Search results for 'Philosophers Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

997 found
Sort by:
  1. R. N. T. Rmn & Katie L. Dann Bsc Psychology (2002). Empowerment in Nursing: The Role of Philosophical and Psychological Factors. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):234–239.score: 260.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Philosophical psychology (1992). Synopsis of 'Consciousness, Brain and the Physical World'. Philosophical Psychology 5 (2):153 – 157.score: 180.0
  3. Paul Katsafanas (2013). Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology. In John Richardson & Ken Gemes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford. 727-755.score: 94.0
    Freud claimed that the concept of drive is "at once the most important and the most obscure element of psychological research." It is hard to think of a better proof of Freud's claim than the work of Nietzsche, which provides ample support for the idea that the drive concept is both tremendously important and terribly obscure. Although Nietzsche's accounts of agency and value everywhere appeal to drives, the concept has not been adequately explicated. I remedy this situation by providing an (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ben-Ami Scharfstein (1980). The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of Their Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    The adventure I am now undertaking is an appraisal of my profession, philosophy, of my fellow professionals, the philosophers, and, finally of myself at least ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Alexander Herzberg (1929). The Psychology of Philosophers. New York, Harcourt, Brace & Company.score: 84.0
    Routledge is now re-issuing this prestigious series of 204 volumes originally published between 1910 and 1965.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.score: 72.0
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained in contemporary (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Maurice Kenneth Davy Schouten & Huibert Looren de Jong (eds.) (2007). The Matter of the Mind: Philosophical Essays on Psychology, Neuroscience, and Reduction. Blackwell Pub..score: 72.0
    The Matter of the Mind addresses and illuminates the relationship between psychology and neuroscience by focusing on the topic of reduction. Written by leading philosophers in the field Discusses recent theorizing in the mind-brain sciences and reviews and weighs the evidence in favour of reductionism against the backdrop of recent important advances within psychology and the neurosciences Collects the latest work on central topics where neuroscience is now making inroads in traditional psychological terrain, such as adaptive behaviour, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Philosophical Psychology as a Basis for Ethics. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):297-314.score: 72.0
    Near the beginning of Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche writes that “psychology is once again the path to the fundamental problems” (BGE 23). This raises a number of questions. What are these “fundamental problems” that psychology helps us to answer? How exactly does psychology bear on philosophy? In this conference paper, I provide a partial answer to these questions by focusing upon the way in which psychology informs Nietzsche’s account of value. I argue that Nietzsche’s ethical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. S. S. L. (1927). The Story of Philosophy. The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers. By Will Durant Ph.D. (London: Ernest Benn, Ltd. 1926. Pp. Xiii + 586. Price, 25s.)Comparative Philosophy. By Paul Masson-Oursel . With an Introduction by F. G. Crookshank, M.D. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co., Ltd. 1926. Pp. 212. Price 10s. 6d. International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and Scientific Method.)Philosophy of the Recent Past. An Outline of European and American Philosophy Since 1860. By Ralph Barton Perry . (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 1926. Pp. Viii + 230. Price 10s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 2 (07):407-.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ralph Blumenau (2004). The Psychology and Psychopathology of Philosophers. Philosophy Now 48:36-37.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Lydia McGrew (1998). Psychology for Armchair Philosophers. Idealistic Studies 28 (3):145-155.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. No Authorship Indicated (1995). Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology: Division 24: Expenditures and Adopted Budgets (1994-1996). Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 15 (2):205-205.score: 72.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Evan Fales & Edward A. Wasserman (1992). Causal Knowledge: What Can Psychology Teach Philosophers. Journal of Mind and Behavior 13:1-28.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John Laird (1929). The Psychology of Philosophers. By Alexander Herzberg. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., Ltd. 1929. Pp. X + 228. Price 10s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (16):575-.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Bill Wringe (2002). Is Folk Psychology a Lakatosian Research Program? Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):343-358.score: 68.0
    It has often been argued, by philosophers and more recently by developmental psychologists, that our common-sense conception of the mind should be regarded as a scientific theory. However, those who advance this view rarely say much about what they take a scientific theory to be. In this paper, I look at one specific proposal as to how we should interpret the theory view of folk psychology--namely, by seeing it as having a structure analogous to that of a Lakatosian (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. William E. Lyons (1992). Intentionality and Modern Philosophical Psychology, III--The Appeal to Teleology. Philosophical Psychology 5 (3):309-326.score: 68.0
    This article is the sequel to 'Intentionality and Modern philosophical psychology, I. The modern reduction of intentionality,' (Philosophical Psychology, 3 (2), 1990) which examined the view of intentionality pioneered by Carnap and reaching its apotheosis in the work of Daniel Dennett. In 'Intentionality and modem philosophical psychology, II. The return to representation' (Philosophical Psychology, 4(1), 1991) I examined the approach to intentionality which can be traced back to the work of Noam Chomsky but which has been (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. William E. Lyons (1990). Intentionality and Modern Philosophical Psychology I: The Modern Reduction of Intentionality. Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):247-69.score: 68.0
    In rounded terms and modem dress a theory of intentionality is a theory about how humans take in information via the senses and in the very process of taking it in understand it and, most often, make subsequent use of it in guiding human behaviour. The problem of intentionality in this century has been the problem of providing an adequate explanation of how a purely physical causal system, the brain, can both receive information and at the same time understand it, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (1988). How to Be Realistic About Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 1 (1):69-81.score: 68.0
    Folk psychological realism is the view that folk psychology is true and that people really do have propositional attitudes, whereas anti-realism is the view that folk psychology is false and people really do not have propositional attitudes. We argue that anti-realism is not worthy of acceptance and that realism is eminently worthy of acceptance. However, it is plainly epistemically possible to favor either of two forms of folk realism: scientific or non-scientific. We argue that non-scientific realism, while perhaps (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Katarzyna Paprzycka (2002). False Consciousness of Intentional Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):271-295.score: 68.0
    According to explanatory individualism, every action must be explained in terms of an agent's desire. According to explanatory nonindividualism, we sometimes act on our desires, but it is also possible for us to act on others' desires without acting on desires of our own. While explanatory nonindividualism has guided the thinking of many social scientists, it is considered to be incoherent by most philosophers of mind who insist that actions must be explained ultimately in terms of some desire of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Cheshire Calhoun & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (1984). What is an Emotion?: Classic Readings in Philosophical Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    This volume draws together important selections from the rich history of theories and debates about emotion. Utilizing sources from a variety of subject areas including philosophy, psychology, and biology, the editors provide an illuminating look at the "affective" side of psychology and philosophy from the perspective of the world's great thinkers. Part One features classic readings from Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Hume. Part Two, entitled "The Meeting of Philosophy and Psychology," samples the theories of thinkers such as (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Howard Rachlin (1994). Behavior and Mind: The Roots of Modern Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    This book attempts to synthesize two apparently contradictory views of psychology: as the science of internal mental mechanisms and as the science of complex external behavior. Most books in the psychology and philosophy of mind reject one approach while championing the other, but Rachlin argues that the two approaches are complementary rather than contradictory. Rejection of either involves disregarding vast sources of information vital to solving pressing human problems--in the areas of addiction, mental illness, education, crime, and decision-making, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Roland G. Tharp (2007). A Perspective on Unifying Culture and Psychology: Some Philosophical and Scientific Issues. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27 (2-1):213-233.score: 62.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Robert M. Gordon, Developing Commonsense Psychology: Experimental Data and Philosophical Data.score: 62.0
    Philosophers have been debating the nature of folk or commonsense psychology for three decades. We ask: What are the resources that enable us to navigate the social world, anticipating what others do, explaining what they’ve done, and perceiving them--and ourselves--as selves, subjects, persons, with beliefs, desire, perceptions, and feelings? Unlike traditional philosophy of mind, instead of directly confronting the mind-body problem and subproblems such as intentionality and qualia, we step back and look at the resources that give us (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John Davenport, A Philosophical Critique of Personality-Type Theory in Psychology : Esyenck, Myers-Briggs, and Jung.score: 60.0
    Today, any credible philosophical attempt to discuss personhood must take some position on the proper relation between the philosophical analysis of topics like action, intention, emotion, normative and evaluate judgment, desire and mood --which are grouped together under the heading of `moral psychology'-- and the usually quite different approaches to ostensibly the same phenomena in contemporary theoretical psychology and psychoanalytic practice. The gulf between these two domains is so deep that influential work in each takes no direct account (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Simon Beck (2006). These Bizarre Fictions: Thought-Experiments, Our Psychology and Our Selves. Philosophical Papers 35 (1):29-54.score: 56.0
    Philosophers have traditionally used thought-experiments in their endeavours to find a satisfactory account of the self and personal identity. Yet there are considerations from empirical psychology as well as related ones from philosophy itself that appear to completely undermine the method of thought-experiment. This paper focuses on both sets of considerations and attempts a defence of the method.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Hanne Andersen, Peter Barker & Xiang Chen (1996). Kuhn's Mature Philosophy of Science and Cognitive Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 9 (3):347 – 363.score: 56.0
    Drawing on the results of modem psychology and cognitive science we suggest that the traditional theory of concepts is no longer tenable, and that the alternative account proposed by Kuhn may now be seen to have independent empirical support quite apart from its success as part of an account of scientific change. We suggest that these mechanisms can also be understood as special cases of general cognitive structures revealed by cognitive science. Against this background, incommensurability is not an insurmountable (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Joshua Knobe & Gabriel Mendlow (2004). The Good, the Bad and the Blameworthy: Understanding the Role of Evaluative Reasoning in Folk Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):252-258.score: 56.0
    People ordinarily make sense of their own behavior and that of others by invoking concepts like belief, desire, and intention. Philosophers refer to this network of concepts and related principles as 'folk psychology.' The prevailing view of folk psychology among philosophers of mind and psychologists is that it is a proto-scientific theory whose function is to explain and predict behavior.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Christian Miller (2009). Empathy, Social Psychology, and Global Helping Traits. Philosophical Studies 142 (2):247 - 275.score: 56.0
    The central virtue at issue in recent philosophical discussions of the empirical adequacy of virtue ethics has been the virtue of compassion. Opponents of virtue ethics such as Gilbert Harman and John Doris argue that experimental results from social psychology concerning helping behavior are best explained not by appealing to so-called ‘global’ character traits like compassion, but rather by appealing to external situational forces or, at best, to highly individualized ‘local’ character traits. In response, a number of philosophers (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Thor Grünbaum (2011). Commonsense Psychology, Dual Visual Streams, and the Individuation of Action. Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):25 - 47.score: 56.0
    Psychologists and philosophers are often tempted to make general claims about the importance of certain experimental results for our commonsense notions of intentional agency, moral responsibility, and free will. It is a strong intuition that if the agent does not intentionally control her own behavior, her behavior will not be an expression of agency, she will not be morally responsible for its consequences, and she will not be acting as a free agent. It therefore seems natural that the interest (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jeremy Evans (2012). The Moral Psychology of Determinism. Philosophical Psychology 26 (5):639-661.score: 56.0
    In recent years, philosophers and psychologists have resurrected a debate at the intersection of metaphysics and moral psychology. The central question is whether we can conceive of moral agents as deterministic systems unfolding predictably and inevitably under constant laws without psychologically damaging the pro-social attitudes and moral emotions that grease the wheels of social life. These concerns are sparked by recent experiments documenting a decline in the ethical behavior of participants primed with deterministic metaphysics. But this literature has (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Patrick Clipsham (2014). Does Empirical Moral Psychology Rest on a Mistake? Philosophical Studies 170 (2):215-233.score: 56.0
    Many philosophers assume that philosophical theories about the psychological nature of moral judgment can be confirmed or disconfirmed by the kind of evidence gathered by natural and social scientists (especially experimental psychologists and neuroscientists). I argue that this assumption is mistaken. For the most part, empirical evidence can do no work in these philosophical debates, as the metaphorical heavy-lifting is done by the pre-experimental assumptions that make it possible to apply empirical data to these philosophical debates. For the purpose (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Brian L. Keeley (1998). Artificial Life for Philosophers. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):251 – 260.score: 56.0
    Artificial life (ALife) is the attempt to create artificial instances of life in a variety of media, but primarily within the digital computer. As such, the field brings together computationally-minded biologists and biologically-minded computer scientists. I argue that this new field is filled with interesting philosophical issues. However, there is a dearth of philosophers actively conducting research in this area. I discuss two books on the new field: Margaret A. Boden's The philosophy of artificial life and Christopher G. Langton's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Cara Spencer (2007). Unconscious Vision and the Platitudes of Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 20 (3):309 – 327.score: 56.0
    Since we explain behavior by ascribing intentional states to the agent, many philosophers have assumed that some guiding principle of folk psychology like [Intentional States and Actions] must be true. [Intentional States and Actions]: If A and B are different actions, then the agents performing them must differ in their intentional states at the time they are performed. Recent results in the physiology of vision present a prima facie problem for this principle. These results show that some visual (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Craig Steven Titus (ed.) (2009). Philosophical Psychology: Psychology, Emotions, and Freedom. Distributed by Catholic University of America Press.score: 56.0
    In line with her hopes, Philosophical Psychology outlines a vision that seeks to do justice to the complexity of the human person.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Fergus Kerr (2008). Work on Oneself: Wittgenstein's Philosophical Psychology. Institute for the Psychological Sciences Press.score: 56.0
    Wittgenstein's philosophical psychology -- Wittgenstein and Catholicism -- Wittgenstein, psychology, and psychoanalysis -- Wittgenstein and "other minds" skepticism.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Eric T. Olson (1997). The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Most philosophers writing about personal identity in recent years claim that what it takes for us to persist through time is a matter of psychology. In this groundbreaking new book, Eric Olson argues that such approaches face daunting problems, and he defends in their place a radically non-psychological account of personal identity. He defines human beings as biological organisms, and claims that no psychological relation is either sufficient or necessary for an organism to persist. Olson rejects several famous (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Gary Hatfield (2002). Psychology, Philosophy, and Cognitive Science: Reflections on the History and Philosophy of Experimental Psychology. Mind and Language 17 (3):207-232.score: 54.0
    This article critically examines the views that psychology ?rst came into existence as a discipline ca. 1879, that philosophy and psychology were estranged in the ensuing decades, that psychology ?nally became scienti?c through the in?uence of logical empiricism, and that it should now disappear in favor of cognitive science and neuroscience. It argues that psychology had a natural philosophical phase (from antiquity) that waxed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, that this psychology transformed into experimental (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Christine M. Korsgaard (2008). The Constitution of Agency: Essays on Practical Reason and Moral Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Christine M. Korsgaard is one of today's leading moral philosophers: this volume collects ten influential papers by her on practical reason and moral psychology ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Christian Miller (2003). Social Psychology and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Ethics 7 (4):365-392.score: 54.0
    Several philosophers have recently claimed to have discovered a new and rather significant problem with virtue ethics. According to them, virtue ethics generates certain expectations about the behavior of human beings which are subject to empirical testing. But when the relevant experimental work is done in social psychology, the results fall remarkably short of meeting those expectations. So, these philosophers think, despite its recent success, virtue ethics has far less to offer to contemporary ethical theory than might (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Alexander Klein (2007). The Rise of Empiricism: William James, Thomas Hill Green, and the Struggle Over Psychology. Dissertation, Indiana University, Bloomingtonscore: 54.0
    The concept of empiricism evokes both a historical tradition and a set of philosophical theses. The theses are usually understood to have been developed by Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. But these figures did not use the term “empiricism,” and they did not see themselves as united by a shared epistemology into one school of thought. My dissertation analyzes the debate that elevated the concept of empiricism (and of an empiricist tradition) to prominence in English-language philosophy. -/- In the 1870s and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Paul Thagard (ed.) (2007). Philosophy of Psychology and Cognitive Science. North-Holland.score: 54.0
    Psychology is the study of thinking, and cognitive science is the interdisciplinary investigation of mind and intelligence that also includes philosophy, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, linguistics, and anthropology. In these investigations, many philosophical issues arise concerning methods and central concepts. The Handbook of Philosophy of Psychology and Cognitive Science contains 16 essays by leading philosophers of science that illuminate the nature of the theories and explanations used in the investigation of minds. Topics discussed include representation, mechanisms, reduction, perception, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Carsten Held, Markus Knauff & Gottfried Vosgerau (eds.) (2006). Mental Models and the Mind: Current Developments in Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. Elsevier.score: 54.0
    "Cognitive psychology," "cognitive neuroscience," and "philosophy of mind" are names for three very different scientific fields, but they label aspects of the same scientific goal: to understand the nature of mental phenomena. Today, the three disciplines strongly overlap under the roof of the cognitive sciences. The book's purpose is to present views from the different disciplines on one of the central theories in cognitive science: the theory of mental models. Cognitive psychologists report their research on the representation and processing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Thomas Nadelhoffer, Eddy A. Nahmias & Shaun Nichols (eds.) (2010). Moral Psychology: Historical and Contemporary Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 54.0
    Moral Psychology: Historical and Contemporary Readings is the first book to bring together the most significant contemporary and historical works on the topic from both philosophy and psychology. Provides a comprehensive introduction to moral psychology, which is the study of psychological mechanisms and processes underlying ethics and morality Unique in bringing together contemporary texts by philosophers, psychologists and other cognitive scientists with foundational works from both philosophy and psychology Approaches moral psychology from an empirically (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Fritz J. McDonald (2009). Linguistics, Psychology, and the Ontology of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):291-301.score: 54.0
    Noam Chomsky’s well-known claim that linguistics is a “branch of cognitive psychology” has generated a great deal of dissent—not from linguists or psychologists, but from philosophers. Jerrold Katz, Scott Soames, Michael Devitt, and Kim Sterelny have presented a number of arguments, intended to show that this Chomskian hypothesis is incorrect. On both sides of this debate, two distinct issues are often conflated: (1) the ontological status of language and (2) the relation between psychology and linguistics. The ontological (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. José Luis Bermúdez (ed.) (2005/2006). Philosophy of Psychology: Contemporary Readings. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Philosophy of Psychology: Contemporary Readings is a comprehensive anthology that includes classic and contemporary readings from leading philosophers. Addressing in depth the major topics within philosophy of psychology, the editor has carefully selected articles under the following headings: pictures of the mind commonsense psychology representation and cognitive architecture. Articles by the following philosophers are included: Blackburn, Churchland, Clark, Cummins, Dennett, Davidson, Fodor, Kitcher, Lewis, Lycan, McDowell, McLeod, Rey, Segal, Stich. Each section includes a helpful introduction (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Robert A. Wilson (1995). Cartesian Psychology and Physical Minds: Individualism and the Sciences of the Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    This book offers the first sustained critique of individualism in psychology, a view that has been the subject of debate between philosophers such as Jerry Fodor and Tyler Burge for many years. The author approaches individualism as an issue in the philosophy of science and by discussing issues such as computationalism and the mind's modularity he opens the subject up for non-philosophers in psychology and computer science. Professor Wilson carefully examines the most influential arguments for individualism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Marko Barendregt & René Van Hezewijk (2005). Adaptive and Genomic Explanations of Human Behaviour: Might Evolutionary Psychology Contribute to Behavioural Genomics? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):57-78.score: 54.0
    . Evolutionary psychology and behavioural genomics are both approaches to explain human behaviour from a genetic point of view. Nonetheless, thus far the development of these disciplines is anything but interdependent. This paper examines the question whether evolutionary psychology can contribute to behavioural genomics. Firstly, a possible inconsistency between the two approaches is reviewed, viz. that evolutionary psychology focuses on the universal human nature and disregards the genetic variation studied by behavioural genomics. Secondly, we will discuss the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Eric Dietrich (1989). Semantics and the Computational Paradigm in Computational Psychology. Synthese 79 (April):119-41.score: 54.0
    There is a prevalent notion among cognitive scientists and philosophers of mind that computers are merely formal symbol manipulators, performing the actions they do solely on the basis of the syntactic properties of the symbols they manipulate. This view of computers has allowed some philosophers to divorce semantics from computational explanations. Semantic content, then, becomes something one adds to computational explanations to get psychological explanations. Other philosophers, such as Stephen Stich, have taken a stronger view, advocating doing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Ryan D. Tweney & Michael E. Doherty (1983). Rationality and the Psychology of Inference. Synthese 57 (November):129-138.score: 54.0
    Recent advances in the cognitive psychology of inference have been of great interest to philosophers of science. The present paper reviews one such area, namely studies based upon Wason's 4-card selection task. It is argued that interpretation of the results of the experiments is complex, because a variety of inference strategies may be used by subjects to select evidence needed to confirm or disconfirm a hypothesis. Empirical evidence suggests that which strategy is used depends in part on the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 997