Search results for 'Philip Stratton–Lake' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philip Stratton Lake (2008). Being Virtuous and the Virtues : Two Aspects of Kant's Doctrine of Virtue. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter
     
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  2.  3
    Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Philip Stratton-Lake, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth, London, Routledge, 2000, Pp. Xi + 153. Utilitas 15 (2):248-249.
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  3.  8
    Thomas Carson (2004). Philip Stratton‐Lake, Ed., Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations:Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations. Ethics 115 (1):175-177.
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  4. Govert den Hartogh, Andrew Altman, Christopher Heath Wellman, Andrew Jason Cohen, Sarah Conly & Thomas Christiano (2004). 10. Philip Stratton‐Lake, Ed., Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations Philip Stratton‐Lake, Ed., Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations (Pp. 175-177). [REVIEW] Ethics 115 (1).
     
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  5.  38
    Roger Crisp (2009). Goodness and Reasons: A Response to Stratton-Lake. Mind 118 (472):1095-1099.
    This article is a response to some of Philip Stratton-Lake’s criticisms of an earlier paper of mine in this journal, on the so-called ‘buck-passing’ account of goodness. Some elucidation is offered of the ‘wrong kind of reasons’ problem and of T. M. Scanlon’s view, and the question is raised of the role of goodness in the view outlined by Stratton-Lake.
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  6. Philip Stratton-Lake (ed.) (2002). The Right and the Good. Clarendon Press.
    The Right and the Good, a classic of twentieth-century philosophy by the great scholar Sir David Ross, is now presented in a new edition with a substantial introduction by Philip Stratton-Lake, a leading expert on Ross. Ross's book is the pinnacle of ethical intuitionism, which was the dominant moral theory in British philosophy for much of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Intuitionism is now enjoying a considerable revival, and Stratton-Lake provides the context for a proper understanding of Ross's (...)
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  7.  18
    Anne Margaret Baxley (2004). Review: Stratton-Lake, Phillip, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth. [REVIEW] Kant-Studien 95 (3):388-389.
  8.  14
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2003). Review: Stratton-Lake, Duty and Moral Worth. Ethics 113 (3):721-724.
  9.  12
    Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Review: Stratton-Lake, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth. Utilitas 15 (02):248-.
  10.  11
    Brad Hooker (1997). Reply to Stratton-Lake. Mind 106 (424):759-760.
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  11.  62
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2000). Kant, Duty, and Moral Worth. Routledge.
    Kant, Duty and Moral Worth tackles the debate over whether or not Kant said moral actions have worth only if they are carried out from duty or whether actions carried out from mixed motives can be good. Stratton-Lake offers a unique account of acting from duty which utilizes the distinction between primary and secondary motives. He maintains that moral law should not be understood as normative moral reason but as playing a transcendental role. Thus, a Kantian account of moral worth (...)
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  12. W. D. Ross (2002). The Right and the Good. Clarendon Press.
    The Right and the Good, a classic of twentieth-century philosophy by the eminent scholar Sir David Ross, is now presented in a new edition with a substantial introduction by Philip Stratton-Lake, a leading expert on Ross. Ross's book is the pinnacle of ethical intuitionism, which was the dominant moral theory in British philosophy for much of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Intuitionism is now enjoying a considerable revival, and Stratton-Lake provides the context for a proper understanding of Ross's (...)
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  13. David Ross (2002). The Right and the Good. Clarendon Press.
    The Right and the Good, a classic of twentieth-century philosophy by the great scholar Sir David Ross, is now presented in a new edition with a substantial introduction by Philip Stratton-Lake, a leading expert on Ross. Ross's book is the pinnacle of ethical intuitionism, which was the dominant moral theory in British philosophy for much of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Intuitionism is now enjoying a considerable revival, and Stratton-Lake provides the context for a proper understanding of Ross's (...)
     
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  14.  62
    Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons (eds.) (2006). Metaethics After Moore. Oxford University Press.
    Metaethics, understood as a distinct branch of ethics, is often traced to G. E. Moore's 1903 classic, Principia Ethica. Whereas normative ethics is concerned to answer first-order moral questions about what is good and bad, right and wrong, metaethics is concerned to answer second-order non-moral questions about the semantics, metaphysics, and epistemology of moral thought and discourse. Moore has continued to exert a powerful influence, and the sixteen essays here (most of them specially written for the volume) represent the most (...)
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  15.  90
    Gerald Lang (2008). The Right Kind of Solution to the Wrong Kind of Reason Problem. Utilitas 20 (4):472-489.
    Recent discussion of Scanlon's account of value, which analyses the value of X in terms of agents' reasons for having certain pro-attitudes or contra-attitudes towards X, has generated the problem (WKR problem): this is the problem, for the buck-passing view, of being able to acknowledge that there may be good reasons for attributing final value to X that have nothing to do with the final value that X actually possesses. I briefly review some of the existing solutions offered to the (...)
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  16.  62
    Philip Stratton‐Lake (2005). How to Deal with Evil Demons: Comment on Rabinowicz and Rønnow‐Rasmussen. Ethics 115 (4):788-798.
  17.  96
    David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2003). Can Scanlon Avoid Redundancy by Passing the Buck? Analysis 63 (4):328–331.
    Scanlon suggests a buck-passing account of goodness. To say that something is good is not to give a reason to, say, favour it; rather it is to say that there are such reasons. When it comes to wrongness, however, Scanlon rejects a buck-passing account: to say that j ing is wrong is, on his view, to give a sufficient moral reason not to j. Philip Stratton-Lake 2003 argues that Scanlon can evade a redundancy objection against his (Scanlon’s) view of (...)
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  18.  26
    Elizabeth Tropman (2014). Varieties of Moral Intuitionism. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (2):177-194.
    Moral intuitionism is the view that we can know or justifiably believe some moral facts directly, without inferring them from other evidence or proof. While intuitionism is frequently dismissed as implausible, the theory has received renewed interest in the literature.See Robert Audi, The Good in the Right: A Theory of Intuition and Intrinsic Value (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004); Jill Graper Hernandez (ed.), The New Intuitionism (London: Continuum, 2011); Michael Huemer, Ethical Intuitionism (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005); Sabine Roeser, Moral (...)
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  19.  26
    Jeffrey Brand-ballard (2007). Why One Basic Principle? Utilitas 19 (2):220-242.
    Principle monists believe that our moral duties, such as fidelity and non-maleficence, can be justified in terms of one basic moral principle. Principle pluralists disagree, some suggesting that only an excessive taste for simplicity or a desire to mimic natural science could lead one to endorse monism. In Ideal Code, Real World (Oxford, 2000), Brad Hooker defends a monist theory, employing the method of reflective equilibrium to unify the moral duties under a version of rule consequentialism. Hooker's arguments have drawn (...)
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  20.  23
    Alan Thomas, Maxims and Thick Ethical Concepts: Reply to Moore.
    Adrian Moore’s paper continues the development of a radical re-interpretation of Kant’s practical philosophy initiated by his Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty. [Moore, 2003] I have discussed elsewhere why it seems to me that Moore’s work, taken as a composite with that of his co-symposiasts today Philip Stratton-Lake and Burt Louden, adds up to a comprehensive and radical re-assessment of the contemporary significance of Kant’s practical philosophy which moral philosophers generally ought not to ignore. [Thomas, 2004] Moore states (...)
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  21.  21
    Philip Stratton-Lake & Brad Hooker (2006). Scanlon Versus Moore on Goodness. In Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons (eds.), Metaethics After Moore. Oxford University Press 149.
  22.  96
    Philip Stratton–Lake (2003). Scanlon's Contractualism and the Redundancy Objection. Analysis 63 (277):70–76.
    Ebbhinghaus, H., J. Flum, and W. Thomas. 1984. Mathematical Logic. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag. Forster, T. Typescript. The significance of Yablo’s paradox without self-reference. Available from http://www.dpmms.cam.ac.uk. Gold, M. 1965. Limiting recursion. Journal of Symbolic Logic 30: 28–47. Karp, C. 1964. Languages with Expressions of Infinite Length. Amsterdam.
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  23.  70
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2003). Scanlon, Permissions, and Redundancy: Response to McNaughton and Rawling. Analysis 63 (4):332–337.
    According to one formulation of Scanlon’s contractualist principle, certain acts are wrong if they are permitted by principles that are reasonably rejectable because they permit such acts. According to the redundancy objection, if a principle is reasonably rejectable because it permits actions which have feature F, such actions are wrong simply in virtue of having F and not because their having F makes principles permitting them reasonably rejectable. Consequently Scanlon’s contractualist principle adds nothing to the reasons we have not to (...)
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  24.  78
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2003). Scanlon’s Contractualism and the Redundancy Objection. Analysis 63 (1):70-76.
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  25.  38
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2009). Roger Crisp on Goodness and Reasons. Mind 118 (472):1081-1094.
    Roger Crisp distinguishes a positive and a negative aspect of the buck-passing account of goodness (BPA), and argues that the positive account should be dropped in order to avoid certain problems, in particular, that it implies eliminativism about value. This eliminativism involves what I call an ontological claim, the claim that there is no real property of goodness, and an error theory, the claim that all value talk is false. I argue first that the positive aspect of the BPA is (...)
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  26.  47
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2011). Recalcitrant Pluralism. Ratio 24 (4):364-383.
    In this paper I argue that the best form of deontology is one understood in terms of prima facie duties. I outline how these duties are to be understood and show how they offer a plausible and elegant connection between the reason why we ought to do certain acts, the normative reasons we have to do these acts, the reason why moral agents will do them, and the reasons certain people have to resent someone who does not do them. I (...)
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  27.  71
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1997). Can Hooker's Rule-Consequentialist Principle Justify Ross's Prima Facie Duties? Mind 106 (424):751-758.
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  28.  67
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1998). Internalism and the Explanation of Belief/Motivation Changes. Analysis 58 (4):311–315.
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  29.  35
    Philip Stratton-Lake, Being Virtuous and the Virtues: Two Aspects of Kant's Doctrine of Virtue.
    In Moniker Betzler (Ed.), <span class='Hi'>Kant</span>’s Virtue Ethics, (Walter deGruyter: New York – Berlin, 2007).
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  30.  6
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2006). A Review of Bernard Gert's Common Morality: Deciding What to Do. [REVIEW] Teaching Ethics 7 (1):57-61.
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  31.  26
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1993). Reason, Appropriateness and Hope: Sketch of a Kantian Account of a Finite Rationality. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 1 (1):61 – 80.
  32.  30
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1999). Why Externalism is Not a Problem for Ethical Intuitionists. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (1):77–90.
    Ethical intuitionists are often criticised on the ground that their view makes it possible for an agent to believe that she ought to ? whilst lacking any motive to ?-that is, on the ground that it involves, or implies a form of externalism. I begin by distinguishing this form of externalism (what I call 'belief externalism') from two other forms of ethical externalism-moral externalism, and reasons externalism. I then consider various reasons why one might think that ethical intuitionism is defective (...)
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  33. Philip Stratton-Lake (2013). Rational Intuitionism. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  34. Philip Stratton-Lake (2010). Intuitionism. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge
     
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  35.  12
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1993). Formulating Categorical Imperatives. Kant-Studien 84 (3):317-340.
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  36.  5
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1998). Kant and Contemporary Ethics. Kantian Review 2 (1):1-13.
    It is difficult to exaggerate the extent to which Kant has influenced contemporary ethics. Whether or not one is sympathetic to his moral theory, one cannot ignore it, or the various ethical theories which draw their inspiration from it. Debates which have centred on Kantian themes include debates about whether moral requirements are categorical imperatives, whether they have an overriding authority, whether the various moral judgements we make can be codified, the role of duty in moral motivation, whether there are (...)
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  37.  19
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2000). Expression, Description and Normativity. Res Publica 6 (1):117-125.
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  38.  3
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2013). Dancy on Buck-Passing. In David Bakhurst, Margaret Olivia Little & Brad Hooker (eds.), Thinking About Reasons: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Dancy. Oxford University Press
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  39.  13
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1999). Recent Work on Kant's Ethics. Philosophical Books 40 (4):209-218.
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  40.  15
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2002). Review of Brian Hutchinson, G. E. Moore's Ethical Theory: Resistance and Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (9).
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  41.  1
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2015). On W. D. Ross’s “The Basis of Objective Judgments in Ethics”. Ethics 125 (2):521-524,.
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  42.  3
    Philip Stratton-Lake (1997). Review: Korsgaard, Creating the Kingdom of Ends. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 1 (1):177-185.
  43.  6
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2005). Review of Bernard Gert, Common Morality: Deciding What to Do. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (6).
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  44.  1
    Philip Stratton‐Lake (2013). Ross, WD. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
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  45.  1
    Philip Stratton-Lake (2009). Ethical Choice. In John Shand (ed.), Central Issues of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
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  46. William J. FitzPatrick, Gerhard Øverland, Talbot Brewer, David Enoch & Philip Stratton‐Lake (2005). 2.“Doing and Allowing” and Doing and Allowing “Doing and Allowing” and Doing and Allowing (Pp. 799-808). Ethics 115 (4).
     
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  47.  0
    Desmond Paul Henry, Hilary Gatti, Laura Benítez, Richard Ashcraft, J.⊘Rn Sch⊘Sler, D. D. Raphael, Ralph C. S. Walker, Christopher Adair‐Toteff, Philip Stratton‐Lake, Aldo Lanfranconi, Alan P. F. Sell & Ian Rumfitt (1995). Book Review. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (1):161-207.
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  48. Philip Stratton-Lake (2011). Eliminativism About Derivative Prima Facie Duties. In Thomas Hurka (ed.), Underivative Duty: British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing. OUP Oxford
     
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  49. Philip Stratton-Lake (1991). Kant’s Theory of Freedom. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 59.
     
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  50.  24
    Philip Stratton-Lake (ed.) (2004). On What We Owe to Each Other. Blackwell.
    In "On What We Owe to Each Other," five leading moral philosophers assess various aspects of Scanlon's moral theory as laid out in this seminal work.
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