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  1. Philippe Mongin, A Game-Theoretic Analysis of the Waterloo Campaign and Some Comments on the Analytic Narrative Project.
    The paper has a twofold aim. On the one hand, it provides what appears to be the first game-theoretic modeling of Napoleon’s last campaign, which ended dramatically on 18 June 1815 at Waterloo. It is specifically concerned with the decision Napoleon made on 17 June 1815 to detach part of his army against the Prussians he had defeated, though not destroyed, on 16 June at Ligny. Military historians agree that this decision was crucial but disagree about whether it was rational. (...)
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  2. Philippe Mongin, Spurious Unanimity and the Pareto Principle.
    The Pareto principle states that if the members of society express the same preference judgment between two options, this judgment is compelling for society. A building block of normative economics and social choice theory, and often borrowed by contemporary political philosophy, the principle has rarely been subjected to philosophical criticism. The paper objects to it on the ground that it indifferently applies to those cases in which the individuals agree on both their expressed preferences and their reasons for entertaining them, (...)
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  3. Philippe Mongin (2012). The Doctrinal Paradox, the Discursive Dilemma, and Logical Aggregation Theory. Theory and Decision 73 (3):315-355.
    Judgment aggregation theory, or rather, as we conceive of it here, logical aggregation theory generalizes social choice theory by having the aggregation rule bear on judgments of all kinds instead of merely preference judgments. It derives from Kornhauser and Sager’s doctrinal paradox and List and Pettit’s discursive dilemma, two problems that we distinguish emphatically here. The current theory has developed from the discursive dilemma, rather than the doctrinal paradox, and the final objective of the paper is to give the latter (...)
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  4. Philippe Mongin (2012). Une Conception Néo-Poppérienne de l'Explication En Sciences Sociales Et Ses Difficultés Internes. Dialogue 51 (3):503-515.
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  5. Franz Dietrich & Philippe Mongin (2010). The Premiss-Based Approach to Judgment Aggregation. Journal of Economic Theory 145 (2):562-582.
    We investigate judgment aggregation by assuming that some formulas of the agenda are singled out as premisses, and the Independence condition (formula-wise aggregation) holds for them, though perhaps not for others. Whether premiss-based aggregation thus de…ned is non-degenerate depends on how premisses are logically connected, both among themselves and with other formulas. We identify necessary and su¢ cient conditions for dictatorship or oligarchy on the premisses, and investigate when these results extend to the whole agenda. Our theorems recover or strengthen (...)
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  6. Philippe Mongin (2008). Factoring Out the Impossibility of Logical Aggregation. Journal of Economic Theory 141:p. 100-113.
    According to a theorem recently proved in the theory of logical aggregation, any nonconstant social judgment function that satisfies independence of irrelevant alternatives (IIA) is dictatorial. We show that the strong and not very plausible IIA condition can be replaced with a minimal independence assumption plus a Pareto-like condition. This new version of the impossibility theorem likens it to Arrow’s and arguably enhances its paradoxical value.
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  7. Philippe Mongin & C. D'aspremont, A Welfarist Version of Harsanyi's Theorem.
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  8. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly comments on (...)
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  9. Philippe Mongin (2006). Value Judgements and Value Neutrality in Economics. Economica 73 (290):257-286.
    The paper analyses economic evaluations by distinguishing evaluative statements from actual value judgments. From this basis, it compares four solutions to the value neutrality problem in economics. After rebutting the strong theses about neutrality (normative economics is illegitimate) and non-neutrality (the social sciences are value-impregnated), the paper settles the case between the weak neutrality thesis (common in welfare economics) and a novel, weak non-neutrality thesis that extends the realm of normative economics more widely than the other weak thesis does.
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  10. Jean-Yves Jaffray & Philippe Mongin (2003). Constrained Egalitarianism in a Simple Redistributive Model. Theory and Decision 54 (1):33-56.
    The paper extends a result in Dutta and Ray's (1989) theory of constrained egalitarianism initiated by relying on the concept of proportionate rather than absolute equality. We apply this framework to redistributive systems in which what the individuals get depends on what they receive or pay qua members of generally overlapping groups. We solve the constrained equalization problem for this class of models. The paper ends up comparing our solution with the alternative solution based on the Shapley value, which has (...)
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  11. Luc Lismont & Philippe Mongin (2003). Strong Completeness Theorems for Weak Logics of Common Belief. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (2):115-137.
    We show that several logics of common belief and common knowledge are not only complete, but also strongly complete, hence compact. These logics involve a weakened monotonicity axiom, and no other restriction on individual belief. The semantics is of the ordinary fixed-point type.
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  12. Luc Lismont, Philippe Mongin, Strong Completeness, Volker Halbach, Hannes Leitgeb, Philip Welch, Francis Jeffry Pelletier, Alasdair Urquhart & Synonymous Logics (2003). Philip G. Calabrese/Operating on Functions with Variable Domains 1–18 Stewart Shapiro/Mechanism, Truth, and Penrose's New Argu-Ment 19–42 Steven E. Boër/Thought-Contents and the Formal Ontology Of. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 32:667-668.
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  13. Philippe Mongin (2001). The Impartial Observer Theorem of Social Ethics. Economics and Philosophy 17 (2):147-179.
    Following a long-standing philosophical tradition, impartiality is a distinctive and determining feature of moral judgments, especially in matters of distributive justice. This broad ethical tradition was revived in welfare economics by Vickrey, and above all, Harsanyi, under the form of the so-called Impartial Observer Theorem. The paper offers an analytical reconstruction of this argument and a step-wise philosophical critique of its premisses. It eventually provides a new formal version of the theorem based on subjective probability.
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  14. Philippe Mongin (2001). The Paradox of the Bayesian Experts. In. In David Corfield & Jon Williamson (eds.), Foundations of Bayesianism. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 309--338.
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  15. Philippe Mongin (2000). Does Optimization Imply Rationality? Synthese 124 (1-2):73 - 111.
    The relations between rationality and optimization have been widely discussed in the wake of Herbert Simon's work, with the common conclusion that the rationality concept does not imply the optimization principle. The paper is partly concerned with adding evidence for this view, but its main, more challenging objective is to question the converse implication from optimization to rationality, which is accepted even by bounded rationality theorists. We discuss three topics in succession: (1) rationally defensible cyclical choices, (2) the revealed preference (...)
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  16. Philippe Mongin & Nathalie Sigot (1999). Halévy's Bentham is Bentham. Philosophy 74 (2):271-281.
    A reply to Fransisco Vergara's attack on Halévy's interpretation of Bentham in Philosophy, January, 1998. Vergara had argued that Halévy was mistaken in interpreting Bentham's principle of utility as a psychological law as well as the ethical greatest happiness principle. Mongin and Sigot show that Halévy correctly interpreted Bentham's texts and that the psychological law is necessary to Bentham's legal theory, economics and politics; they also argue that it is incorrect to confuse the principle of utility with a theory of (...)
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  17. Christopher W. Morris, John Broome & Philippe Mongin (1996). Obituary. Economics and Philosophy 12 (02):251-.
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  18. Michael O. L. Bacharach & Philippe Mongin (1994). Logic and the Epistemic Foundations of Game Theory: Special Issue. Theory and Decision 37 (1).
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  19. Michael Bacharach & Philippe Mongin (1994). Epistemic Logic and the Foundations of Game Theory. Theory and Decision 37 (1):1-6.
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  20. Luc Lismont & Philippe Mongin (1994). On the Logic of Common Belief and Common Knowledge. Theory and Decision 37 (1):75-106.
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  21. Philippe Mongin (1994). L'optimisation Est-Elle Un Critère de Rationalité Individuelle? Dialogue 33 (02):191-.
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  22. Philippe Mongin (1992). Friedman, Milton-Economics in Theory and Practice-Hirsch, A, Demarchi, N. Economics and Philosophy 8 (1):183-191.
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  23. Philippe Mongin (1992). Milton Friedman: Economics in Theory and Practice, Abraham Hirsch and Neil De Marchi. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 1990, Viii + 325 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 8 (01):183-.
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  24. Philippe Mongin (1991). Rational Choice Theory Considered as Psychology and Moral Philosophy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (1):5-37.
    This article attempts to assess Jon Elster's contribution to rational choice in Ulysses and the Sirens and Sour Grapes. After reviewing Elster's analysis of functional versus intentional explanations, the essay moves on to the crucial distinction between the thin and broad theories of rationality. The former elabo rates on the traditional economist's preference / feasible set apparatus; the latter is the more demanding theory which inquires into the rationality of beliefs and preferences. Elster's approach to the broad theory normally consists (...)
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  25. Philippe Mongin (1991). The Infinite Regress of Optimization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):229-230.
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  26. Philippe Mongin (1990). A Note on Verisimilitude and Relativization to Problems. Erkenntnis 33 (3):391 - 396.
    This note aims at critically assessing a little-noticed proposal made by Popper in the second edition ofObjective Knowledge to the effect that verisimilitude of scientific theories should be made relative to the problems they deal with. Using a simple propositional calculus formalism, it is shown that the relativized definition fails for the very same reason why Popper's original concept of verisimilitude collapsed-only if one of two theories is true can they be compared in terms of the suggested definition of versimilitude.
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  27. Philippe Mongin (1988). À la Recherche du Temps Perdu : Réponse a Mm. LaFleur, Rosenberg Et Salmon. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (4):537-549.
    A rejoinder to commentators of the paper Le réalisme des hypothèses et la "Partial Interpretation View", which was published in the same journal.
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  28. Philippe Mongin (1988). Le Réalisme Des Hypothèses Et la Partial Interpretation View. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):281-325.
    The article discusses Friedman's classic claim that economics can be based on irrealistic assumptions. It exploits Samuelson's distinction between two "F-twists" (that is, "it is an advantage for an economic theory to use irrealistic assumptions" vs "the more irrealistic the assumptions, the better the economic theory"), as well as Nagel's distinction between three philosophy-of-science construals of the basic claim. On examination, only one of Nagel's construals seems promising enough. It involves the neo-positivistic distinction between theoretical and non-theoretical ("observable") terms; so (...)
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  29. Philippe Mongin (1986). Are “All-and-Some” Statements Falsifiable After All?: The Example of Utility Theory. Economics and Philosophy 2 (02):185-.
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