collective rationality (part II) break new ground in that they challenge the idea that there is a straightforward dichotomy between individual and collective level rationality Many of the things we do, we do together with other people. Think of carpooling and playing tennis. In the past two or three decades it has become (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  3
    Neil Pickering (2014). A Random Blend: The Self in Philip Larkin's Poems “Ambulances” and “The Building”. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):163-170.
    In two of his great poems, “Ambulances” and “The Building,” Philip Larkin considers a deep fear about human individuality. The fear is that the human self is contingent and disjunctive, lacking any integrity or unity. The arrival of an ambulance on an urban curb and a visit to the hospital are the occasion of reflection on this form of human fragility. But more significant, the ambulance and the hospital are imagined as contexts in which the contingency of the human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  83
    Various Authors, 60 Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Professor Wlodek Rabinowicz.
    Contributing Authors: Lilli Alanen & Frans Svensson, David Alm, Gustaf Arrhenius, Gunnar Björnsson, Luc Bovens, Richard Bradley, Geoffrey Brennan & Nicholas Southwood, John Broome, Linus Broström & Mats Johansson, Johan Brännmark, Krister Bykvist, John Cantwell, Erik Carlson, David Copp, Roger Crisp, Sven Danielsson, Dan Egonsson, Fred Feldman, Roger Fjellström, Marc Fleurbaey, Margaret Gilbert, Olav Gjelsvik, Kathrin Glüer & Peter Pagin, Ebba Gullberg & Sten Lindström, Peter Gärdenfors, Sven Ove Hansson, Jana Holsanova, Nils Holtug, Victoria Höög, Magnus Jiborn, Karsten Klint (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  13
    Eduardo Salles O. Barra (2010). Valores epistêmicos no naturalismo normativos de Philip Kitcher. Principia 4 (1):1-26.
    This paper aims at analyzing Philip Kitcher's naturalistic epistemology, particularly its normative features, which are viewed as a sort of response to negative assessments made by radical naturalists on the plurality of epistemic values. According to them such values are ineffective for normative ends, e.g. theory choice. Differently from that quite excessive evaluation, Kitcher argues rather for explanatory unity as the most important and universal epistemic value. Even though Kitcher's arguments are sound, there remains some serious gaps as regards (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Walter Leszl (1970). Philip Merlan e la metafisica aristotelica. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 25 (1):3.
    The paper offers a discussion of Philip Merlan's contributions (in "From Platonism to Neoplatonism, The Hague 1960, e in some papers of his, now included in his "Kleine Philosophische Schriften", Hildesheim 1976) to the understanding of Aristotle's metaphysics, with particular reference to the science of being qua being.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  1
    Gregory E. Pence, George Annas, Stephen Jay Gould, George Johnson, Axel Kahn, Leon Kass, Philip Kitcher, R. C. Lewontin, Gilbert Meilaender, Timothy F. Murphy, National Bioethics Advisory Commission, Chief Justice John Roberts & James D. Watson (1998). Flesh of My Flesh: The Ethics of Cloning Humans a Reader. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Flesh of My Flesh is a collection of articles by today's most respected scientists, philosophers, bioethicists, theologians, and law professors about whether we should allow human cloning. It includes historical pieces to provide background for the current debate. Religious, philosophical, and legal points of view are all represented.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Philip Pettit & Xavier Vanmechelen (2002). Afhankelijkheid Zonder Dominantie Over de Sociale En Politieke Filosofie van Philip Pettit. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Sara Rachel Chant, Frank Hindriks & Gerhard Preyer (eds.) (2014). From Individual to Collective Intentionality: New Essays. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Many of the things we do, we do together with other people. Think of carpooling and playing tennis. In the past two or three decades it has become increasingly popular to analyze such collective actions in terms of collective intentions. This volume brings together ten new philosophical essays that address issues such as how individuals succeed in maintaining coordination throughout the performance of a collective action, whether groups can actually believe propositions or whether they merely accept them, and what kind (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Peter W. Robinson & Gilbert Ryle (1960). Gilbert Ryle's Concept of Mind Compared with Scholastic Psychology. [Jesuit Faculties of Philosophy and Theology ?].
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. James W. Haag (2006). Between Physicalism and Mentalism: Philip Clayton on Mind and Emergence. Zygon 41 (3):633-647.
  25.  11
    Jean-Hugues Barthélémy & Andrew Iliadis (2015). Gilbert Simondon and the Philosophy of Information: An Interview with Jean-Hugues Barthélémy. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (1):102-112.
  26.  29
    Antje Jackelen (2006). Emergence Everywhere?! Reflections on Philip Clayton's Mind and Emergence. Zygon 41 (3):623-632.
  27.  8
    Hanna Karolina Kubicka (2015). Nora Gilbert Better Left Unsaid: Victorian Novels, Hays Code Films, and the Benefits of Censorship. Film-Philosophy 19.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  5
    Katherine Blakeney (2015). Eve Golden John Gilbert: The Last of the Silent Film Stars. Film-Philosophy 19.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  8
    Jerome A. Stone (2004). Philip Hefner and the Modernist/Postmodernist Divide. Zygon 39 (4):755-772.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  14
    Philip Rolnick (2002). Regarding Philip Clayton. Tradition and Discovery 29 (3):5-6.
    This brief opening for a special issue of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical on Philip Clayton’s thought and its connection with that of Michael Polany introduces Clayton’s essay and the responses by Martinez Hewlett, Gregory R. Peterson, Andy F. Sanders and Waler B. Gulick.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  31
    Willem B. Drees (1999). God and Contemporary Science: Philip Clayton's Defense of Panentheism. Zygon 34 (3):515-525.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Virgil C. Aldrich & Konstantin Kolenda (eds.) (1972). Studies in Philosophy: A Symposium on Gilbert Ryle. Houston, Tex.,William Marsh Rice University.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Philip L. Quinn & Paul J. Weithman (eds.) (2008). Liberal Faith: Essays in Honor of Philip Quinn. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Philip Quinn, John A. O’Brien Professor at the University of Notre Dame from 1985 until his death in 2004, was well known for his work in the philosophy of religion, political philosophy, and core areas of analytic philosophy. Although the breadth of his interests was so great that it would be virtually impossible to identify any subset of them as representative, the contributors to this volume provide an excellent introduction to, and advance the discussion of, some of the questions (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Jonathan Westphal (1988). Reply to Gilbert's Westphal and Wittgenstein on White. Mind 97 (October):603-604.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Helen E. Longino (2002). Science and the Common Good: Thoughts on Philip Kitcher's Science, Truth, and Democracy. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):560-568.
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher develops the notion of well-ordered science: scientific inquiry whose research agenda and applications are subject to public control guided by democratic deliberation. Kitcher's primary departure from his earlier views involves rejecting the idea that there is any single standard of scientific significance. The context-dependence of scientific significance opens up many normative issues to philosophical investigation and to resolution through democratic processes. Although some readers will feel Kitcher has not moved far enough from (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  36.  13
    Donald A. Landes (2014). Individuals and Technology: Gilbert Simondon, From Ontology to Ethics to Feminist Bioethics. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):153-176.
    Two key themes structure the work of French philosopher of science Gilbert Simondon: the processes of individuation and the nature of technical objects. Moreover, these two themes are also at the heart of contemporary debates within Ethics and Bioethics. Indeed, the question of the individual is a key concern in both Virtue Ethics and Feminist Ethics of Care, while the hyper-technical reality of the present stage of medical technology is a key reason for both the urgency for and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  45
    Paul E. Griffiths (2006). The Fearless Vampire Conservator: Philip Kitcher, Genetic Determinism and the Informational Gene. In Christoph Rehmann-Sutter & Eva M. Neumann-Held (eds.), Genes in Development: Rethinking the Molecular Paradigm. Duke University Press 175--198.
    Genetic determinism is the idea that many significant human characteristics are rendered inevitable by the presence of certain genes. The psychologist Susan Oyama has famously compared arguing against genetic determinism to battling the undead. Oyama suggests that genetic determinism is inherent in the way we currently represent genes and what genes do. As long as genes are represented as containing information about how the organism will develop, they will continue to be regarded as determining causes no matter how much evidence (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  38. Daniel Attala Pochon (1997). Dos escepticismos y desafío escéptico en The Advancement of Science, de Philip Kitcher (Two Skepticism and Skeptic Challenge in Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science). Theoria 12 (2):317-335.
    En este artículo me propongo analizar el punto de partida epistemológico de un reciente libro de Philip Kitcher (The Advancement of Science) a través de su discusión con las concepciónes ‘escépticas’. Podemos distinguir entre dos tipos de escepticismo en Ia trama deI libro de Kitcher: uno débil y otro radical. Intentamos difinir el tipo de realismo que Kitcher defiende, para finalmente mostrar que tal tipo de realismo es posible para Kitcher en Ia medida que no toma en cuenta el (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Kenneth Olson & Gilbert Plumer (2003). Reasoning in Listening. In Frans H. van Eemeren, J. Anthony Blair, Charles A. Willard & A. Francisca Snoeck Henkemans (eds.), Proceedings of the Fifth Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation. Sic Sat 803-806.
    Our thesis is that reasoning plays a greater—or at least a different—role in understanding oral discourse such as lectures and speeches than it does in understanding comparatively long written discourse. For example, both reading and listening involve framing hypotheses about the direction the discourse is headed. But since a reader can skip around to check and revise hypotheses, the reader’s stake in initially getting it right is not as great as the listener’s, who runs the risk of getting hopelessly lost. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  53
    Todd Giles (2013). No Permanent Home": The Five Skandhas and Philip Whalen's "The Slop Barrel. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):405-420.
    “Skhandas my ass! Even that” Alan Watts, in his oft-quoted 1958 Chicago Review essay “Beat Zen, Square Zen, and Zen,”3 fails to mention Philip Whalen—whose “Sourdough Mountain Lookout” appeared in truncated form in the same issue—even though he takes Gary Snyder, Jack Kerouac, and Allen Ginsberg to task. In fact, toward the beginning of his essay, Watts even makes a statement about Confucianism and Taoism that sounds similar to the dynamics one finds at play in Whalen’s poetry. The ancient (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Philip Kitcher, Philip Kitcher.
    Philosophy is often conceived in the Anglophone world today as a subject that focuses on questions in particular ‘‘core areas,’’ pre-eminently epistemology and metaphysics. This article argues that the contemporary conception is a new version of the scholastic ‘‘self-indulgence for the few’’ of which Dewey complained nearly a century ago. Philosophical questions evolve, and a first task for philosophers is to address issues that arise for their own times. The article suggests that a renewal of philosophy today should turn the (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  64
    Michael J. McNeal (2013). Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence by Philip J. Kain (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):123-125.
    In Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence, Philip J. Kain makes a compelling case for taking Nietzsche’s concern with the subject of horror seriously and then challenges his conclusions about it. A corollary of existence, horror is an ineliminable part of being human. Our experience of horror prompts reflection on life and the act of philosophizing. Arguing it is a formative yet often overlooked theme in Nietzsche’s oeuvre, Kain recognizes that the experience of horror is central to “Nietzsche’s vision” (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  51
    Jaana Eigi (2012). Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields to protect the (...) of the underprivileged. -/- I explore Kitcher's argument in light of the interpretation Helen Longino gave to Mill's argument. She argued that free critical dialogue in the community allows bias to be overcome, through intersubjective criticism of hypotheses and the background assumptions that frame them. I suggest that Longino's approach allows for the identification of the fundamental problems of the research programs Kitcher targeted, and for the rejection of their claims to knowledge. Thus it is possible to address Kitcher's problem without limiting freedom of speech. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  12
    Philip E. Devine (1996). Creation and Evolution: PHILIP E. DEVINE. Religious Studies 32 (3):325-337.
    Despite the bad reputation of the legal profession, law remains king in America. A highly diverse society relies on the laws to maintain a working sense of the dignity and inviability of each individual. And a persistent element in contemporary debates is the fear that naturalistic theories of the human person will erode our belief that we have a dignity greater than that of other natural objects. Thus the endurance of the creation vs. evolution debate is due less to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  55
    Bence Nanay (2013). From Philosophy of Science to Philosophy of Literature (and Back) Via Philosophy of Mind. Philip Kitcher’s Philosophical Pendulum. Theoria (77):257-264.
    A recent focus of Philip Kitcher’s research has been, somewhat surprisingly in the light of his earlier work, the philosophical analyses of literary works and operas. Some may see a discontinuity in Kitcher’s oeuvre in this respect – it may be difficult to see how his earlier contributions to philosophy of science relate to this much less mainstream approach to philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show that there is no such discontinuity: Kitcher’s contributions to the philosophy (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  30
    Jesús Zamora Bonilla (2000). El naturalismo científico de Ronald Giere y Philip Kitcher. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 24 (1):169.
    Se discute el proyecto de la naturalización de la filosofía de la ciencia, a través de las teorías de Ronald Giere y Philip Kitcher. Ambas tienen en común la atención preferente que prestan a los procesos de decisión de los científicos individuales y la defensa de una concepción realista y racionalista de la ciencia. La comparación se lleva a cabo desde una triple perspectiva: su consideración como teorías darwinianas del desarrollo científico, su referencia a los modelos de la psicología (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  18
    Philip Mirowski (1996). The Economic Consequences of Philip Kitcher. Social Epistemology 10 (2):153 – 169.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  19
    James Kraft (2006). Philip Quinn's Contribution to the Epistemic Challenge of Religious Diversity. Religious Studies 42 (4):453-465.
    In this essay I describe seven central characteristics of Philip Quinn's approach to the epistemic challenge of religious diversity as they surface in his responses to other contemporary approaches. In the process an assessment is given of Quinn's contribution, and continued relevance, to the contemporary discussions about this topic. The first three sections describe Quinn's confrontations with Alvin Plantinga, William Alston, and John Hick. The next section presents critical comments on Quinn's unique notion of thinning.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  22
    M. Solomon (1995). Legend Naturalism and Scientific Progress: An Essay on Philip Kitcher's the Advancement of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):205-218.
    Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science sets out, programmatically, a new naturalistic view of science as a process of building consensus practices. Detailed historical case studies--centrally, the Darwinian revolution--are intended to support this view. I argue that Kitcher's expositions in fact support a more conservative view, that I dub 'Legend Naturalism'. Using four historical examples which increasingly challenge Kitcher's discussions, I show that neither Legend Naturalism, nor the less conservative programmatic view, gives an adequate account of scientific progress. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50.  15
    Judith Green (2014). Introduction: A Collaborative Critical Conversation on Philip Kitcher's Preludes to Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):1-8,.
    On April 26, 2013, Philip Kitcher met with a line-up of six critics at the New York Pragmatist Forum to learn what they thought about his latest large book, Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward a Reconstruction in Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2012). The following contributions, as well as Kitcher’s reply, originated in this meeting, with each author taking into account Kitcher’s initial responses while further developing his or her arguments.As S. Joshua Thomas notes below, our purpose as critics has been (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000