Search results for 'Philosophers correspondence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Richard Grathoff (ed.) (1989). Philosophers in Exile: The Correspondence of Alfred Schutz and Aron Gurwitsch, 1939-1959. Indiana University Press.
    This book presents the remarkable correspondence between Alfred Schutz and Aron Gurwitsch, emigre philosophers influenced by Edmund Husserl, who fled Europe on the eve of World War II and ultimately became seminal figures in the establishment of phenomenology in the United States. Their deep and lasting friendship grew out of their mutual concern with the question of the connections between science and the life-world. Interwoven with philosophical exchange is the two scholars' encounter with the unfamiliar problems of American (...)
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  2. G. Giordano (1999). Report on the January 14-15, 1999 Messina Conference on the Correspondence of Italian Philosophers (1850-1950). Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 19 (3):458-462.
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  3. S. Sandrini (2004). Report on the May 10, 2003 Pisa Conference on the Correspondence of the Philosophers. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 59 (2):633-636.
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  4.  9
    Nicolaus (1994). Nicholas of Autrecourt: His Correspondence with Master Giles and Bernard of Arezzo : A Critical Edition From the Two Parisian Manuscripts with an Introduction, English Translation, Explanatory Notes, and Indexes. BRILL.
    This volume not only provides the first critical edition with an English translation of the famous correspondence of Nicholas of Autrecourt (c. 1300-1369), but also an assessment of his views and the views of those to whom the letters were ...
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  5.  3
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1921). The Nietzsche-Wagner Correspondence. Liveright.
    THE NIETZSCHE-WAGNER CORRESPONDENCE CHAPTER I. FIRST MEETING. MY brother writes in "Ecce Homo": "From the moment a piano edition of 'Tristan and Isolde* appeared (my compliments, ...
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  6. John Locke (1976). The Correspondence of John Locke. Clarendon Press.
     
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  7. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1967). The Leibniz-Arnauld Correspondence. Garland.
     
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  8.  19
    Samuel Clarke (1956). The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence: Together with Extracts From Newton's Principia and Opticks. Barnes & Noble.
    This book presents extracts from Leibniz's letters to Newtonian scientist Samuel Clarke.
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  9. Jeremy Bentham (1968). The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham. London, Athlone P..
    v. 1. 1752-76.--v. 2. 1777-80.--v. 3. January 1781 to October 1788.--v. 4. 1788-1793.--v. 5. 1794-1797.--v. 6. January 1798 to December 1801.--v. 7. January 1802 to December 1808.--v. 8. January 1809 to December 1816.--v. 9. January 1817 to June 1820.-- v. 10. July 1820 to December 1821.--v. 11. January 1822 to June 1824.--v. 12. July 1824-June 1828.
     
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  10. Maurice Blondel (1967). Pierre Teilhard De Chardin. Maurice Blondel, Correspondence. [New York]Herder and Herder.
     
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  11. Louis Claude de Saint-Martin (1949). Theosophic Correspondence Between Louis Claude De Saint-Martin (the "Unknown Philosopher") and Kirchberger, Baron De Liebistorf. Theosophical University Press.
  12. Benedictus de Spinoza (1928). The Correspondence of Spinoza. New York, Russell & Russell.
     
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  13. György Lukács (1986). Georg Lukács: Selected Correspondence, 1902-1920: Dialogues with Weber, Simmel, Buber, Mannheim, and Others. Columbia University Press.
  14. Richard Price (1983). The Correspondence of Richard Price. University of Wales Press.
    v. 1. July 1748-March 1778 -- v. 2. March 1778-February 1786 -- v. 3. February 1786-February 1791.
     
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  15.  75
    Andrew Newman (2002). The Correspondence Theory of Truth: An Essay on the Metaphysics of Predication. Cambridge University Press.
    This work presents a version of the correspondence theory of truth based on Wittgenstein's Tractatus and Russell's theory of truth and discusses related metaphysical issues such as predication, facts, and propositions. Like Russell and one prominent interpretation of the Tractatus it assumes a realist view of universals. Part of the aim is to avoid Platonic propositions, and although sympathy with facts is maintained in the early chapters, the book argues that facts as real entities are not needed. It includes (...)
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  16.  75
    John Earman (2009). Essential Self-Adjointness: Implications for Determinism and the Classical–Quantum Correspondence. Synthese 169 (1):27 - 50.
    It is argued that seemingly “merely technical” issues about the existence and uniqueness of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators in quantum mechanics have interesting implications for foundations problems in classical and quantum physics. For example, pursuing these technical issues reveals a sense in which quantum mechanics can cure some of the forms of indeterminism that crop up in classical mechanics; and at the same time it reveals the possibility of a form of indeterminism in quantum mechanics that is quite distinct (...)
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  17. Marsilio Ficino (1975). The Letters of Marsilio Ficino. Shepheard-Walwyn.
    The problems which troubled people's minds during the Italian Renaissance were much the same as today. In trying to cope with them, many deep thinking people turned to Marsilio Ficino for help. Through his letters he advised, encouraged, and occasionally reproved them. Fearlessly he expressed the truth and his wisdom influenced many of the finest Western minds. He numbered statesmen, popes, artists, scientists, and philosophers amongst his circle.
     
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  18. John (1955). Letters. New York, T. Nelson.
    A collection of letters portraying the life and times of this great medieval scholar, the devoted secretary of Archbishop Theobald, and the faithful friend and counsellor of Becket. Volume 1 of his correspondence, 'The Early Letters,' long out of print, is available on microfiche.
     
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  19. David Hume (1932). The Letters of David Hume. Garland Pub..
     
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  20. René Descartes (1970). Descartes: Philosophical Letters. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
     
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  21. David Hume (1954). New Letters of David Hume. Garland Pub..
     
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  22. Josiah Royce (1970). The Letters of Josiah Royce. Chicago,University of Chicago Press.
     
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  23. Maurice Blondel (1961). Correspondance Philosophique. Éditions Du Seuil.
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  24. Auguste Comte (1973). Correspondance Générale Et Confessions. Paris,Mouton.
     
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  25. Benedictus de Spinoza (1966). Letters to Friend and Foe. New York, Philosophical Library; [Distributed to the Trade by Book Sales, New York.
     
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  26.  8
    John (1986). The Letters of John of Salisbury: The Early Letters (1153-1161). Oxford University Press, USA.
    This unique collection of letters portrays the life and times of John of Salisbury, the devoted secretary of Archbishop Theobald, the faithful friend and ...
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  27. Francesco Morrone (ed.) (2008). Descartes Et Deslettres: "Epistolari" E Filosofia in Descartes E Nei Cartesiani. Le Monnier Università.
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  28. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1975). Briefwechsel: Krit. De Gruyter.
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  29. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1975). Briefwechsel: Krit. Gesamtausg. De Gruyter.
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  30. Bertrand Russell (1969). Dear Bertrand Russell. London, Allen & Unwin.
     
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  31. George Santyana (1955). Letters. New York, Scribner.
     
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  32. Anthony Ashley Cooper Shaftesbury (1978). The Life, Unpublished Letters, and Philosophical Regimen of Anthony, Earl of Shaftesbury. Norwood Editions.
  33. Hajime Tanabe (2004). Tanabe Hajime, Karaki Junzō Ōfuku Shokan. Chikuma Shobō.
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  34. Hans Radder (1991). Heuristics and the Generalized Correspondence Principle. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (2):195-226.
    Several philosophers of science have claimed that the correspondence principle can be generalized from quantum physics to all of (particularly physical) science and that in fact it constitutes one of the major heuristical rules for the construction of new theories. In order to evaluate these claims, first the use of the correspondence principle in (the genesis of) quantum mechanics will be examined in detail. It is concluded from this and from other examples in the history of science (...)
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  35.  55
    Robert Barnard & Joseph Ulatowski (2013). Truth, Correspondence, and Gender. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (4):621-638.
    Philosophical theorizing about truth manifests a desire to conform to the ordinary or folk notion of truth. This practice often involves attempts to accommodate some form of correspondence. We discuss this accommodation project in light of two empirical projects intended to describe the content of the ordinary conception of truth. One, due to Arne Naess, claims that the ordinary conception of truth is not correspondence. Our more recent study is consistent with Naess’ result. Our findings suggest that contextual (...)
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  36. Frank Hofmann, The Correspondence Theory of Truth.
    Ever since the works of Alfred Tarski and Frank Ramsey, two views on truth have seemed very attractive to many people. On the one hand, the correspondence theory of truth seemed to be quite promising, mostly, perhaps, for its ability to accomodate a realistic attitude towards truth. On the other hand, a minimalist conception seemed appropriate since it made things so simple and unmysterious. So even though there are many more theories of truth around - the identity theory, the (...)
     
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  37.  18
    A. Paya (1995). Philosophers Against “Truth”: The Cases of Harr and Laudan. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 9 (3):255 – 284.
    Abstract The criticisms levelled at the notion of truth by an anti?realist (Larry Laudan) and an entity?realist (Rom Harré) are critically examined. The upshot of the discussion will be that whilst neither of the two anti?truth philosophers have succeeded in establishing their cases against truth, for entity?realists to reject the notion of truth is to throw out the baby with the bath water: entity?realism without the notion of correspondence truth will degenerate into anti?realism.
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  38.  17
    Michael Wenisch (2010). The Epistemological Roots of the Dispute Over Time and Freedom in the Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence. International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):201-220.
    Historians and philosophers of science commonly ignore the epistemological disagreement about the theoretical limits of rationality that underlies the disputes over the absoluteness or relationality of time and the true nature of divine freedom in the Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence. Accordingly, I explore both the logical interconnectedness and the deeper philosophical roots of these disputes, with a view to evaluating the contrast in Leibniz’s and Clarke’s underlying notions of the limits of rationality. In tracing this contrast, I attempt to show (...)
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  39.  7
    James Child (1971). On the Theoretical Dependence of Correspondence Postulates. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):170-177.
    The nature of the connection between theory and observation has been a major source of difficulty for philosophers of science. It is most vexing for those who would reduce the terms of a theory to those of an observation language, e.g. Carnap, Braithwaite, and Nagel. Carnap's work, particularly his treatment of physical theories as partially interpreted formalisms, forms the point of focus of this paper. Carnap attempted to make the connection between theory and observation through correspondence postulates. It (...)
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  40. Richard Creath (ed.) (1991). Dear Carnap, Dear Van: The Quine-Carnap Correspondence and Related Work: Edited and with an Introduction by Richard Creath. University of California Press.
    Rudolf Carnap and W. V. Quine, two of the twentieth century's most important philosophers, corresponded at length—and over a long period of time—on matters personal, professional, and philosophical. Their friendship encompassed issues and disagreements that go to the heart of contemporary philosophic discussions. Carnap was a founder and leader of the logical positivist school. The younger Quine began as his staunch admirer but diverged from him increasingly over questions in the analysis of meaning and the justification of belief. That (...)
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  41. Elisabeth (2007). The Correspondence Between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes. University of Chicago Press.
    Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–80) and Rene; Descartes (1596–1650) exchanged fifty-eight letters—thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth. Their correspondence contains the only known extant philosophical writings by Elisabeth, revealing her mastery of metaphysics, analytic geometry, and moral philosophy, as well as her keen interest in natural philosophy. The letters are essential reading for anyone interested in Descartes’s philosophy, in particular his account of the human being as a union of mind and body, (...)
     
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  42. Marc A. Hight (ed.) (2012). The Correspondence of George Berkeley. Cambridge University Press.
    George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne, was an Irish philosopher and divine who pursued a number of grand causes, contributing to the fields of economics, mathematics, political theory and theology. He pioneered the theory of 'immaterialism', and his work ranges over many philosophical issues that remain of interest today. This volume offers a complete and accurate edition of Berkeley's extant correspondence, including letters both written by him and to him, supplemented by extensive explanatory and critical notes. Alexander Pope famously said (...)
     
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  43. Marc A. Hight (ed.) (2016). The Correspondence of George Berkeley. Cambridge University Press.
    George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne, was an Irish philosopher and divine who pursued a number of grand causes, contributing to the fields of economics, mathematics, political theory and theology. He pioneered the theory of 'immaterialism', and his work ranges over many philosophical issues that remain of interest today. This volume offers a complete and accurate edition of Berkeley's extant correspondence, including letters both written by him and to him, supplemented by extensive explanatory and critical notes. Alexander Pope famously said (...)
     
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  44. Andrew Newman (2005). The Correspondence Theory of Truth: An Essay on the Metaphysics of Predication. Cambridge University Press.
    This work presents a version of the correspondence theory of truth based on Wittgenstein's Tractatus and Russell's theory of truth and discusses related metaphysical issues such as predication, facts and propositions. Like Russell and one prominent interpretation of the Tractatus it assumes a realist view of universals. Part of the aim is to avoid Platonic propositions, and although sympathy with facts is maintained in the early chapters, the book argues that facts as real entities are not needed. It includes (...)
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  45. Andrew Newman (2009). The Correspondence Theory of Truth: An Essay on the Metaphysics of Predication. Cambridge University Press.
    This work presents a version of the correspondence theory of truth based on Wittgenstein's Tractatus and Russell's theory of truth and discusses related metaphysical issues such as predication, facts and propositions. Like Russell and one prominent interpretation of the Tractatus it assumes a realist view of universals. Part of the aim is to avoid Platonic propositions, and although sympathy with facts is maintained in the early chapters, the book argues that facts as real entities are not needed. It includes (...)
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  46. Andrew Newman (2007). The Correspondence Theory of Truth: An Essay on the Metaphysics of Predication. Cambridge University Press.
    This work presents a version of the correspondence theory of truth based on Wittgenstein's Tractatus and Russell's theory of truth and discusses related metaphysical issues such as predication, facts and propositions. Like Russell and one prominent interpretation of the Tractatus it assumes a realist view of universals. Part of the aim is to avoid Platonic propositions, and although sympathy with facts is maintained in the early chapters, the book argues that facts as real entities are not needed. It includes (...)
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  47. Freddie Rokem (2009). Philosophers and Thespians: Thinking Performance. Stanford University Press.
    The interaction between philosophy and theater or performance has recently become an important and innovative area of inquiry. _Philosophers and Thespians_ contributes to this emerging field by looking at four direct encounters between philosophers and thespians, beginning with Socrates, Agathon, and Aristophanes in Plato's _Symposium_ and ending with a discussion between Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht about a short text by Franz Kafka. Rokem also examines in detail Hamlet's complex and tragic split identity as both philosopher and thespian, as (...)
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  48. Lisa Shapiro (ed.) (2007). The Correspondence Between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes. University of Chicago Press.
    Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes exchanged fifty-eight letters—thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth. Their correspondence contains the only known extant philosophical writings by Elisabeth, revealing her mastery of metaphysics, analytic geometry, and moral philosophy, as well as her keen interest in natural philosophy. The letters are essential reading for anyone interested in Descartes’s philosophy, in particular his account of the human being as a union of mind and body, as well (...)
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  49.  85
    Panu Raatikainen, Truth, Correspondence, Models, and Tarski.
    In the early 20th century, scepticism was common among philosophers about the very meaningfulness of the notion of truth – and of the related notions of denotation, definition etc. (i.e., what Tarski called semantical concepts). Awareness was growing of the various logical paradoxes and anomalies arising from these concepts. In addition, more philosophical reasons were being given for this aversion.1 The atmosphere changed dramatically with Alfred Tarski’s path-breaking contribution. What Tarski did was to show that, assuming that the syntax (...)
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  50. Thomas Hobbes (1994). The Correspondence. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Thomas Hobbes is one of the most important figures in the history of European philosophy. Although best known for his political theory, he also wrote about theology, metaphysics, physics, optics, mathematics, psychology, and literary criticism. All of these interests are reflected in his correspondence. Some small groups of his letters have been printed in the past, but this edition is the first complete collection of his correspondence, nearly half of which has never been printed before. All the letters (...)
     
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