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  1. Philip Turetzky (2011). Husserl and the Promise of Time: Subjectivity in Transcendental Phenomenology, by Nicolas de Warren. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009, 322 Pp. ISBN 978-0-5218-7679-7 Hb £50.00. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 19 (4):654-658.
    The problem of time consciousness was not only thought by Husserl to be the most difficult problem of phenomenology, it may legitimately claim to be, as Nicolas de Warren argues in this thought provoking book, at the root of the phenomenological project itself. For, understanding the claims Husserl makes for the fundamental status of transcendental subjectivity are required by and clarified through the detailed analysis of time consciousness.
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  2. Philip Turetzky (2009). The Logic of Expression: Quality, Quantity and Intensity in Spinoza, Hegel and Deleuze, by Simon Duffy. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):341-345.
    If the import of a book can be assessed by the problem it takes on, how that problem unfolds, and the extent of the problem’s fruitfulness for further exploration and experimentation, then Duffy has produced a text worthy of much close attention. Duffy constructs an encounter between Deleuze’s creation of a concept of difference in Difference and Repetition (DR) and Deleuze’s reading of Spinoza in Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza (EP). It is surprising that such an encounter has not already been (...)
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  3. Philip Turetzky (2005). Pictorial Depth: Intensity and Aesthetic Surface. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 15 (1):1-28.
    Philosophers seldom ask questions regarding how certain phenomena occur, because such questions tend to be the province of the sciences or of technology. However, the question how pictures have depth requires philosophical reflection because it takes place on the surface of pictorial objects and involves both physical and phenomenal, i.e. aesthetic, features of those surfaces. This essay examines how pictures have depth by first separating the aesthetic question from interpretive considerations, and thereby refining the question how pictures have depth. Next (...)
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  4. Philip Turetzky & Quentin Smith (2000). Reviews-Time. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):927-934.
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  5. Philip Turetzky (1998). Time. Routledge.
    Time is the only book that offers a comprehensive history of the philosophy of time in western philosophy from the Greeks through the 20th century. Philip Turetzky explores theories in ancient and modern philosophy chronologically, from Aristotle to Nietzsche. He then describes the philosophy of time in three 20th century philosophical traditions: analytic philosophy, phenomenology and the distaff tradition. The book compares and contrasts the way these traditions treat time in regard to appearances, empiricism, existence, privileged ontological relations, and pragmatic (...)
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  6. Philip Turetzky (1989). Immanent Critique. Philosophy Today 33 (2):144-158.
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  7. Philip Turetzky (1988). Metaphor and Paraphrase. Philosophy and Rhetoric 21 (3):205 - 219.
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