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Philip J. Kain [53]Philip Joseph Kain [1]
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Profile: Philip J. Kain (Santa Clara University)
  1.  9
    Philip J. Kain (2015). Ben Lazare Mijuskovic, Feeling Lonesome: The Philosophy and Psychology of Loneliness. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (5):276-277.
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  2.  96
    Philip J. Kain (2007). Nietzsche, Eternal Recurrence, and the Horror of Existence. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (1):49-63.
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  3.  5
    Philip J. Kain (2015). Hegel, Recognition, and Same‐Sex Marriage. Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (2):226-241.
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  4.  21
    Philip J. Kain (1988). Marx and Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book traces the development of Marx's ethics as they underwent various shifts and changes during different periods of his thought. In his early writings, his ethics were based on a concept of essence much like Aristotle's, which Marx tried to link to a principle of universalization similar to Kant's "categorical imperative." In the period 1845-46, Marx abandoned this view, holding morality to be incompatible with his historical materialism. In the later work he was less of a determinist. Though he (...)
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  5.  4
    Philip J. Kain (2014). Hegel and the Failure of Civil Society. The Owl of Minerva 46 (1):43-65.
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  6.  71
    Philip J. Kain (2009). Nietzsche, Virtue and the Horror of Existence. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):153 – 167.
    The article focuses on philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche's commitment to a virtue ethic and his belief in the horror of existence. It talks about the Nietzsche view on the need to construct a meaning for suffering in order to obscure the meaninglessness of existence. The philosophical implications that follow from the horror of existence and the need for virtue to be compatible with happiness are discussed. The article also explores the need for power to create and maintain illusions related to virtue (...)
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  7.  42
    Philip J. Kain (1990). Rousseau, the General Will, and Individual Liberty. History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3):315 - 334.
  8.  16
    Philip J. Kain (2004). Nietzsche, the Kantian Self, and Eternal Recurrence. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):225-238.
    Nietzsche’s concept of the self grows out of Kant—and then attempts to subvert Kant. Nietzsche agrees that a unified subject is a necessary presupposition for ordered experience to be possible. But instead of a Kantian unified self, Nietzsche develops a conception of the self of the sort that we have come to call postmodern. He posits a composite bundle of drives that become unified only through organization. This subject is unified, it is just that its unity is forged, constructed, brought (...)
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  9.  12
    Philip J. Kain (1979-80). Alienation and Estrangement in the Thought of Hegel and the Young Marx. Philosophical Forum 11 (2):136-60.
    FOR HEGEL, ALIENATION ("ENTAUSSERUNG") IS NOT TO BE IDENTIFIED WITH ESTRANGEMENT ("ENTFREMDUNG"). ALIENATION CAN LEAD TO ESTRANGEMENT; IT CAN WORK TO OVERCOME ESTRANGEMENT; OR IT CAN SIMPLY BE POSITIVE AND DESIRABLE ON ITS OWN. WHILE ESTRANGEMENT IS NECESSARY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF CULTURE, ULTIMATELY IT IS NEGATIVE AND IS TO BE OVERCOME; ONLY POSITIVE ALIENATION WILL THEN REMAIN. FOR THE YOUNG MARX, ALIENATION NEVER OVERCOMES ESTRANGEMENT, AND ALIENATION IS NEVER POSITIVE. ALIENATION ALWAYS LEADS TO ESTRANGEMENT AND BOTH ARE TO BE (...)
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  10.  12
    Philip J. Kain (1983). Nietzsche, Skepticism, and Eternal Recurrence. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):365 - 387.
  11.  10
    Philip J. Kain (1997). Hegel, Reason, and Idealism. Idealistic Studies 27 (1/2):97-112.
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  12.  34
    Philip J. Kain (2007). Eternal Recurrence and the Categorical Imperative. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):105-116.
    The question has been raised whether Nietzsche intends eternal recurrence to be like a categorical imperative. The obvious objection to understanding eternal recurrence as like a categorical imperative isthat for a categorical imperative to make any sense, for moral obligation to make any sense, it must be possible for individuals to change themselves. And Nietzsche denies that individuals can changethemselves. Magnus thinks the determinism “implicit in the doctine of the eternal recurrence of the same renders any imperative impotent.… How can (...)
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  13.  27
    Philip J. Kain (1996). Nietzschean Genealogy and Hegelian History in "The Genealogy of Morals". Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):123-147.
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  14.  12
    Philip J. Kain (1993). Marx, Housework, and Alienation. Hypatia 8 (1):121 - 144.
    For different feminist theorists, housework and child rearing are viewed in very different ways. I argue that Marx gives us the categories that allow us to see why housework and child care can be both a paradigm of unalienated labor and also involve the greatest oppression. In developing this argument, a distinction is made between alienation and oppression and the conditions are discussed under which unalienated housework can become oppressive or can become alienated.
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  15.  20
    Philip J. Kain (2006). Nietzsche, Truth, and the Horror of Existence. History of Philosophy Quarterly 23 (1):41 - 58.
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  16.  6
    Philip J. Kain (1993). Marx and Modern Political Theory: From Hobbes to Contemporary Feminism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Hegel,. the. State,. and. Spirit. Hegel's political thought can best be understood if we understand its relationship to Rousseau's political theory and Kant's philosophy of history. In the first place, Hegel's conception of the modern state closely ...
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  17.  27
    Philip J. Kain (1998). Self-Consciousness, the Other and Hegel's Dialectic of Recognition: Alternative to a Postmodern Subterfuge. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (5):105-126.
    This article examines Hegel's treatment of self-consciousness in light of the contemporary problem of the other. It argues that Hegel tries to subvert the Kantian opposition between theoretical and practical reason and tries to establish a form of idealism that can avoid solipsism. All of this requires that Hegel get beyond the Kantian concept of the object - or the other. Hegel attempts to establish an other that is not marginalized, dominated, or negated. What he gives us is a valuable (...)
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  18.  13
    Philip J. Kain (1989). Kant and the Possibility of Uncategorized Experience. Idealistic Studies 19 (2):154-173.
  19.  24
    Philip J. Kain (1986). Marx, Justice, and the Dialectic Method. Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (4):523-546.
  20.  25
    Philip J. Kain (1983). Fichte, Marx, and the German Philosophical Tradition. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (1):116-117.
  21.  22
    Philip J. Kain (1986). The Young Marx and Kantian Ethics. Studies in East European Thought 31 (4):104-108.
    The young marx employs a concept of essence which in many ways is like that of aristotle and a concept of universalization much like that involved in kant's categorical imperative. at the same time, marx's task is to reconcile these elements. since our essence is a species essence, to work to realize the species' essence is also to work to satisfy universalizable needs--needs in accordance with the categorical imperative.
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  22. Philip J. Kain (1986). Marx' Method, Epistemology, and Humanism. D. Reidel.
    PHILIP J. KAIN MARX” METHOD, EPISTEMOLOGY, AND HUMANISM A Study in the Development oth's Thought D. REIDEL PUBLISHING COMPANY MARX' METHOD, EPISTEMOLOGY, AND HUMANISM SOVIETICA PUBLICATIONS AND  ...
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  23.  21
    Philip J. Kain (1992). Modern Feminism and Marx. Studies in East European Thought 44 (3):159-192.
  24.  9
    Philip J. Kain (1982). Schiller, Hegel, and Marx: State, Society, and the Aesthetic Ideal of Ancient Greece. McGill-Queen's University Press.
    Aesth. Hegel, Aesthetics Aesth. Ed. Schiller, On the Aesthetic Education of Man CI1PR Marx, Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right Civil War Marx, The Civil War in France CPE Marx, Critique of Political Economy Em. Hegel, Enzyklopadie der ...
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  25.  11
    Philip J. Kain (2002). Hegel, Antigone, and Women. The Owl of Minerva 33 (2):157-177.
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  26.  12
    Philip J. Kain (1995). Niccolò Machiavelli: Adviser of Princes. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):33 - 55.
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  27.  1
    Philip J. Kain (2014). Alienation and Market Socialism. The Owl of Minerva 46 (1):79-83.
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  28.  15
    Philip J. Kain (1984). Marx and the Abolition of Morality. Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (4):283-297.
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  29.  15
    Philip J. Kain (1982). Marx, Engels, and Dialectics. Studies in East European Thought 23 (4):271-283.
  30. Philip J. Kain (1983). Alfred Schmidt, History and Structure: An Essay on Hegelian, Marxist and Structuralist Themes Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 3 (5):249-250.
     
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  31.  14
    Philip J. Kain (1979). Estrangement and the Dictatorship of the Proletariat. Political Theory 7 (4):509-520.
  32.  9
    Philip J. Kain (1998). Hegel's Critique of Kantian Practical Reason. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):367 - 412.
    Hegel's critique of Kantian ethics is often thought to be shallow because readers have not recognized its extent. In large parts of Chapter V of the "Phenomenology" Hegel develops a concept of ethical life that brings together: (1) passion, interest, and involvement; (2) embedded in a cultural context in which we are free; all of which (3) is reinforced by the public, traditional, and objective values of a nation, and (4) within this context citizens reflect rationally and establish universal laws. (...)
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  33.  12
    Philip J. Kain (1983). History, Knowledge, and Essence in the Early Marx. Studies in East European Thought 25 (4):261-283.
    A careful study of the concept of essence which is found in Marx''s early writings will show that his theory of knowledge does not involve, as is often claimed, the acceptance of an unknown thing-in-itself and does not imply that we can only know objects as they have been constituted for-us. We can know things as they are in-themselves. To show this will also require that we recognize and explain how the early Marx can hold that the object of knowledge (...)
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  34.  3
    Philip J. Kain (2005). Hegel and the Other: A Study of the Phenomenology of Spirit. SUNY Press.
    A Study of the Phenomenology of Spirit Philip J. Kain. more important than the object. The object is nothing but an object-of-my- desire (A, I, 36/SW, XII, 64-5). Strangely enough — and this is another reason why desire is such an excellent ...
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  35. Philip J. Kain (1983). History, Knowledge, and Essence in the Early Marx. Studies in Soviet Thought 25 (4):261-283.
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  36. Philip J. Kain (1988). Hegel's Political Theory and Philosophy of History. Clio 17 (4):345-368.
     
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  37. Philip J. Kain (1989). Kant's Political Theory and Philosophy of History. Clio 18 (4):325-45.
     
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  38. Philip J. Kain (1988). Locke and the Development of Political Theory. Annals of Scholarship 5:334-61.
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  39. Philip J. Kain (1981). Labor, The State, and Aesthetic Theory in the Writings of Schiller. Interpretation 5 (2/3):263-78.
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  40. Philip J. Kain (1993). Marx and Modern Political Theory: From Hobbes to Contemporary Feminism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philip J. Kain deftly demonstrates the historical antecedents to and continuing relevance of Karl Marx's thought. Kain reveals the unappreciated pluralism of Marx, how it has endured and how it will continue to adapt to the challenges of modern day thought such as feminist theory.
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  41. Philip J. Kain (1992). Marx and Pluralism. Praxis International 11:465-86.
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  42. Philip J. Kain (1980). Marx's Dialectic Method. History and Theory 19 (3):294-312.
    The current issue over Marx's Grundrisse and Capital is whether these works represent a unity with or a rupture from his earlier writings. A third interpretation is more adequate than either of these: the new "dialectic method" of the later works transforms elements of his earlier outlooks into a new synthesis. In earlier works Marx describes three processes: the historical generation of the concrete, the historical development of categories, and the methodological ordering of these categories. However, his views changed on (...)
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  43. Philip J. Kain (1982). Marx, Engels, and Dialectics. Studies in Soviet Thought 23 (4):271-283.
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  44. Philip J. Kain (1992). Modern Feminism and Marx. Studies in Soviet Thought 44 (3):159-192.
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  45. Philip J. Kain (1987). Marx' Method, Epistemology, and Humanism: A Study in the Development of His Thought. Studies in Soviet Thought 34 (1):99-99.
     
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  46. Philip J. Kain (1993). Marx, Sahlins, and Ethnocentrism. Rethinking Marxism 6:79-101.
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  47. Philip J. Kain (1981). Marx's Theory of Ideas. History and Theory 20 (4):357-78.
    In The German Ideology , Marx developed his notion of "the materialist view of the world," which differed from both the earlier 1844 Manuscripts and the later Grundrisse, Critique of Political Economy, and Capital. First, whereas Marx had distinguished human life from other forms of life as the result of an essence, Marx now argued that material conditions determine the human condition. Second, ideas can affect human life but they are themselves the product of material conditions. Third, though he later (...)
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  48.  6
    Philip J. Kain (2009). Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence. Lexington Books.
    Horror -- The horror of existence -- Dionysian terror -- Tragedy -- Rebirth of the Greek ideal -- Dionysian life -- Three visions -- Truth -- The true and the good -- Avoiding the truth -- Taking to be true -- A consistent account of truth -- Chaos, the self, and will to power -- Meaningless suffering -- God is dead -- Chaos -- The Kantian self -- Forgetfulness -- The composite self -- Will to power -- Perspectivism -- The (...)
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  49. Philip J. Kain (1985). Richard Schacht, Nietzsche Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 5 (1):33-35.
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  50. Philip J. Kain (1986). Schiller, Hegel and Marx. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (1):124-124.
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