Search results for 'Philip Simon Gerrans' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philip Gerrans (2009). Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter , Ed., Moral Psychology Volume 2. The Cognitive Science of Morality: Intuition and Diversity , Cambridge, Mass.: Mit Press, 2008, Pp. XVIII + 585, Us$30 (Paper). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):525 – 528.score: 480.0
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  2. Philip Gerrans (forthcoming). Experience and Expectations: Bayesian Explanations of the Alternation Between the Capgras and Cotard Delusions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):145-148.score: 480.0
  3. Jeremy R. Simon (2006). The Proper Ends of Science: Philip Kitcher, Science, and the Good. Philosophy of Science 73 (2):194-214.score: 420.0
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher challenges the view that science has a single, context‐independent, goal, and that the pursuit of this goal is essentially immune from moral critique. He substitutes a context‐dependent account of science’s goal, and shows that this account subjects science to moral evaluation. I argue that Kitcher’s approach must be modified, as his account of science ultimately must be explicated in terms of moral concepts. I attempt, therefore, to give an account of science’s goal (...)
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  4. P. Gerrans & V. McGeer, Theory of Mind in Autism and Schizophrenia: A Case of Over-Optimistic Reverse Engineering.score: 300.0
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  5. Philip Gerrans & Jeanette Kennett (2010). Neurosentimentalism and Moral Agency. Mind 119 (475):585-614.score: 240.0
    Metaethics has recently been confronted by evidence from cognitive neuroscience that tacit emotional processes play an essential causal role in moral judgement. Most neuroscientists, and some metaethicists, take this evidence to vindicate a version of metaethical sentimentalism. In this paper we argue that the ‘dual process’ model of cognition that frames the discussion within and without philosophy does not do justice to an important constraint on any theory of deliberation and judgement. Namely, decision-making is the exercise of a capacity for (...)
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  6. Philip Gerrans (2002). A One-Stage Explanation of the Cotard Delusion. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 9 (1):47-53.score: 240.0
    Cognitive neuropsychiatry (CN) is the explanation of psychiatric disorder by the methods of cognitive neuropsychology. Within CN there are, broadly speaking, two approaches to delusion. The first uses a one-stage model, in which delusions are explained as rationalizations of anomalous experiences via reasoning strategies that are not, in themselves, abnormal. Two-stage models invoke additional hypotheses about abnormalities of reasoning. In this paper, I examine what appears to be a very strong argument, developed within CN, in favor of a twostage explanation (...)
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  7. Philip Gerrans, Tacit Knowledge, Rule Following and Pierre Bourdieu's Philosophy of Social Science.score: 240.0
    Pierre Bourdieu has developed a philosophy of social science, grounded in the phenomenological tradition, which treats knowledge as a practical ability embodied in skilful behaviour, rather than an intellectual capacity for the representation and manipulation of propositional knowledge. He invokes Wittgenstein’s remarks on rule-following as one way of explicating the idea that knowledge is a skill. Bourdieu’s conception of tacit knowledge is a dispositional one, adopted to avoid a perceived dilemma for methodological individualism. That dilemma requires either the explanation of (...)
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  8. Philip Gerrans (2002). The Theory of Mind Module in Evolutionary Psychology. Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):305-21.score: 240.0
    Evolutionary Psychology is based on the idea that the mind is a set of special purpose thinking devices or modules whose domain-specific structure is an adaptation to ancestral environments. The modular view of the mind is an uncontroversial description of the periphery of the mind, the input-output sensorimotor and affective subsystems. The novelty of EP is the claim that higher order cognitive processes also exhibit a modular structure. Autism is a primary case study here, interpreted as a developmental failure of (...)
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  9. Philip Gerrans & Valerie E. Stone (2008). Generous or Parsimonious Cognitive Architecture? Cognitive Neuroscience and Theory of Mind. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (2):121-141.score: 240.0
    Recent work in cognitive neuroscience on the child's Theory of Mind (ToM) has pursued the idea that the ability to metarepresent mental states depends on a domain-specific cognitive subystem implemented in specific neural circuitry: a Theory of Mind Module. We argue that the interaction of several domain-general mechanisms and lower-level domain-specific mechanisms accounts for the flexibility and sophistication of behavior, which has been taken to be evidence for a domain-specific ToM module. This finding is of more general interest since it (...)
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  10. Philip Gerrans (2000). Refining the Explanation of Cotard's Delusion. Mind and Language 15 (1):111-122.score: 240.0
    An elegant theory in cognitive neuropsychiatry explains the Capgras and Cotard delusions as resulting from the same type of anomalous phenomenal experience explained in different ways by different sufferers. ‘Although the Capgras and Cotard delusions are phenomenally distinct, we thus think that they represent patients’ attempts to make sense of fundamentally similar experiences’ (Young and Leafhead, 1996, p. 168). On the theory proposed by Young and Leafhead, the anomalous experience results from damage to an information processing subsystem which associates an (...)
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  11. Philip Gerrans (2001). Delusions as Performance Failures. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 6 (3).score: 240.0
    Delusions are explanations of anomalous experiences. A theory of delusion requires an explanation of both the anomalous experience _and _the apparently irrational explanation generated by the delusional subject. Hence, we require a model of rational belief formation against which the belief formation of delusional subjects can be evaluated. _Method. _I first describe such a model, distinguishing procedural from pragmatic rationality. Procedural rationality is the use of rules or procedures, deductive or inductive, that produce an inferentially coherent set of propositions. Pragmatic (...)
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  12. Philip Gerrans (2007). Mechanisms of Madness: Evolutionary Psychiatry Without Evolutionary Psychology. Biology and Philosophy 22 (1):35-56.score: 240.0
    Delusions are currently characterised as false beliefs produced by incorrect inference about external reality (DSM IV). This inferential conception has proved hard to link to explanations pitched at the level of neurobiology and neuroanatomy. This paper provides that link via a neurocomputational theory, based on evolutionary considerations, of the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating offline cognition. When pathologically neuromodulated the prefrontal cortex produces hypersalient experiences which monopolise offline cognition. The result is characteristic psychotic experiences and patterns of thought. (...)
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  13. Philip Gerrans (2007). Mental Time Travel, Somatic Markers and "Myopia for the Future". Synthese 159 (3):459 - 474.score: 240.0
    Patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) are often described as having impaired ability for planning and decision making despite retaining intact capacities for explicit reasoning. The somatic marker hypothesis is that the VMPFC associates implicitly represented affective information with explicit representations of actions or outcomes. Consequently, when the VMPFC is damaged explicit reasoning is no longer scaffolded by affective information, leading to characteristic deficits. These deficits are exemplified in performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) in which (...)
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  14. Philip Gerrans (2004). Cognitive Architecture and the Limits of Interpretationism. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (1):42-48.score: 240.0
  15. Philip Gerrans (2003). Nativism and Neuroconstructivism in the Explanation of Williams Syndrome. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):41-52.score: 240.0
    Nativists about syntactic processing have argued that linguisticprocessing, understood as the implementation of a rule-basedcomputational architecture, is spared in Williams syndrome, (WMS)subjects – and hence that it provides evidence for a geneticallyspecified language module. This argument is bolstered by treatingSpecific Language Impairments (SLI) and WMS as a developmental doubledissociation which identifies a syntax module. Neuroconstructivists haveargued that the cognitive deficits of a developmental disorder cannot beadequately distinguished using the standard gross behavioural tests ofneuropsychology and that the linguistic abilities of the (...)
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  16. Philip Gerrans (2004). The Disposition of Things: Spontaneous Order in the Esprit des Lois 1. The European Legacy 9 (6):751-765.score: 240.0
    The article states that in the "Esprit des Lois" Charles Louis de Secondat Montesquieu famously proposes a version of the doctrine of the separation of judicial, executive and legislative power as a way of protecting political liberty ("the opinion each has of his security"). Given the context in which he situates his arguments: an immense and theoretically opaque excursus which discusses almost everything known to political theory, anthropology and economics before his time, and essentially descriptive methodology, it is not easy (...)
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  17. Kathleen Akins & Philip Gerrans (2003). Introduction. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):1-11.score: 240.0
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  18. Philip Gerrans & Jeanette Kennett (2006). Introduction. Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):3 – 12.score: 240.0
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  19. Philip Gerrans (2004). Individualism and Cognitive Development. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):107-108.score: 240.0
    Individualism is not inconsistent with social interaction; it is required to explain it. Social exchanges, evidenced in gaze monitoring, social referencing, emotional responses, protodeclarative and imperative pointing, pretence, play, and conversation all play a role in development, but the nature of that role is opaque without an understanding of the cognitive mechanisms on which they depend.
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  20. Philip Gerrans (1998). The Norms of Cognitive Development. Mind and Language 13 (1):56-75.score: 240.0
  21. Garrett Cullity & Philip Gerrans (2004). Agency and Policy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 104 (3):315–325.score: 240.0
    The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com.
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  22. Philip Gerrans (2002). Nativism, Neuroconstructivism, and Developmental Disorder. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):757-758.score: 240.0
    Either genetically specified modular cognitive architecture for syntactic processing does not exist (neuroconstructivism), or there is a module but its development is so abnormal in Williams syndrome (WS) that no conclusion can be drawn about its normal architecture (moderate nativism). Radical nativism, which holds that WS is a case of intact syntax, is untenable. Specific Language Impairment and WS create a dilemma that radical nativism cannot accommodate.
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  23. Philip Gerrans (2003). The Motor of Cognition. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):510-512.score: 240.0
    Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  24. Philip Gerrans (2001). Authorship and Ownership of Thoughts. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2):231-237.score: 240.0
  25. Philip Gerrans (2013). Delusional Attitudes and Default Thinking. Mind and Language 28 (1):83-102.score: 240.0
    Jennifer Radden has drawn attention to two features of delusion, ambivalence and subjectivity, which are problematic for theories of delusion that treat delusions as empirical beliefs. She argues for an ‘attitude’ theory of delusion. I argue that once the cognitive architecture of delusion formation is properly described the debate between doxastic and attitude theorists loses its edge. That architecture suggests that delusions are produced by activity in the ‘default mode network’ unsupervised by networks required for decontextualized processing. The cognitive properties (...)
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  26. Philip Gerrans (1998). How to Be a Conformist, Part II. Simulation and Rule Following. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (4):566 – 586.score: 240.0
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  27. Philip Gerrans & David Sander (2014). Feeling the Future: Prospects for a Theory of Implicit Prospection. Biology and Philosophy 29 (5):699-710.score: 240.0
    Mental time travel refers to the ability of an organism to project herself backward and forward in time, using episodic memory and imagination to simulate past and future experiences. The evolution of mental time travel gives humans a unique capacity for prospection: the ability to pre-experience the future. Discussions of mental time travel treat it as an instance of explicit prospection. We argue that implicit simulations of past and future experience can also be used as a way of gaining information (...)
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  28. Philip Gerrans (1999). Delusional Misidentification as Subpersonal Disintegration. The Monist 82 (4):590-608.score: 240.0
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  29. Philip Gerrans & Kevin Mulligan (2013). Immaginazione, default thinking e incorporamento. Rivista di Estetica 53 (53):55-87.score: 240.0
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  30. Philip S. Gerrans (2013). Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning. Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.score: 240.0
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the nature and (...)
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  31. Philip Gerrans & Klaus Scherer (2013). Wired for Despair The Neurochemistry of Emotion and the Phenomenology of Depression. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.score: 240.0
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  32. Philip Gerrans (2012). Dream Experience and a Revisionist Account of Delusions of Misidentification. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):217-227.score: 240.0
    Standard accounts of delusion explain them as responses to experience. Cognitive models of feature binding in the face recognition systems explain how experiences of mismatch between feelings of "familiarity" and faces can arise. Similar mismatches arise in phenomena such as déjà and jamais vu in which places and scenes are mismatched to feelings of familiarity. These cognitive models also explain similarities between the phenomenology of these delusions and some dream states which involve mismatch between faces, feelings of familiarity and identities. (...)
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  33. Philip J. Candilis, Charles W. Lidz, Paul S. Appelbaum, Robert M. Arnold, William Gardner, Suzanne Garverich, Albert J. Grudzinskas Jr & Lorna J. Simon (2012). The Silent Majority: Who Speaks at IRB Meetings? Irb 34 (4):15.score: 240.0
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  34. Philip Gerrans (2006). La lecture de pensée pour débutants. Philosophiques 33 (1):125-145.score: 240.0
    Some evolutionary psychologists (EP) are strong nativists about Theory of Mind (TOM). They argue that the development of specialised cognitive competence required for TOM requires genetic specification of the developmental trajectory of a specialised cognitive system. EP arrives at this conclusion via conceptual arguments concerning the inadequacy of blank slate neuroconstructivism (strong neuroconstructivism) and empirical evidence from developmental and neuropsychology. I argue that the correct understanding of the conceptual argument applied to the case of TOM supports a moderate form of (...)
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  35. Brendan A. Maher, A. W. Young, Philip Gerrans, John Campbell, Kai Vogeley, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Owen Flanagan, Robert L. Woolfolk, Barry Smith & Joëlle Proust (1999). Cognitive Theories of Mental Illness. The Monist 82 (4).score: 240.0
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  36. Philip J. Candilis, Charles W. Lidz, Paul S. Appelbaum, Robert M. Arnold, William P. Gardner, Suzanne Myers, Albert J. Grudzinskas Jr & Lorna J. Simon (2012). The Silent Majority: Who Speaks at IRB Meetings. Irb 34 (4):15-20.score: 240.0
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  37. Terry Dartnall, Steve Torrance, Mark Coulson, Stephen Nunn, Brendan Kitts, R. F. Port, T. Van Gelder, Donald Peterson & Philip Gerrans (1996). Cognitive Science. Metascience 5 (1):95-166.score: 240.0
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  38. Philip Gerrans (2003). A Case of Over-Optimistic Reverse Engineering. In B. Repacholi & V. Slaughter (eds.), Individual Differences in Theory of Mind: Implications for Typical and Atypical Development. Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press. 269.score: 240.0
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  39. Joshua Simon (2012). Simon Bolívar's Republican Imperialism: Another Ideology of American Revolution. History of Political Thought 33 (2):280-304.score: 210.0
    This article treats the political thought of Simón Bolívar, a leading figure in South America's struggle for independence. It describes Bolívar's ideas by reference to both their broadly Atlantic origins and their specifically American concerns, arguing that they comprise a theory of `republican imperialism', paradoxically proposing an essentially imperial project as a means of winning and consolidating independence from European rule. This basic tension is traced through Bolívar's discussions of revolution, constitutions, and territorial unification, and then used to frame a (...)
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  40. Anthony O. Simon (ed.) (1998). Acquaintance with the Absolute: The Philosophy of Yves R. Simon: Essays and Bibliography. Fordham University Press.score: 210.0
    Acquaintance with the Absolute is the first collected volume of essays devoted to the thought of Yves r. Simon, a thinker widely regarded as one of the great teachers and philosophers of our time. Each piece in this collection of essays thoughtfully complements the others to offer a qualifiedly panoramic look at the work and thought of philosopher Yves R. Simon. The six essays presented not only treat some major areas of Simon’s thought, pointing out their lucidity (...)
     
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  41. H. Simon (2001). On Simulating Simon : His Monomania, and its Sources in Bounded Rationality. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (3):501-505.score: 180.0
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  42. Paule Simon (1963). The Papers of Yves R. Simon. New Scholasticism 37 (4):501-507.score: 180.0
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  43. Anthony O. Simon (1975). Bibliographie d'Yves René Simon. Complément (1969-1974). Revue Philosophique De Louvain 73 (18):362-367.score: 180.0
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  44. Yves R. Simon (1948). Three Lectures by Yves R. Simon Condensed by the Editor. Renascence 1 (1):35-39.score: 180.0
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  45. Anne Simon (2007). Thematic Files-Science, Texts and Contexts. In Honor of Gerard Simon -Interdisciplinarity and Intersubjectivity: Literary Studies and the History of Science. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 60 (1):9-24.score: 180.0
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  46. Leonard A. Cole (1996). Gene Worries The Lives to Come: The Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities Philip Kitcher Simon Schuster. BioScience 46 (9):708-709.score: 120.0
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  47. Philip Turetzky (2009). The Logic of Expression: Quality, Quantity and Intensity in Spinoza, Hegel and Deleuze, by Simon Duffy. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):341-345.score: 36.0
    If the import of a book can be assessed by the problem it takes on, how that problem unfolds, and the extent of the problem’s fruitfulness for further exploration and experimentation, then Duffy has produced a text worthy of much close attention. Duffy constructs an encounter between Deleuze’s creation of a concept of difference in Difference and Repetition (DR) and Deleuze’s reading of Spinoza in Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza (EP). It is surprising that such an encounter has not already been (...)
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  48. Philip Mirowski (1999). A Beautiful Mind, Sylvia Nasar. Simon & Schuster, 1998, 461 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 15 (02):302-.score: 36.0
  49. Simon van Rysewyk, Philip Ball on Neuroaesthetics.score: 36.0
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