Search results for 'Philosophers, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

698 found
Sort by:
  1. Birgit van den Hoven (1996). Work in Ancient and Medieval Thought: Ancient Philosophers, Medieval Monks and Theologians and Their Concept of Work, Occupations and Technology. J.C. Gieben.score: 162.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Gyula Klima (2013). Three Myths of Intentionality Versus Some Medieval Philosophers. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21:359-376.score: 146.0
    After Brentano, intentionality is often characterized as “the mark of the mental”. In Brentano‟s view, intentionality “is characteristic exclusively of mental phenomena. No physical phenomenon manifests anything like it”. 2 After Meinong, it is also generally believed that intentionality, as this characteristic mental phenomenon, concerns a specific type of objects, namely, intentional objects, having intentional inexistence, as opposed to ordinary physical objects, having real existence. Thus, intentional objects are supposed to constitute a mysterious ontological realm, the dwelling place of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Myer Bernard Barr (1932/1982). Studies in Social and Legal Theories: An Historical Account of the Social, Ethical, Political, and Legal Doctrines of the Foremost Ancient and Medieval Philosophers. F.B. Rothman & Co..score: 144.0
    The author attempted to present the development of legal theories through early & medieval philosophical history.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Edward P. Mahoney (1982). Metaphysical Foundations of the Hierarchy of Being According to Some Late-Medieval and Renaissance Philosophers. In Parviz Morewedge (ed.), Philosophies of Existence, Ancient and Medieval. Fordham University Press. 165--257.score: 126.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William E. McMahon (2000). The Categories in Some Post-Medieval Spanish Philosophers. In I. Angelelli & P. Pérez-Ilzarbe (eds.), Medieval and Renaissance Logic in Spain. Olms. 355--370.score: 126.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Farewell to the Twentieth Century: Nussbaum Glossary of Philosophical Terms Selected Bibliography Index (2009). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers: Sixth and Fifth Centuries B.C.E. Thales / Anaximander / Anaximenes / Pythagoras / Xenophanes / Heraclitus / Parmenides / Zeno / Empedocles / Anaxagoras / Leucippus and Democritus 2. The Athenian Period: Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. The Sophists: Protagoras, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, Callicles and Critias / Socrates / Plato / Aristotle 3. The Hellenistic and Roman Periods: Fourth Century B.C.E Through Fourth Century C.E. Epicureanism / Stoicism / Skepticism / neoPlatonism 4. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy: Fifth Through Fifteenth Centuries Saint Augustine / the Encyclopediasts / John Scotus Eriugena / Saint Anselm / Muslim and Jewish Philosophies: Averroës, Maimonides / the Problem of Faith and Reason / the Problem of the Universals / Saint Thomas Aquinas / William of Ockham / Renaissance Philosophers 5. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Descartes. [REVIEW] In Donald Palmer (ed.), Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 122.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lucas Siorvanes (1992). Studies in Eunapius Robert J. Penella: Greek Philosophers and Sophists in the Fourth Century A.D. Studies in Eunapius of Sardis. (ARCA, Classical and Medieval Texts, Papers and Monographs, 28.) Pp. X + 165. Leeds: Francis Cairns, 1990. £20. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):38-39.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. R. S. M. Allen Sr (1991). Mary Ellen Waithe, Ed., A History of Women Philosophers, Volume II: Medieval, Renaissance and Enlightenment Women Philosophers/AD 500-1600 Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 11 (2):142-144.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Arno Borst & Supplemente zu den Sitzungsberichten (2004). Ann E. Moyer, The Philosophers' Game. Rithmomachia in Medieval and Renaissance Europe. With an Edition of Ralph Lever and William Fulke, The Most Noble, Auncient, and Learned Playe (1563).(Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization). Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2001. 205 Pp. Index. ISBN 0-472-11228-7. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 61:504-505.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert J. Deltete (2011). James Hannam , God's Philosophers: How the Medieval World Laid the Foundations of Modern Science . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (6):420-423.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. D. Grandy (2003). AE Moyer. The Philosophers' Game. Rithmomachiain Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Early Science and Medicine 8 (1):64-65.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. E. C. McCue (1932). Selections From Medieval Philosophers, 2 Vols. Modern Schoolman 9 (4):85-85.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. James A. McWilliams (1931). Selections From Medieval Philosophers. Thought 6 (1):130-134.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Tara E. Nummedal (2003). Ann E. Moyer, The Philosophers' Game: Rithmomachia in Medieval and Renaissance Europe. With an Edition of Ralph Lever and William Fulke, The Most Noble, Auncient, and Learned Playe (1563). (Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization.) Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 2001. Pp. V, 205; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $57.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (4):1348-1350.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Sarah Stroumsa (1996). Compassion for Wisdom: The Attitude of Some Medieval Arab Philosophers Towards the Codification of Philosophy. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 1 (1):39-55.score: 120.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Fernand Van Steenberghen (1992). Armand Maurer, Being and Knowing. Studies in Thomas Aquinas and Later Medieval Philosophers. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 90 (86):227-228.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Eliezer Schweid (2008). The Classic Jewish Philosophers: From Saadia Through the Renaissance. Brill.score: 102.0
    This book provides a standard reference of the major medieval Jewish philosophers, as well as an eminently readable narrative of the course of medieval Jewish ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. John Marenbon (2006). Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 96.0
    Introduction to Medieval Philosophy combines and updates the scholarship of the two highly successful volumes Early Medieval Philosophy (1983) and Late Medieval Philosoph y (1986) in a single, reliable, and comprehensive text on the history of medieval philosophy. John Marenbon discusses the main philosophers and ideas within the social and intellectual contexts of the time, and the most important concepts in medieval philosophy. Straightforward in arrangement, wide in scope, and clear in style, this is the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. George Bosworth Burch (1971). Early Medieval Philosophy. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 90.0
    John Scotus Erigena.--Anselm of Canterbury.--Peter Abelard.--Bernard of Clairvaux.--Isaac of Stella.--Bibliography (p. [129]-136).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. J. G. Dawson (1954). Philosophical Surveys, VIII: A Survey of Work on Mediaeval Philosophy, 1945-53: Part II: Mediaeval Philosophers of the Christian West. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 4 (14):60-74.score: 80.0
  21. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (ed.) (2005). Medieval Islamic Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    Philosophy in the Islamic world emerged in the ninth century and continued to flourish into the fourteenth century. It was strongly influenced by Greek thought, but Islamic philosophers also developed an original philosophical culture of their own, which had a considerable impact on the subsequent course of Western philosophy. This volume offers new translations of philosophical writings by Farabi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, and Ibn Rushd (Averroes). All of the texts presented here were very influential and invite comparison (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Phillip Cary (1999). Philosophy and Religion in the West. Teaching Co..score: 72.0
    pt. 1. lecture 1. Philosophy and religion as traditions ; lecture 2. Plato's inquiries ; lecture 3. Plato's spirituality ; lecture 4. Plato and Aristotle ; lecture 5. Plotinus ; lecture 6. The Jewish scriptures ; lecture 7. Platonist philosophy and scriptural religion ; lecture 8. The New Testament ; lecture 9. Rabbinic Judaism ; lecture 10. Church Fathers ; lecture 11. The development of Christian Platonism ; lecture 12. Jewish rationalism and mysticism (six cassettes) -- pt. 2. lecture 13. (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John Marenbon (1987). Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350): An Introduction. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 66.0
    Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350) provides an introduction to philosophy in the Latin West between 1150 and 1350. Part I describes the medieval thinker's intellectual and historical context, by examining the structure of courses in the medieval universities, the methods of teaching, the forms of written work, and the translation and availability of ancient Greek, Arab, and Jewish philosophical texts. Part II examines the nature of intellectual knowledge by explaining the arguments given by Aristotle, his antique commentators, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement and Origen (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Risto Saarinen (1994). Weakness of the Will in Medieval Thought: From Augustine to Buridan. E.J. Brill.score: 66.0
    This book sets out to examine the medieval understanding of Aristotle's famous discussion of "weakness of the will" (akrasia, incontinentia) in the seventh book of his Nicomachean Ethics. The medieval views are outlined primarily on the basis of the commentaries on Aristotle's "Ethics by Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Walter Burley, Gerald Odonis and John Buridan. An investigation of the earlier Augustinian discussion concerning reluctant actions (invitus facere) rounds out the study. The recent studies of weakness of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gyula Klima, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.) (2007). Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub..score: 66.0
    This collection of readings with extensive editorial commentary brings together key texts of the most influential philosophers of the medieval era to provide a comprehensive introduction for students of philosophy. Features the writings of Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Boethius, John Duns Scotus and other leading medieval thinkers Features several new translations of key thinkers of the medieval era, including John Buridan and Averroes Readings are accompanied by expert commentary from the editors, who are leading scholars in the field.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Timothy C. Potts (ed.) (1980). Conscience in Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robert Eisen (2004). The Book of Job in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Medieval Jewish philosophers have been studied extensively by modern scholars, but even though their philosophical thinking was often shaped by their interpretation of the Bible, relatively little attention has been paid to them as biblical interpreters. In this study, Robert Eisen breaks new ground by analyzing how six medieval Jewish philosophers approached the Book of Job. These thinkers covered are Saadiah Gaon, Moses Maimonides, Samuel ibn Tibbon, Zerahiah Hen, Gersonides, and Simon ben Zemah Duran. Eisen explores each philosopher's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Anthony Kenny (2005/2007). Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Sir Anthony Kenny here continues his fascinating account of the history of philosophy, focusing on the thousand-year-long medieval period. This is the second volume of a four-book set in which Kenny will unfold a magisterial new history of Western philosophy, the first major single-author history of philosophy to appear in decades. In this volume, Kenny takes us on a fascinating tour through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy from the founders (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Laurent Cesalli & Majolino (2014). Making Sense. On the Cluster Significatio-Intentio in Medieval and “Austrian” Philosophies. Methodos 14.score: 66.0
    “Austrian” philosophy of language is characterized, among other things, by the following two features: Problems of language are considered within the broader framework of an intentionality-based philosophy of mind—or, to put it more precisely, questions of meaning are considered as involving a quite articulated theory of intentions; several aspects of such an account are explicitly presented as inspired by or somehow already at work in the Medieval Scholastic tradition. In this study we follow the track indicated by these two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Brian Duignan (ed.) (2011). Medieval Philosophy: From 500 to 1500 Ce. Britannica Educational Pub..score: 66.0
    Presents the history of medieval philosophy and includes profiles of notable philosophers, Jewish and Arabic medieval philsophy, and the age of the schoolmen.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Simon Critchley (2008/2009). The Book of Dead Philosophers. Granta.score: 66.0
    Pre-Socratics, physiologists, sages and sophists -- Platonists, Cyrenaics, Aristotelians and cynics -- Sceptics, stoics and epicureans -- Classical Chinese philosophers -- Romans (serious and ridiculous) and neoplatonists -- The deaths of Christian saints -- Medieval philosophers: Christian, Islamic, and Judaic -- Philosophy in the Latin Middle Ages -- Renaissance, Reformation and scientific revolution -- Rationalists (material and immaterial), empiricists and religious dissenters -- Philosophes, materialists and sentimentalists -- Many Germans and some non-Germans -- The masters of suspicion and some (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Robert Eisen (2008). The Hermeneutics of Order in Medieval Jewish Philosophical Exegesis. In Charles Harry Manekin & Robert Eisen (eds.), Philosophers and the Jewish Bible. University Press of Maryland.score: 66.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    From the ninth to the fifteenth centuries Jewish thinkers living in Islamic and Christian lands philosophized about Judaism. Influenced first by Islamic theological speculation and the great philosophers of classical antiquity, and then in the late medieval period by Christian Scholasticism, Jewish philosophers and scientists reflected on the nature of language about God, the scope and limits of human understanding, the eternity or createdness of the world, prophecy and divine providence, the possibility of human freedom, and the relationship between (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Gábor Borbély (2008). Civakodó Angyalok: Bevezetés a Középköri Filozófiába. Akadémiai Kiadó.score: 60.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Eudaldo Forment Giralt (2007). Santo Tomás de Aquino. Editorial Ariel.score: 60.0
    Esta deslumbrante biografía de Santo Tomás de Aquino perfila la vida y la obra del filósofo y fraile dominico del siglo XIII, cuyo pensamiento, después de más de siete siglos, continua vigente. Eudaldo Forment, uno de los grandes especialistas en la figura de Santo Tomás, recrea sus años de formación, sus viajes, la evolución de su pensamiento filosófico, su carrera académica, los grandes hitos de su vida... El autor ha estudiado las fuentes primarias y las biografías posteriores, para ofrecer un (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Cary J. Nederman (2005). John of Salisbury. Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.score: 60.0
    Life and career -- Early life and education (1115/1120-1147) -- In the service of Canterbury (1148-1156) -- Author and administrator (1157-1161) -- The Becket dispute (1162-1170) -- Final years (1171-1180) -- Writings -- Entheticus de dogmate philosophorum -- Policraticus -- Metalogicon -- Historia pontificalis -- Miscellaneous and spurious writings.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Arland Ussher (1967). Sages and Schoolmen. [Chester Springs, Pa.]Dufour Editions.score: 60.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stephen Boulter (2011). The Medieval Origins of Conceivability Arguments. Metaphilosophy 42 (5):617-641.score: 58.0
    The central recommendation of this article is that philosophers trained in the analytic tradition ought to add the sensibilities and skills of the historian to their methodological toolkit. The value of an historical approach to strictly philosophical matters is illustrated by a case study focussing on the medieval origin of conceivability arguments and contemporary views of modality. It is shown that common metaphilosophical views about the nature of the philosophical enterprise as well as certain inference patterns found in thinkers (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Gyula Klima (2015). Intentionality, Cognition and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy. Fordham University Press.score: 54.0
    It is supposed to be common knowledge about the history of ideas that one of the few medieval philosophical contributions preserved in modern philosophical thought is the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality, their directedness toward some object. As is usually the case with such commonplaces about the history of ideas, this claim is not quite true. Medieval philosophers routinely described ordinary physical phenomena, such as reflections in mirrors or sounds in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Andrea A. Robiglio (2006). The Thinker as a Noble Man (Bene Natus) and Preliminary Remarks on the Medieval Concepts of Nobility. Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):205-247.score: 54.0
    The late medieval discussion of 'nobility' (= nobilitas, dignitas) defined in philosophical terms (as opposed to other social notions like 'aristocracy'), produced a large number of writings, many of which are still unedited. Nevertheless, modern philosophical historiography (developed throughout the seventeenth century and reaching its first apogee with Hegel) has neglected the conceptual debates on nobility. Perhaps having assumed it to be a dead relic of the 'pre-illuminist' past, historians and philosophers understood 'nobility' as a non-philosophical issue and so (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jeffrey E. Brower, Medieval Theories of Relations. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 54.0
    The purpose of this entry is to provide a systematic introduction to medieval views about the nature and ontological status of relations. Given the current state of our knowledge of medieval philosophy, especially with regard to relations, it is not possible to discuss all the nuances of even the best known medieval philosophers' views. In what follows, therefore, we shall restrict our aim to identifying and describing (a) the main types of position that were developed during the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. John Kilcullen, Medieval Theories of Natural Rights.score: 54.0
    From the 12 th century onwards, medieval canon lawyers and, from the early 14 th century, theologians and philosophers began to use ius to mean a right, and developed a theory of natural rights, the predecessor of modern theories of human rights. The main applications of this theory were in respect of property and government.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Catarina Dutilh Novaes (2006). Formalizations Après la Lettre: Studies in Medieval Logic and Semantics. Dissertation, Leiden Universityscore: 54.0
    This thesis is on the history and philosophy of logic and semantics. Logic can be described as the ‘science of reasoning’, as it deals primarily with correct patterns of reasoning. However, logic as a discipline has undergone dramatic changes in the last two centuries: while for ancient and medieval philosophers it belonged essentially to the realm of language studies, it has currently become a sub-branch of mathematics. This thesis attempts to establish a dialogue between the modern and the (...) traditions in logic, by means of ‘translations’ of the medieval logical theories into the modern framework of symbolic logic, i.e. formalizations. One of its conclusions is that, when properly understood within their own framework, the interest of medieval logical theories for modern investigations go beyond mere historical interest, but that a thorough conceptual analysis of such theories must be undertaken in order to avoid conceptual misprojections. While such translations of medieval into modern logic have been attempted before, the approach presented here is innovative in that attention is paid to the similarities as well as to the dissimilarities between the two traditions, and to what can be learned from the medieval masters for modern investigations in logic and semantics. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Adrian Walsh (2004). The Morality of the Market and the Medieval Schoolmen. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 3 (2):241-259.score: 54.0
    Recently among analytic political philosophers there has been a considerable revival of interest in the normative evaluation of the market and of economic processes more generally. While not rejecting markets in toto , philosophers such as Elizabeth Anderson and Amartya Sen have raised questions about the proper range of the market, explored the role of normative considerations in economic decision-making and raised doubts about the view that normative constraints are never legitimately placed on economic activity. In this article I experience (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Kilcullen, Week 11: Medieval Elements in Descartes.score: 54.0
    Descartes (1596-1650) is generally regarded as the first of the modern philosophers. Indeed, until about 50 years ago most philosophers would have said that Descartes was the first significant philosopher since Aristotle. Descartes himself does not draw attention to his sources--not to conceal them (that would have been pointless, because to his contemporaries the continuities of his thought with the books they had all been brought up on would have been obvious), but so as to avoid getting embroiled in learned (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Stephen Riker (1996). Al-Ghazali on Necessary Causality in The Incoherence of the Philosophers. The Monist 79 (3):315-324.score: 54.0
    Many scholars of modern philosophy link the discussion of the necessary nature of causality inexorably with the name of the David Hume. Yet, long before Hume, the issue of necessary causality had been taken up by the Medieval Islamic philosopher Al-Ghazali. The purpose of this paper will be to examine Al-Ghazali’s views concerning the necessary nature of causality in his work ’The Incoherence of the Philosophers’ with particular reference to the issue of whether there is a complete rejection of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Aladdin M. Yaqub (2010). Al-Ġazālī's Philosophers on the Divine Unity. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 20 (2):281-306.score: 54.0
    The medieval Islamic philosophers held a certain conception of the divine unity that assumes the necessary existent to be both one and simple. The oneness of the necessary existent meant that it is the only necessary existent and its simplicity meant that it admits no composition whatsoever az presents, with elaboration, an exposition of the philosophers' conception of the divine unity, several arguments for its two components (i.e., oneness and simplicity), and his critique of these arguments. In this paper (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 698