Search results for 'Philip of Opus' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Franklin Philip (ed.) (1986). Philosophical Works of Etienne Bonnot, Abbe de Condillac: Volume Ii. Psychology Press.
    This is the first English translation of Condillac's most influential works: the Essay on the Origins of Human Knowledge and Course for Study of Instruction of the Prince of Parma. The Essays lay the foundation for Condillac's theory of mind. He argues that all mental operations are, in fact, sensory processes and nothing more. An outgrowth of Locke's empirical account of ideas and sensations as a source of knowledge, Condillac's theory goes beyond Locke's foundations, introducing his universal method for understanding (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  17
    Jonathan Barnes (1977). The Epinomis Leonardo Tarán: Academica: Plato, Philip of Opus, and the Pseudo-Platonic Epinomis. Pp. Viii + 417. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1975. Cloth, $20. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (02):170-171.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Leonardo Tarán (1975). Academica--Plato, Philip of Opus, and the Pseudo-Platonic Epinomis. American Philosophical Society.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Phillip Sidney Horky (2009). Persian Cosmos and Greek Philosophy: Plato's Associates and the Zoroastrian Magoi. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 37:47-103.
    Immediately upon the death of Plato in 347 BCE, philosophers in the Academy began to circulate stories involving his encounters with wisdom practitioners from Persia. This article examines the history of Greek perceptions of Persian wisdom and argues that the presence of foreign wisdom practitioners in the history of Greek philosophy has been undervalued since Diogenes Laertius.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  31
    Willem B. Drees (1999). God and Contemporary Science: Philip Clayton's Defense of Panentheism. Zygon 34 (3):515-525.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  6
    G. T. Griffith (1970). Philip of Macedon's Early Interventions in Thessaly (358–352 B.C.). Classical Quarterly 20 (01):67-.
    In his stimulating article on this topic Mr. Christopher Ehrhardt sought to show that there is no good reason to believe in any intervention by Philip of Macedon in Thessaly earlier than his campaign of 353. The second half of his paper is devoted to the date of Philip's capture of Pagasae, which Diodorus appears to put in the Athenian archon year 354/3 after the fall of Methone, a date adopted by most modern interpreters accepting the emendation for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  2
    Christopher Ehrhardt (1967). Two Notes on Philip of Macedon's First Interventions In Thessaly. Classical Quarterly 17 (02):296-.
    This passage comes at the end of Diodorus' account of the archon year 357/6 and obviously contains a proleptic reference to the future fortunes of the tyrannicides, Tisiphonus, Lycophron, . Tisiphonus died probably in 355 or early in 354; Lycophron and Peitholaus were expelled from Pherae by Philip in 352.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  13
    Farzad Mahootian (2013). Paneth's Epistemology of Chemical Elements in Light of Kant's Opus Postumum. Foundations of Chemistry 15 (2):171-184.
    Friedrich Paneth’s conception of “chemical element” has functioned as the official definition adopted by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry since 1923. Paneth maintains a distinction between empirical and “transcendental” concepts of element; furthermore, chemical science requires fluctuation between the two. The origin of the empirical-transcendental split is found in Immanuel Kant’s classic Critique of Pure Reason (1781/1787). The present paper examines Paneth’s foundational concept of element in light of Kant’s attempt, late in life, to revoke key distinctions (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  61
    Jaana Eigi (2012). Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  56
    Bence Nanay (2013). From Philosophy of Science to Philosophy of Literature (and Back) Via Philosophy of Mind. Philip Kitcher’s Philosophical Pendulum. Theoria (77):257-264.
    A recent focus of Philip Kitcher’s research has been, somewhat surprisingly in the light of his earlier work, the philosophical analyses of literary works and operas. Some may see a discontinuity in Kitcher’s oeuvre in this respect – it may be difficult to see how his earlier contributions to philosophy of science relate to this much less mainstream approach to philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show that there is no such discontinuity: Kitcher’s contributions to the philosophy (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Geoffrey Brennan, Robert E. Goodin & Michael A. Smith (eds.) (2007). Common Minds: Themes From the Philosophy of Philip Pettit. Oxford University Press.
    During a career spanning over thirty years Philip Pettit has made seminal contributions in moral philosophy, political philosophy, philosophy of the social sciences, philosophy of mind and action, and metaphysics. The corpus of work Pettit has contributed and stimulated is all the more remarkable because of the way in which Pettit and his circle adapt lessons learned when thinking about problems in one area of philosophy to problems in a completely different area. -/- Common Minds presents specially written papers (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Wenceslao J. González (ed.) (2011). Scientific Realism and Democratic Society: The Philosophy of Philip Kitcher. Rodopi.
    Philip Kitcher is among the key philosophers of science of our times. This volume offers an up to date analysis of his philosophical perspective taking into account his views on scientific realism and democratic society. The contributors to the volume focus on four different aspects of Kitcher’s thought: the evolution of his philosophy, his present views on scientific realism, the epistemological analysis of his modest realism, and his conception of scientific practice. In the final chapter, the philosopher replies to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  64
    Michael J. McNeal (2013). Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence by Philip J. Kain (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):123-125.
    In Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence, Philip J. Kain makes a compelling case for taking Nietzsche’s concern with the subject of horror seriously and then challenges his conclusions about it. A corollary of existence, horror is an ineliminable part of being human. Our experience of horror prompts reflection on life and the act of philosophizing. Arguing it is a formative yet often overlooked theme in Nietzsche’s oeuvre, Kain recognizes that the experience of horror is central to “Nietzsche’s vision” (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  22
    M. Solomon (1995). Legend Naturalism and Scientific Progress: An Essay on Philip Kitcher's the Advancement of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):205-218.
    Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science sets out, programmatically, a new naturalistic view of science as a process of building consensus practices. Detailed historical case studies--centrally, the Darwinian revolution--are intended to support this view. I argue that Kitcher's expositions in fact support a more conservative view, that I dub 'Legend Naturalism'. Using four historical examples which increasingly challenge Kitcher's discussions, I show that neither Legend Naturalism, nor the less conservative programmatic view, gives an adequate account of scientific progress. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  6
    Martin Shuster (2014). Kant's Opus Postumum and McDowell's Critique of Kant. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (4):427-444.
    In this article, I have a modest goal: to sketch how Kant can avoid the charge of “subjective idealism” advanced against him by John McDowell and to do so with reference to Kant's last work, the so-called Opus Postumum. I am interested in defending Kant on this point because doing so not only shows how we need not—at least not because of this point about idealism—jump ship from Kant to Hegel , but also suggests that the Opus Postumum (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  23
    Jeremy R. Simon (2006). The Proper Ends of Science: Philip Kitcher, Science, and the Good. Philosophy of Science 73 (2):194-214.
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher challenges the view that science has a single, context‐independent, goal, and that the pursuit of this goal is essentially immune from moral critique. He substitutes a context‐dependent account of science’s goal, and shows that this account subjects science to moral evaluation. I argue that Kitcher’s approach must be modified, as his account of science ultimately must be explicated in terms of moral concepts. I attempt, therefore, to give an account of science’s goal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  11
    Dyzenhaus David (2013). Critical Notice of On the People's Terms: A Republican Theory and Model of Democracy, by Philip Pettit, Cambridge University Press, 2012, Xii+333pp. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):494-513.
    (2013). Critical notice of On the people's terms: a Republican theory and model of democracy, by Philip Pettit, Cambridge University Press, 2012, xii+333pp. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 43, No. 4, pp. 494-513.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  8
    Inmaculada Perdomo (2012). The Characterization of Epistemology in Philip Kitcher: A Critical Reflection From New Empiricism. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 101 (1):113-138.
    While the earlier work of Philip Kitcher, in particular The Advancement of Science (1993), continues to inform his more recent studies, such as Science, Truth, and Democracy (2001), there are significant "changes of opinion" from those articulated in the 1990s. One may even speak of two different stages in the configuration of epistemological proposals. An analysis, from an empiricist standpoint, of the shifts between one and the other indicates further evolution towards realist positions but much more modest ones than (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    Ralph Wedgwood (1996). Review of "The Common Mind: An Essay on Psychology, Society, and Politics" by Philip Pettit. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):111-115.
    This is a review of Philip Pettit's book "The Common Mind: An Essay on Psychology, Society, and Politics".
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. David Goodman (1983). Philip II's Patronage of Science and Engineering. British Journal for the History of Science 16 (1):49-66.
    Philip II a patron of the sciences? This aspect of his turbulent reign, like many others, bas brought conflicting assessments. He bas been praised for his enterprise and blamed for isolating Spain from the scientific revolution. More information has now become available as a resuit of research on related themes, and it seems opportune to reconsider Philip's relations with the sciences. This has not attracted much attention outside of Spain because of the general neglect of the history of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Philip L. Quinn & Paul J. Weithman (eds.) (2008). Liberal Faith: Essays in Honor of Philip Quinn. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Philip Quinn, John A. O’Brien Professor at the University of Notre Dame from 1985 until his death in 2004, was well known for his work in the philosophy of religion, political philosophy, and core areas of analytic philosophy. Although the breadth of his interests was so great that it would be virtually impossible to identify any subset of them as representative, the contributors to this volume provide an excellent introduction to, and advance the discussion of, some of the questions (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  9
    F. W. Walbank (1943). Alcaeus of Messene, Philip V, and Rome. Classical Quarterly 37 (1-2):1-.
    From what has already been said it will be clear that Alcaeus of Messene, like the anonymous author of Anth. Pal. xvi. 6, was a supporter of Philip V at least until 201 B.C., that is, until the Second Macedonian War. The view that his breach with Philip followed the Messenian events of 215–214 has, however, been so frequently upheld that it deserves consideration. It appears to be based on one or more of the following assumptions. Philip's (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  2
    G. T. Griffith & G. Cawkwell (1980). Philip of Macedon. Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:254.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  18
    Paul Vincent Spade, Thomas Aquinas on the Mixture of the Elements, to Master Philip of Castrocaeli.
    seem to be a kind of corruption of the elements and not a mixture. Again, if the substantial form of a mixed body is the act of matter without presupposing the forms of simple bodies, then the simple bodies of the elements will lose their definition (rationem). For an element is that of which something is primarily composed, and exists in it and is indivisible ac-.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Daniel Attala Pochon (1997). Dos escepticismos y desafío escéptico en The Advancement of Science, de Philip Kitcher (Two Skepticism and Skeptic Challenge in Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science). Theoria 12 (2):317-335.
    En este artículo me propongo analizar el punto de partida epistemológico de un reciente libro de Philip Kitcher (The Advancement of Science) a través de su discusión con las concepciónes ‘escépticas’. Podemos distinguir entre dos tipos de escepticismo en Ia trama deI libro de Kitcher: uno débil y otro radical. Intentamos difinir el tipo de realismo que Kitcher defiende, para finalmente mostrar que tal tipo de realismo es posible para Kitcher en Ia medida que no toma en cuenta el (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  19
    James Kraft (2006). Philip Quinn's Contribution to the Epistemic Challenge of Religious Diversity. Religious Studies 42 (4):453-465.
    In this essay I describe seven central characteristics of Philip Quinn's approach to the epistemic challenge of religious diversity as they surface in his responses to other contemporary approaches. In the process an assessment is given of Quinn's contribution, and continued relevance, to the contemporary discussions about this topic. The first three sections describe Quinn's confrontations with Alvin Plantinga, William Alston, and John Hick. The next section presents critical comments on Quinn's unique notion of thinning.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  16
    Hrvoj VanČik (1999). Opus Magnum: An Outline for the Philosophy of Chemistry. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 1 (3):239-254.
    This work explores the nature of chemistry as an autonomous science and philosophical consequences of generalizations of some chemical aspects. Chemistry is regarded in its distinction from physics, going back to the alchemical aim for the ultimate experiment rather than for all explaining theory. Topology, shape, valence etc. are identified as typically chemical concepts. The contribution of chemistry to the general theory of complexity is demonstrated by approach of diminishing interactions by which smaller and smaller energy increments are needed to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  11
    Michael Eades (2007). Newman's Adaptation of Bacci's The Life of St. Philip Neri. Newman Studies Journal 4 (1):38-54.
    This essay explores a relatively unknown and previously unstudied Newman work, The Life of St. Philip: Arranged for the Days of the Year, that he prepared for the use of his nascent English Oratorian community.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  8
    Daniel Attala Pochon (1997). Dos Escepticismos Y Desafío Escéptico En the Advancement of Science, de Philip Kitcher (Two Skepticism and Skeptic Challenge in Philip Kitcher's the Advancement of Science). Theoria 12 (2):317-335.
    En este artículo me propongo analizar el punto de partida epistemológico de un reciente libro de Philip Kitcher (The Advancement of Science) a través de su discusión con las concepciónes ‘escépticas’. Podemos distinguir entre dos tipos de escepticismo en Ia trama deI libro de Kitcher: uno débil y otro radical. Intentamos difinir el tipo de realismo que Kitcher defiende, para finalmente mostrar que tal tipo de realismo es posible para Kitcher en Ia medida que no toma en cuenta el (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  11
    Hrvoj Vanˇik (1999). Opus Magnum: An Outline for the Philosophy of Chemistry. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 1 (3):239-254.
    This work explores the nature of chemistry as an autonomous science and philosophical consequences of generalizations of some chemical aspects. Chemistry is regarded in its distinction from physics, going back to the alchemical aim for the ultimate experiment rather than for all explaining theory. Topology, shape, valence etc. are identified as typically chemical concepts. The contribution of chemistry to the general theory of complexity is demonstrated by approach of diminishing interactions by which smaller and smaller energy increments are needed to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Kenneth Jones (2014). Alcaeus Of Messene, Philip V And The Colossus Of Rhodes: A RE-EXAMINATION OF ANTH. PAL. 6.171. Classical Quarterly 64 (1):136-151.
    Among the poems of the Greek Anthology is one which purports to be the dedicatory inscription of the Colossus of Rhodes built to celebrate the Rhodians' successful resistance to the siege of their island by Demetrius Poliorcetes in the years 305–304 b.c. It has long been assumed by scholars that this epigram represents the authentic dedicatory inscription carved on the base of the Colossus, which was completed in the 280s and stood for some sixty years before being destroyed by an (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  8
    George Schrader (1951). Kant's Presumed Repudiation of the "Moral Argument" in the "Opus Postumum": An Examination of Adickes' Interpretation. Philosophy 26 (98):228-241.
    Until comparatively recently the complete text of the Opus Postutmum has not been available to students of the Kantian philosophy.Prior to the publication of Adickes’ commentary on this material in 1920, students of Kant were almost wholly dependent upon Reicke's incomplete and markedly inadequate edition of 1882–84. 2 Adickes’ commentary, with its abundance of quoted passages, provided an access to a great deal of material hitherto unavailable. But it was not until the publication of the Academy Edition in 1936 (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  1
    Elizabeth Brown (1980). The Ceremonial of Royal Succession in Capetian France: The Funeral of Philip VArticle Author Querybrown Ear [Google Scholar]. Speculum 55 (2):266-293.
    Few accounts of funeral ceremonies performed for the rulers of France before the early fifteenth century are now extant. The rare eyewitness reports of such rites are generally terse and abbreviated, and there survive only fragments of the fiscal accounts listing expenses for the services, which inevitably provide a wealth of detail overlooked or ignored by observers. The want of information cannot be attributed solely to the disappearance of once abundant documentary remains, for even in the early fifteenth century such (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    F. W. Walbank (1944). Alcaeus of Messene, Philip V, and Rome: A Footnote. Classical Quarterly 38 (3-4):87-.
    In the above paper I suggested that in Anth. Pal. ix. 519 and xi. 12 Philip V of Macedon was himself the Cyclops and the Centaur, and that these two identifications were not only appropriate to Philip's character , but also historically associated with the Argead dynasty. In my case for the ‘Centaur’ identification, however, I overlooked one of the most important pieces of evidence, though it had been available since 1926; and that is the meaning of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  7
    John V. A. Fine (1934). The Mother of Philip V of Macedon. Classical Quarterly 28 (02):99-.
    In 1924 W. W. Tarn published an article in which he attempted to prove that the mother of Philip V of Macedon was the Epirot princess Phthia. Previously all historians had accepted the statement of Eusebius that Philip was the son of Demetrius II and Chryseis, whom, after the death of her husband, the Macedonians gave in marriage to Antigonus Doson. Despite the cogency of Tarn's arguments, his theory has been rejected by both Beloch and Dinsmoor, who adhere (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  6
    John Buckler (1996). The Actions of Philip II in 347 and 346 B.C.: A Reply to N. G. L. Hammond. Classical Quarterly 46 (02):380-.
    Professor N. G. L. Hammond has of late published some of his thoughts on the activities of Philip II in 347 and 346 B.C. In addition he has treated aspects of Philip's earlier involvement in Thessalian, Thracian, and Phokian affairs. In the process he has in many instances disagreed with a number of current findings. Among those challenged are some of mine. Healthy scholarly debate is always desirable, and in this f spirit I should welcome an opportunity to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  6
    M. M. Markle (1974). The Strategy of Philip in 346 B.C. Classical Quarterly 24 (02):253-.
    The relatively plentiful sources for the year 346 pose several questions which have never been satisfactorily answered. Why did Philip insist on an alliance with Athens as a precondition of the peace ? Did Demosthenes simply invent the promises of Philip which he claims Aeschines reported to the Athenian assembly in Skirophorion? Why were the Athenians frightened when Philip got control of Thermopylae? They had long expected him to settle the Sacred War, and such action surely required (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  4
    T. T. B. Ryder (1976). Demosthenes and Philip's Peace of 338/7 B.C. Classical Quarterly 26 (01):85-.
    In speaking of Demosthenes' conduct in the period between his return to Athens after the peace agreement with Macedon and Philip's death Aeschines refers to only one specific incident, the attempt by Demosthenes to have himself elected What this position was has never been satisfactorily explained.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Giovanni Pietro Basile (2008). Idealismo e realismo nella ricezione neokantiana Dell ’Opus Postumum: Série 2 / Idealism and Realism in the Neokantian Reception of the Opus postumum‘. Kant E-Prints 3:103-114.
    The first interpretations of Kant’s unfinished work, the so-called Opus postumum, occur almost exclusively within German Neo-Kantianism . The central point of discussion focuses on the relationship between transcendental idealism and empirical realism in Kant’s late thought. Some Neokantians regard the final development of Kant’s philosophy as a radical form of idealism, either a fictionalism or a scientific idealism . Several interpreters attribute the theory of the so-called “double affection” to the Kant of the Opus postumum. Krause tries (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Mark Couch & Jessica Pfeifer (eds.) (2016). The Philosophy of Philip Kitcher. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The Philosophy of Philip Kitcher contains eleven chapters on the work of noted philosopher Philip Kitcher, whose work is known for its broad range and insightfulness. Topics covered include philosophy of science, philosophy of biology, philosophy of mathematics, ethics, epistemology, and philosophy of religion. Each of the chapters is followed by a reply from Kitcher himself. This first significant edited volume devoted to examining Kitcher's work is an essential reference for anyone interested in understanding this important philosopher.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Simon M. Huttegger & Kevin J. S. Zollman, Dynamic Stability and Basins of Attraction in the Sir Philip Sidney Game.
    We study the handicap principle in terms of the Sir Philip Sidney game. The handicap principle asserts that cost is required to allow for honest signalling in the face of conflicts of interest. We show that the significance of the handicap principle can be challenged from two new directions. Firstly, both the costly signalling equilibrium and certain states of no communication are stable under the replicator dynamics ; however, the latter states are more likely in cases where honest signalling (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  4
    Michael Whitby (1995). Philip the Nice Nicholas Hammond: Philip of Macedon. Pp. Xviii+235, 10 Figs, 16 Plates. London: Duckworth, 1994. Cased, £35. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (02):326-328.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  8
    Christopher Tuplin (1979). Philip George Cawkwell: Philip of Macedon. Pp. 215; 8 Maps. London: Faber & Faber, 1978. £7·50. The Classical Review 29 (02):268-270.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  4
    Leonard Chan (2006). J. Stroup Religious Studies 402.01 2 May 2006 The Truth of Opus Dei. Religious Studies 402:2.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  9
    Christopher Tuplin (1982). Philip of Macedon M. B. Hatzopoulos and L. D. Loukopoulos (Edd.): Philip of Macedon. Pp. 254; 129 Tables, Maps, and (Colour) Plates. London: Heinemann, 1981. £21. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 32 (02):239-241.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  4
    Luigi Alici (2006). Initium Omnis Operis Verbum. On the Semantics of Opus/Operari in Augustine. Quaestio 6 (1):15-35.
  47.  6
    M. Cary (1938). Philip of Macedon F. R. Wüst: Philipp II von Makedonien Und Griechenland in den Jahren 346 Bis 338. Pp. X + 189. (Münchener Historische Abhandlungen, I. Reihe, 14. Heft.) Munich: Beck, 1938. Paper, (Export Price) RM. 6. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (06):232-233.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  6
    M. Holroyd (1936). Philip of Macedon Arnaldo Momigliano: Filippo il Macedone. Saggio sulla storia greca del IV secolo a. C. Pp. xvi + 210. Florence: le Monnier, 1934. Paper, L. 30. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):32-33.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. M. Gawlina (2004). Kant, an Atheist? A Reading of 'Opus Postumum' by Eckart Forster (PhD Candidate of Peter F Strawson). Kant-Studien 95 (2):235-237.
  50. Veit-Justus Rollmann & Andree Hahmann (2011). Material World and Absolute Insistence: The First Analogy of Experience and the Draft Transition 1-14 of Opus Postumum. Kant-Studien 102 (2).
1 — 50 / 1000