Search results for 'Philosophical Anthropology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  38
    Nicholas Rescher (1990). Human Interests: Reflections on Philosophical Anthropology. Stanford University Press.
    Philosophical anthropology is the philosophical study of the conditions of human existence and the issues that confront people in the conduct of their everyday lives. This book surveys, from a contemplative, philosophical point of view, a wide variety of human-interest issues, including happiness, luck, aging, the meaning of life, optimism and pessimism, morality, and faith and belief. The author's deliberations blend historical, theoretical, and personal perspectives into philosophical appreciation of the human condition. The philosophers of (...)
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  2.  44
    Christian Lotz (2005). From Nature to Culture? Diogenes and Philosophical Anthropology. Human Studies 28 (1):41 - 56.
    This essay is concerned with the central issue of philosophical anthropology: the relation between nature and culture. Although Rousseau was the first thinker to introduce this topic within the modern discourse of philosophy and the cultural sciences, it has its origin in Diogenes the Cynic, who was a disciple of Socrates. In my essay I (1) historically introduce a few aspects of philosophical anthropology, (2) deal with the nature–culture exchange, as introduced in Kant, then I (3) (...)
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  3.  23
    Gabriel Peters (2012). The Social as Heaven and Hell: Pierre Bourdieu's Philosophical Anthropology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):63-86.
    Many authors have argued that all studies of socially specific modalities of human action and experience depend on some form of “philosophical anthropology”, i.e. on a set of general assumptions about what human beings are like, assumptions without which the very diagnoses of the cultural and historical variability of concrete agents' practices would become impossible. Bourdieu was sensitive to that argument and, especially in the later phase of his career, attempted to make explicit how his historical-sociological investigations presupposed (...)
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  4.  11
    Sergeiy Sandler (2013). Language and Philosophical Anthropology in the Work of Mikhail Bakhtin and the Bakhtin Circle. Rivista Italiana di Filosofia Del Linguiaggio 7 (2):152-165.
    The Bakhtin Circle’s conception of language is very much still alive, still productive, in the language sciences today. My claim in this paper is that to understand the Bakhtin Circle’s continuing relevance to the language sciences, we have to look beyond the linguistic theory itself, to the philosophical groundwork laid for this project by Bakhtin in what he himself referred to as his philosophical anthropology. This philosophical anthropology, at the center of which stands an architectonics (...)
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  5.  6
    Anna Borisenkova (2012). Introduction: Philosophical Anthropology and Social Analysis. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 3 (1):1-5.
    The guest editor introduces No. 3 Vol. 1 (2012), "Philosophical Anthropology and Social Analysis." .
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  6.  4
    Predrag Krstic (2007). Philosophical Anthropology, Anthropologic of Philosophy and After. Filozofija I Društvo 18 (1):9-48.
    This expose deals, first of all, with suppositions, structure and range of human thinking that has been undertaken, very ambitiously, by "philosophical anthropology" at the beginning of the twentieth century. And then, through philosophical critique and self-critique of its status and limitations of this "discipline", it is indicating the orientation of recent controversy regarding the possibilities and characters of radical dismissal and/or reaffirmation of philosopheme "man".
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  7.  9
    Jayandra Soni (1989). Philosophical Anthropology in Śaiva Siddhānta: With Special Reference to Śivāgrayogin. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    CHAPTER Introduction Some basic questions in philosophical anthropology The question whether there is indeed a concern in Indian thought of what comes under ...
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  8.  18
    Vincent Crapanzano (2004). Imaginative Horizons: An Essay in Literary-Philosophical Anthropology. University of Chicago Press.
    How do people make sense of their experiences? How do they understand possibility? How do they limit possibility? These questions are central to all the human sciences. Here, Vincent Crapanzano offers a powerfully creative new way to think about human experience: the notion of imaginative horizons. For Crapanzano, imaginative horizons are the blurry boundaries that separate the here and now from what lies beyond, in time and space. These horizons, he argues, deeply influence both how we experience our lives and (...)
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  9.  51
    Chad Engelland (2004). Augustinian Elements in Heidegger's Philosophical Anthropology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:263-275.
    Heidegger’s 1921 lecture course, “Augustine and Neo-Platonism,” shows the emergence of certain Augustinian elements in Heidegger’s account of the human being. In Book X of Augustine’s Confessions, Heidegger finds a rich account of the historicity and facticity of human existence. He interprets Augustinian molestia (facticity) by exhibiting the complex relation of curare (the fundamental character of factical life) and the three forms of tentatio (possibilities of falling). In this analysis, molestia appears as the how of the being of life. Heidegger (...)
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  10. Joseph Agassi (1977). Towards a Rational Philosophical Anthropology. M. Nijhoff.
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  11. Sami Pihlström (1998). Pragmatism and Philosophical Anthropology Understanding Our Human Life in a Human World.
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  12. Michael Landmann (1974). Philosophical Anthropology. Philadelphia,Westminster Press.
     
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  13.  2
    Pini Ifergan (2015). Hans Blumenberg’s Philosophical Project: Metaphorology as Anthropology. Continental Philosophy Review 48 (3):359-377.
    Philosophical anthropology emerges, partly at least, by dissatisfied and critical followers of Husserl’s phenomenology, such as Max Scheler and the young Martin Heidegger. They were dissatisfied with what they saw as a disregard of the concrete human being as an essential part of phenomenological analysis. They tried instead to claim that philosophy must search for, and anchor, its foundations exclusively in the human being, not as an abstract entity, but as an existential, concrete, physical being. In this specific (...)
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  14.  9
    Mary Maxwell (1984). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Anthropology. Columbia University Press.
    ... Nosce te ipsum -Carolus Linnaeus We, however, want to become those we are — human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give themselves laws, ...
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  15.  6
    Vallori Rasini (2010). Hans Jonas and the Philosophical Anthropology. Rivista di Filosofia 101 (2):269-284.
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  16. David J. Levy (1987). Political Order Philosophical Anthropology, Modernity, and the Challenge of Ideology.
     
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  17. J. F. Donceel (1967). Philosophical Anthropology. New York, Sheed and Ward.
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  18.  1
    F. S. C. Northrop (1960). Philosophical Anthropology and Practical Politics. New York, Macmillan.
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  19.  1
    José Luis Rodríguez Molinero (1995). Ortega y la antropología filosófica / Ortega and Philosophical Anthropology. Naturaleza y Gracia: Revista Cuatrimestral de Ciencias Eclesiásticas 1:129-186.
  20. Tirthanath Bandyopadhyay (1988). Man: An Essay in Philosophical Anthropology. Papyrus.
     
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  21. Luigi Bogliolo (1984). Philosophical Anthropology: A Complete Course in Scholastic Philosophy. Firma Klm.
     
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  22. Douglas Browning (1964). Act and Agent an Essay in Philosophical Anthropology. University of Miami Press.
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  23.  25
    Joseph Margolis (2009). The Arts and the Definition of the Human: Toward a Philosophical Anthropology. Stanford University Press.
    The definition of the human -- Perceiving paintings as paintings I -- Perceiving paintings as paintings II -- "One and only one correct interpretation" -- Toward a phenomenology of painting and literature -- "Seeing-in," "make-believe," transfiguration" : the perception of pictorial representation -- Beauty and truth and the passing of transcendental philosophy.
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  24. Battista Mondin (1985/1991). Philosophical Anthropology: Man: An Impossible Project? Published for Pontificia Universitas Urbaniana by Theological Publications in India, Rome.
     
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  25. Zahida Hamid[from old catalog] Pasha (1948). Philosophical Anthropology of the Koran. Washington.
     
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  26. David M. Rasmussen (1971). Mythic-Symbolic Language and Philosophical Anthropology a Constructive Interpretation of the Thought of Paul Ricœr. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  27. Rabindra Ray (2010). In the European Shadow: Further Essays in a Philosophical Anthropology. Yash Publications.
     
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  28. Rabindra Ray (2005). Living with Difference: Essays in a Philosophical Anthropology. Yash Publications.
     
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  29. Victor Segesvary (1999). Existence and Transcendence: An Anti-Faustian Study in Philosophical Anthropology. International Scholars Publications.
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  30.  1
    Phillip Honenberger (2015). Animality, Sociality, and Historicity in Helmuth Plessner’s Philosophical Anthropology. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (5):707-729.
    Axel Honneth and Hans Joas claim that Helmuth Plessner’s philosophical anthropology is problematically ‘solipsistic’ insofar as it fails to appreciate the ways in which human persons or selves are brought into being and given their characteristic powers of reflection and action by social processes. Here I review the main argument of Plessner’s Die Stufen des Organischen und der Mensch: Einleitung in die philosophische Anthropologie with this criticism in mind, giving special attention to Plessner’s accounts of organic being, personhood, (...)
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  31.  38
    Hans-Peter Kr (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107 – 119.
    John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder needs a therapeutic (...)
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  32.  26
    Hans-Peter Krüger (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107-119.
    Abstract John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder needs a (...)
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  33. Craig Reeves (2013). Freedom, Dialectic and Philosophical Anthropology. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):13-44.
    In this article I present an original interpretation of Roy Bhaskar’s project in Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom. His major move is to separate an ontological dialectic from a critical dialectic, which in Hegel are laminated together. The ontological dialectic, which in Hegel is the self-unfolding of spirit, becomes a realist and relational philosophical anthropology. The critical dialectic, which in Hegel is confined to retracing the steps of spirit, now becomes an active force, dialectical critique, which interposes into (...)
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  34. Woei Lien Chong (1999). Combining Marx with Kant: The Philosophical Anthropology of Li Zehou. Philosophy East and West 49 (2):120-149.
    Li Zehou is known as the "intellectual leader of the Chinese Enlightenment" of the 1980s. His major quest has always been for a way to define the role of human agency versus determinism on the one hand, and voluntarism on the other. In the 1980s, Li came forward with a philosophical anthropology (his "theory of subjectivity" or "practice") that moves between two poles: On the one hand, mankind is different from the animals because of its capacity to mold (...)
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  35. Vida Pavesich (2008). Hans Blumenberg's Philosophical Anthropology: After Heidegger and Cassirer. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 421-448.
    In this paper, I situate Hans Blumenberg historically and conceptually in relation to a subtheme in the famous debate between Martin Heidegger and Ernst Cassirer at Davos, Switzerland in 1929. The subtheme concerns Heidegger’s and Cassirer’s divergent attitudes toward philosophical anthropology as it relates to the starting points and goals of philosophy. I then reconstruct Blumenberg’s anthropology, which involves reconceptualizing Cassirer’s philosophy of symbolic forms in relation to Heidegger’s objections to the philosophical anthropology of his (...)
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  36.  14
    Joachim Fischer (2009). Exploring the Core Identity of Philosophical Anthropology Through the Works of Max Scheler, Helmuth Plessner, and Arnold Gehlen. Iris 1 (1):153-170.
    Philosophical Anthropology,” which is reconstructed here, does not deal with anthropology as a philosophical subdiscipline but rather as a particular philosophical approach within twentieth-century German philosophy, connected with thinkers such as Max Scheler, Helmuth Plessner and Arnold Gehlen. This paper attempts a more precise description of the core identity of Philosophical Anthropology as a paradigm, observes the differences between the authors within the paradigm, and differentiates the paradigm as a whole from other twentieth-century (...)
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  37.  3
    Keith R. Peterson (2010). All That We Are: Philosophical Anthropology and Ecophilosophy. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 6 (1):91-113.
    Ecophilosophers have long argued that addressing the environmental crisis not only demands reassessing the ethical aspects of human and nature relations, but also prevailing theories of human nature. Philosophical anthropology has historically taken this as its calling, and its resources may be profitably utilized in the context of ecophilosophy. Distinguishing between conservative and emancipatory naturalism leads to a critical discussion of the Cartesian culture/nature dualism. Marjorie Grene is discussed as a resource in the tradition of philosophical (...) which enables us to avoid dualistic thinking and espouse an emancipatory naturalism by resisting reductionism and acknowledging the diffuse dependence of human being on natural processes. In order to fully explicate the conditions of human dependence upon nature it becomes necessary to define an appropriate approach to ontology. This critical ontology facilitates a stratified understanding of the place of humans in nature without lapsing into reductivism or post-Kantian constructivism. It provides a sounder basis than either alternative for motivating a many- sided ecophilosophical perspective on human being. (shrink)
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  38.  29
    Georgia Apostolopoulou (2008). The Priority of Philosophical Anthropology Towards Ethics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:9-15.
    Philosophical anthropology, as Helmuth Plessner has explored it, vindicates its relative priority towards ethics, because it can set out the anthropological prerequisites for considering the moral subject as the embodied person. This claim, however, is still an open question. Walter Schulz has argued that the prevalence of science in contemporary life brings ethics to the fore and forces philosophical anthropology to an auxiliary exploration of ‘leading figures of thehuman’. Jürgen Habermas endorses Plessner’s exploration of the issue (...)
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  39.  16
    Ivan Kolev (2008). Modal Thinking in the Philosophical Anthropology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:129-136.
    If we take a bird’s-eye view of the history of philosophical ideas and try to assess the place the problems of modality hold in it, it is likely that we will gain the impression that they are not among the priorities of philosophical thinking of the essence of human being. A closer look at some classical theses, however, can provide us with different answers. In § 76 of Critique of Judgement, which is actually “just” a comment on the (...)
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  40.  43
    P. S. Gurevich (2000). Philosophical Anthropology. Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (3):19-34.
    The concept of philosophical anthropology is polysemous. These words carry the most diverse and sometimes mutually incompatible nuances of metaphysical thought. It is difficult to judge what criterion would enable us to draw the necessary demarcations. For example, the early writings of the French moralists, in which they discussed human nature, are considered to belong to philosophical anthropology. However, few would classify Arthur Schopenhauer's Aphorisms of Everyday Wisdom [Aphorismen zur Lebensweisheit] as metaphysical literature, although they contain (...)
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  41.  15
    Andrew Oldenquist (1990). The Origins of Morality: An Essay in Philosophical Anthropology. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (1):121.
    By what steps, historically, did morality emerge? Our remote ancestors evolved into social animals. Sociality requires, among other things, restraints on disruptive sexual, hostile, aggressive, vengeful, and acquisitive behavior. Since we are innately social and not social by convention, we can assume the biological evolution of the emotional equipment – numerous predispositions to want, fear, feel anxious or secure – required for social living, just as we can assume cultural evolution of various means to control antisocial behavior and reinforce the (...)
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  42.  9
    Alec Gordon (2008). Area Studies, Planetary Thinking, and Philosophical Anthropology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:95-100.
    The aim of this paper is to consider the vicissitudes of “area studies” from the Second World War to the present focusing eventually on the normative imperative to develop a new paradigm of “planetary thinking.” First an overview of the history of “area studies” will be given from the start in the U.S. during the Second World War in response to the geostrategic imperative for America to know its new geopolitical responsibilities in a world divided by war. This security imperative (...)
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  43.  8
    Herman de Dijn (2003). Hume's Nonreductionist Philosophical Anthropology. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):587-603.
    Hume's *A Treatise of Human Nature* constitutes a philosophical anthropology quite different from a philosophy of (self-)consciousness or of the subject. According to Hume, the Self or Subject is itself a product of human nature, that is, of the workings of a structured set of principles which explains all typically human phenomena. On the same basis, Hume discusses all "moral" subjects, such as science, morality and politics (including economics), art and religion as well as the different reflections about (...)
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  44. David J. Levy (1993). The Measure of Man Incursions in Philosophical and Political Anthropology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  45.  20
    A. K. Fernandes (2001). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide, and the Philosophical Anthropology of Karol Wojtyla. Christian Bioethics 7 (3):379-402.
    The lack of consensus in American society regarding the permissibility of assisted suicide and euthanasia is due in large part to a failure to address the nature of the human person involved in the ethical act itself. For Karol Wojtyla, philosopher and Pope, ethical action finds meaning only in an authentic understanding of the person; but it is through acting (actus humanus) alone that the human person reveals himself. Knowing what the person ought to be cannot be divorced from what (...)
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  46.  8
    Karl-Siegbert Rehberg (2009). Philosophical Anthropology From the End of World War I to the 1940s and in a Current Perspective. Iris 1 (1):131-152.
    The first part of the article discusses the conditions under which the “school” of thought known as “philosophical anthropology” arose and the relevance today of the problems it posed, concluding with a look at the recent prevalence taken by biological research. The second part examines the conceptions advanced by its leading figures, Max Scheler, Helmuth Plessner and Arnold Gehlen, and shows how each of them contributed to a “sociologization of anthropological knowledge.” On the basis of this analysis, (...) anthropology proves itself capable of making a significant contribution to an interdisciplinary understanding of the conditions of human life and to reflection on the foundations of sociological research and social theory. (shrink)
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  47.  23
    Amy R. McCready (1999). The Limits of Logic: A Critique of Sandel's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (4):81-102.
    Criticizing liberal conceptions such as the autonomous subject and calling for self-interpreting selves, Michael Sandel's first book, Liberalism and the Limits of Justice seems to oppose liberal theory. Methodologically, however, it follows rather than challenges its liberal predecessors: Sandel arrives at his philosophical anthropology through abstraction and deduction. This type of inquiry is not only comparable with that of liberal theory, but also incompatible with self-interpretation as Sandel defines it. The content of his argument undermines its form. It (...)
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  48.  16
    Fred R. Dallmayr (1974). Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Inquiry 17 (1-4):49 – 77.
    Philosophical anthropology is a broad-gauged study of man drawing on the findings of empirical sciences and the humanities. The paper is intended as a tribute to one of the pioneers in this field. The first part outlines central features of Plessner's conception, focusing on man's instinctual deficiency and his 'eccentric position' in the world; man from this perspective is an 'embodied' creature in the dual sense of experiencing the world through his bodily organs and of 'having' a body (...)
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  49.  4
    Gunter Gebauer & Christoph Wulf (2009). After the “Death of Man”: From Philosophical Anthropology to Historical Anthropology. Iris 1 (1):171-186.
    The first part of the article (§§ 1-3) illustrates the critical relation the authors establish with the leading figures of philosophical anthropology in terms of their engagement with “world-openness” (Weltoffenheit). This notion cannot be reduced to the objectivity that confronts man as a spiritual being, as in Max Scheler, but rather makes it possible to grasp the limits of distancing objectification; in Arnold Gehlen, the coercion to action derived from the indeterminacy of man’s relation with the world is (...)
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  50.  4
    Andrea Borsari (2009). Notes on “Philosophical Anthropology” in Germany. An Introduction. Iris 1 (1):113-129.
    The article opens (§ 1) with the paradoxical situation of philosophical anthropology between a heralded destiny of decadence (W. Schulz) and the surge of its argumentations and notions in the present-day debate on ethical themes and on the very idea of “human nature,” as well as in the redefinition of social philosophy (J. Habermas and P. Sloterdijk). It seeks, then (§§ 2-5), to trace a sort of “metaphilosophy” of philosophical anthropology, discussing the principal interpretations (H. Schnädelbach, (...)
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