Search results for 'Philosophers Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    R. N. T. Rmn & Katie L. Dann Bsc Psychology (2002). Empowerment in Nursing: The Role of Philosophical and Psychological Factors. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):234–239.
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  2.  6
    Alexander Herzberg (1929). The Psychology of Philosophers. New York, Harcourt, Brace & Company.
    Routledge is now re-issuing this prestigious series of 204 volumes originally published between 1910 and 1965.
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  3. Paul Katsafanas (2013). Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology. In John Richardson & Ken Gemes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford 727-755.
    Freud claimed that the concept of drive is "at once the most important and the most obscure element of psychological research." It is hard to think of a better proof of Freud's claim than the work of Nietzsche, which provides ample support for the idea that the drive concept is both tremendously important and terribly obscure. Although Nietzsche's accounts of agency and value everywhere appeal to drives, the concept has not been adequately explicated. I remedy this situation by providing an (...)
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  4.  10
    Lydia McGrew (1998). Psychology for Armchair Philosophers. Idealistic Studies 28 (3):145-155.
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  5.  3
    Evan Fales & Edward A. Wasserman (1992). Causal Knowledge: What Can Psychology Teach Philosophers. Journal of Mind and Behavior 13 (1):1-28.
    Theories of how organisms learn about cause-effect relations have a history dating back at least to the associationist/mechanistic hypothesis of David Hume. Some contemporary theories of causal learning are descendants of Hume's mechanistic models of conditioning, but others impute principled, rule-based reasoning. Since even primitive animals are conditionable, it is clear that there are built-in mechanical algorithms that respond to cause/effect relations. The evidence suggests that humans retain the use of such algorithms, which are surely adaptive when causal judgments must (...)
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  6.  7
    Ralph Blumenau (2004). The Psychology and Psychopathology of Philosophers. Philosophy Now 48:36-37.
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  7.  5
    S. S. L. (1927). The Story of Philosophy. The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers. By Will Durant Ph.D. (London: Ernest Benn, Ltd. 1926. Pp. Xiii + 586. Price, 25s.)Comparative Philosophy. By Paul Masson-Oursel . With an Introduction by F. G. Crookshank, M.D. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co., Ltd. 1926. Pp. 212. Price 10s. 6d. International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and Scientific Method.)Philosophy of the Recent Past. An Outline of European and American Philosophy Since 1860. By Ralph Barton Perry . (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 1926. Pp. Viii + 230. Price 10s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 2 (7):407.
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  8.  1
    John Laird (1929). The Psychology of Philosophers. By Alexander Herzberg. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., Ltd. 1929. Pp. X + 228. Price 10s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (16):575-.
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  9. Adam Leroy Jones (1899). Early American Philosophers. — Columbia University Contributions to Philosophy, Psychology and Education. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 48:220-222.
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  10. Charles H. Toll (1931). Herzberg's The Psychology of Philosophers. Journal of Philosophy 28:25.
     
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  11.  0
    Charles H. Toll (1931). The Psychology of Philosophers. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):25-26.
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  12.  4
    No Authorship Indicated (1995). Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology: Division 24: Expenditures and Adopted Budgets (1994-1996). Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 15 (2):205-205.
    Provides the expenditures and adopted budgets from the Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology Division 24 from 1994 to 1996. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  13.  27
    Maurice Kenneth Davy Schouten & Huibert Looren de Jong (eds.) (2007). The Matter of the Mind: Philosophical Essays on Psychology, Neuroscience, and Reduction. Blackwell Pub..
    The Matter of the Mind addresses and illuminates the relationship between psychology and neuroscience by focusing on the topic of reduction. Written by leading philosophers in the field Discusses recent theorizing in the mind-brain sciences and reviews and weighs the evidence in favour of reductionism against the backdrop of recent important advances within psychology and the neurosciences Collects the latest work on central topics where neuroscience is now making inroads in traditional psychological terrain, such as adaptive behaviour, (...)
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  14. Cheshire Calhoun & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (1984). What is an Emotion?: Classic Readings in Philosophical Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    This volume draws together important selections from the rich history of theories and debates about emotion. Utilizing sources from a variety of subject areas including philosophy, psychology, and biology, the editors provide an illuminating look at the "affective" side of psychology and philosophy from the perspective of the world's great thinkers. Part One features classic readings from Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Hume. Part Two, entitled "The Meeting of Philosophy and Psychology," samples the theories of thinkers such as (...)
     
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  15.  37
    Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Philosophical Psychology as a Basis for Ethics. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):297-314.
    Near the beginning of Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche writes that “psychology is once again the path to the fundamental problems” (BGE 23). This raises a number of questions. What are these “fundamental problems” that psychology helps us to answer? How exactly does psychology bear on philosophy? In this conference paper, I provide a partial answer to these questions by focusing upon the way in which psychology informs Nietzsche’s account of value. I argue that Nietzsche’s ethical (...)
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  16.  17
    Ben-Ami Scharfstein (1980). The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of Their Thought. Oxford University Press.
    The adventure I am now undertaking is an appraisal of my profession, philosophy, of my fellow professionals, the philosophers, and, finally of myself at least ...
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  17.  42
    Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained in contemporary (...)
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  18. Bryan William Van Norden (1991). Mencian Philosophic Psychology. Dissertation, Stanford University
    This dissertation is an investigation of the philosophic psychology of Mengzi , a Chinese Confucian of the 4th century B.C. As such, it is concerned with the role of desires, emotions, and practical reasoning in Mengzi's conception of self-cultivation and ethical flourishing. In chapter 1, I discuss why Mengzi is still worth studying by philosophers, certain hermeneutic issues, and the historical factors that account for some of the characteristic differences between Chinese and Western philosophy. ;In chapter 2, I (...)
     
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  19. Michael DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings together a (...)
     
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  20.  26
    William E. Lyons (1992). Intentionality and Modern Philosophical Psychology, III--The Appeal to Teleology. Philosophical Psychology 5 (3):309-326.
    This article is the sequel to 'Intentionality and Modern philosophical psychology, I. The modern reduction of intentionality,' (Philosophical Psychology, 3 (2), 1990) which examined the view of intentionality pioneered by Carnap and reaching its apotheosis in the work of Daniel Dennett. In 'Intentionality and modem philosophical psychology, II. The return to representation' (Philosophical Psychology, 4(1), 1991) I examined the approach to intentionality which can be traced back to the work of Noam Chomsky but which has been (...)
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  21.  21
    William E. Lyons (1990). Intentionality and Modern Philosophical Psychology I: The Modern Reduction of Intentionality. Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):247-69.
    In rounded terms and modem dress a theory of intentionality is a theory about how humans take in information via the senses and in the very process of taking it in understand it and, most often, make subsequent use of it in guiding human behaviour. The problem of intentionality in this century has been the problem of providing an adequate explanation of how a purely physical causal system, the brain, can both receive information and at the same time understand it, (...)
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  22.  7
    Roland G. Tharp (2007). A Perspective on Unifying Culture and Psychology: Some Philosophical and Scientific Issues. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27 (2-1):213-233.
    A perspective on unifying culture and psychology is presented. Following a brief discussion of universalist perspectives , the current lack of unification is considered. Some necessary presuppositions are proposed for a unifying perspective, which are then pursued through the concepts and texts of the philosopher John Searle, particularly his concept of Background. Culture may be seen as a pattern of Background. How Background cultural patterns arise constitutes the major question challenging any unifying perspective. An example of how the question (...)
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  23. Benjamin Rand (1912). The Classical Psychologists Selections Illustrating Psychology From Anaxagoras to Wundt. Houghton Mifflin Company.
     
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  24. Robert M. Gordon, Developing Commonsense Psychology: Experimental Data and Philosophical Data.
    Philosophers have been debating the nature of folk or commonsense psychology for three decades. We ask: What are the resources that enable us to navigate the social world, anticipating what others do, explaining what they’ve done, and perceiving them--and ourselves--as selves, subjects, persons, with beliefs, desire, perceptions, and feelings? Unlike traditional philosophy of mind, instead of directly confronting the mind-body problem and subproblems such as intentionality and qualia, we step back and look at the resources that give us (...)
     
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  25. Howard Rachlin (1994). Behavior and Mind: The Roots of Modern Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    This book attempts to synthesize two apparently contradictory views of psychology: as the science of internal mental mechanisms and as the science of complex external behavior. Most books in the psychology and philosophy of mind reject one approach while championing the other, but Rachlin argues that the two approaches are complementary rather than contradictory. Rejection of either involves disregarding vast sources of information vital to solving pressing human problems--in the areas of addiction, mental illness, education, crime, and decision-making, (...)
     
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  26.  16
    John Davenport, A Philosophical Critique of Personality-Type Theory in Psychology : Esyenck, Myers-Briggs, and Jung.
    Today, any credible philosophical attempt to discuss personhood must take some position on the proper relation between the philosophical analysis of topics like action, intention, emotion, normative and evaluate judgment, desire and mood --which are grouped together under the heading of `moral psychology'-- and the usually quite different approaches to ostensibly the same phenomena in contemporary theoretical psychology and psychoanalytic practice. The gulf between these two domains is so deep that influential work in each takes no direct account (...)
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  27. August John Hoffman (2015). Philosophical Foundations of Evolutionary Psychology. Lexington Books.
    Philosophical Foundations of Evolutionary Psychology explains how the topic of evolutionary psychology has developed from the contributions of philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, and Rene Descartes.
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  28. George Bealer, Robert Cummings, Michael DePaul, Richard Foley, Alvin Goldman, Alison Gopnik, George Graham, Gary Gutting, Tery Horgan, Tamara Horowitz, Hilary Kornblith, Joel Pust, E. Rosch, Eldar Shafir, Stephen Stitch, Ernest Sosa & Edward Wisniewkski (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings together a (...)
     
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  29. Christine M. Korsgaard (2008). The Constitution of Agency: Essays on Practical Reason and Moral Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Christine M. Korsgaard is one of today's leading moral philosophers: this volume collects ten influential papers by her on practical reason and moral psychology ...
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  30.  4
    Ludwig Wittgenstein (1980). Remarks on the Philosophy of Psychology. Basil Blackwell.
    Wittgenstein finished part 1 of the Philosophical Investigations in the spring of 1945. From 1946 to 1949 he worked on the philosophy of psychology almost without interruption. The present two-volume work comprises many of his writings over this period. Some of the remarks contained here were culled for part 2 of the Investigations ; others were set aside and appear in the collection known as Zettel . The great majority, however, although of excellent quality, have hitherto remained unpublished. This (...)
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  31.  10
    Fergus Kerr (2008). Work on Oneself: Wittgenstein's Philosophical Psychology. Institute for the Psychological Sciences Press.
    Wittgenstein's philosophical psychology -- Wittgenstein and Catholicism -- Wittgenstein, psychology, and psychoanalysis -- Wittgenstein and "other minds" skepticism.
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  32.  28
    Katarzyna Paprzycka (2002). False Consciousness of Intentional Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):271-295.
    According to explanatory individualism, every action must be explained in terms of an agent's desire. According to explanatory nonindividualism, we sometimes act on our desires, but it is also possible for us to act on others' desires without acting on desires of our own. While explanatory nonindividualism has guided the thinking of many social scientists, it is considered to be incoherent by most philosophers of mind who insist that actions must be explained ultimately in terms of some desire of (...)
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  33.  70
    Bill Wringe (2002). Is Folk Psychology a Lakatosian Research Program? Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):343-358.
    It has often been argued, by philosophers and more recently by developmental psychologists, that our common-sense conception of the mind should be regarded as a scientific theory. However, those who advance this view rarely say much about what they take a scientific theory to be. In this paper, I look at one specific proposal as to how we should interpret the theory view of folk psychology--namely, by seeing it as having a structure analogous to that of a Lakatosian (...)
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  34.  24
    George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (1988). How to Be Realistic About Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 1 (1):69-81.
    Folk psychological realism is the view that folk psychology is true and that people really do have propositional attitudes, whereas anti-realism is the view that folk psychology is false and people really do not have propositional attitudes. We argue that anti-realism is not worthy of acceptance and that realism is eminently worthy of acceptance. However, it is plainly epistemically possible to favor either of two forms of folk realism: scientific or non-scientific. We argue that non-scientific realism, while perhaps (...)
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  35.  17
    Donald E. Polkinghorne (1994). A Path of Understanding for Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):128-145.
    Proposes the path for understanding human existence developed by M. Merleau-Ponty as a replacement for the paths historically employed by psychology. Descartes established the agenda for modernistic philosophy when he proposed that the task of philosophy is to provide a foundation on which assurances of certain truth can be built. Modernist philosophers diverged, following the paths of sensation and of reason . Postmodernists argue that Descartes's agenda was misguided and that there is no foundation for certain knowledge. They (...)
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  36. Eric T. Olson (1997). The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Most philosophers writing about personal identity in recent years claim that what it takes for us to persist through time is a matter of psychology. In this groundbreaking new book, Eric Olson argues that such approaches face daunting problems, and he defends in their place a radically non-psychological account of personal identity. He defines human beings as biological organisms, and claims that no psychological relation is either sufficient or necessary for an organism to persist. Olson rejects several famous (...)
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  37.  13
    Fredrick J. Wertz (1999). Multiple Methods in Psychology: Epistemological Grounding and the Possibility of Unity. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):131-166.
    The problem of methodological pluralism in psychology is addressed. The dominant paradigm, in which experimental methods are assigned top priority and quantification is preferred over qualitative methods, is no longer tenable in light of criticisms by philosophers of science and psychologists. The emergence of a panoply of alternative methods is reviewed and the problems of constructionism, eclecticism, and fragmentation are delineated. Solutions based on an indigenous epistemological foundation for psychology are sought in Continental philosophy. The commensurability of (...)
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  38.  11
    Brent D. Slife & Jeffrey S. Reber (2009). Is There a Pervasive Implicit Bias Against Theism in Psychology? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (2):63-79.
    To address the title question, the authors first conceptualize the worldview of theism in relation to its historical counterpart in Western culture, naturalism. Many scholars view the worldview of naturalism as not only important to traditional science but also neutral to theism. This neutrality has long provided the justification for psychological science to inform and even correct theistic understandings. Still, this view of neutrality, as the authors show, stems from the presumption that these two worldviews are philosophically compatible. The authors’ (...)
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  39.  15
    Craig Steven Titus (ed.) (2009). Philosophical Psychology: Psychology, Emotions, and Freedom. Distributed by Catholic University of America Press.
    In line with her hopes, Philosophical Psychology outlines a vision that seeks to do justice to the complexity of the human person.
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  40. Adam Arico (2010). Folk Psychology, Consciousness, and Context Effects. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):371-393.
    Traditionally, the philosophical study of Folk Psychology has focused on how ordinary people (i.e., those without formal training in academic fields like Psychology, Cognitive Science, Philosophy of Mind, etc.) go about attributing mental states. Those working in this tradition have tended to focus primarily on intentional states, like beliefs and desires . Recently, though a body of work has emerged in the growing field of Experimental Philosophy that focuses on folk attributions of mental states that are not paradigmatically (...)
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  41. Michael B. Gill & Shaun Nichols (2008). Sentimentalist Pluralism: Moral Psychology and Philosophical Ethics. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):143-163.
    When making moral judgments, people are typically guided by a plurality of moral rules. These rules owe their existence to human emotions but are not simply equivalent to those emotions. And people’s moral judgments ought to be guided by a plurality of emotion-based rules. The view just stated combines three positions on moral judgment: [1] moral sentimentalism, which holds that sentiments play an essential role in moral judgment,1 [2] descriptive moral pluralism, which holds that commonsense moral judgment is guided by (...)
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  42. Jonathan M. Weinberg, Chad Gonnerman, Cameron Buckner & Joshua Alexander (2010). Are Philosophers Expert Intuiters? Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):331-355.
    Recent experimental philosophy arguments have raised trouble for philosophers' reliance on armchair intuitions. One popular line of response has been the expertise defense: philosophers are highly-trained experts, whereas the subjects in the experimental philosophy studies have generally been ordinary undergraduates, and so there's no reason to think philosophers will make the same mistakes. But this deploys a substantive empirical claim, that philosophers' training indeed inculcates sufficient protection from such mistakes. We canvass the psychological literature on expertise, (...)
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  43.  12
    Thomas Teo (2011). Radical Philosophical Critique and Critical Thinking in Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):193-199.
    Introducing the concept of tradition and its importance for critical-intellectual development, traditions of radical philosophy and psychology are presented. Emphasizing the role of Marxist and post-Marxist thought in various critical approaches, critical programs are presented as theoretical endeavors that share the critique of ideology. These approaches examine knowledge production and knowledge biases in the sciences and psychology from the perspective of social categories or in terms of power. It is suggested that critical thinking in psychology could benefit (...)
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  44. Joshua Knobe & Gabriel Mendlow (2004). The Good, the Bad and the Blameworthy: Understanding the Role of Evaluative Reasoning in Folk Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):252-258.
    People ordinarily make sense of their own behavior and that of others by invoking concepts like belief, desire, and intention. Philosophers refer to this network of concepts and related principles as 'folk psychology.' The prevailing view of folk psychology among philosophers of mind and psychologists is that it is a proto-scientific theory whose function is to explain and predict behavior.
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  45. Ludwig Wittgenstein (1988/1989). Wittgenstein's Lectures on Philosophical Psychology, 1946-47. University of Chicago Press.
    From his return to Cambridge in 1929 to his death in 1951, Ludwig Wittgenstein, who published only one work in his lifetime, influenced philosophy almost exclusively through teaching and discussion. These lecture notes, therefore, are an important record of the development of Wittgenstein's thought; they indicate the interests he maintained in his later years and signal what he considered the salient features of his thinking. Further, the notes from an enlightening addition to his posthumously published writings. P. T. Geach, A. (...)
     
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  46. Christian Miller (2003). Social Psychology and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Ethics 7 (4):365-392.
    Several philosophers have recently claimed to have discovered a new and rather significant problem with virtue ethics. According to them, virtue ethics generates certain expectations about the behavior of human beings which are subject to empirical testing. But when the relevant experimental work is done in social psychology, the results fall remarkably short of meeting those expectations. So, these philosophers think, despite its recent success, virtue ethics has far less to offer to contemporary ethical theory than might (...)
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  47.  5
    Milton P. Meux (1987). Educational Problems in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology: Some Proposed Courses of Action. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 7 (1):25-27.
    Perhaps there are some more practical courses of action which, while retaining our traditional emphasis on the nature and resolution of problems in theoretical and philosophical psychology, show some promise of increasing our educational impact on other psychologists. Our purpose here is to suggest several such courses of action which might be undertaken by interested members of our division. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  48.  1
    C. H. Whiteley (1973). Mind In Action: An Essay In Philosophical Psychology. Oxford University Press,.
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  49.  9
    William Lyons (1991). Intentionality and Modern Philosophical Psychology—II. The Return to Representation. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):83-102.
    Abstract In rounded terms and modern dress a theory of intentionality is a theory about how humans take in information via the senses and in the very process of taking it in understand it and, most often, make subsequent use of it in guiding human behaviour. The problem of intentionality in this century has been the problem of providing an adequate explanation of how a purely physical causal system, the brain, can both receive information and at the same time understand (...)
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  50.  7
    T. C. Meyering (1996). Philosophical Psychology in Historical Perspective: Review Essay of J.-C. Smith (Ed.), Historical Foundations of Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 9 (3):381 – 390.
    Historiography of science faces a preliminary question of strategy. A continuist conception of the history of science poses research problems different from those of a dynamic conception, which acknowledges that not only our theoretical knowledge but also the explananda themselves may change under the influence of new scientific insights. Whereas continuist historiography may advance our understanding of (the historical background of) current theoretical problems, dynamic historiography may also make a creative contribution to the progress of present-day research. This f act (...)
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