Search results for 'Philosophical Methodology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Symons (2008). Intuition and Philosophical Methodology. Axiomathes 18 (1):67-89.score: 162.0
    Intuition serves a variety of roles in contemporary philosophy. This paper provides a historical discussion of the revival of intuition in the 1970s, untangling some of the ways that intuition has been used and offering some suggestions concerning its proper place in philosophical investigation. Contrary to some interpretations of the results of experimental philosophy, it is argued that generalized skepticism with respect to intuition is unwarranted. Intuition can continue to play an important role as part of a methodologically conservative (...)
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  2. Jack Reynolds (2010). Common Sense and Philosophical Methodology: Some Metaphilosophical Reflections on Analytic Philosophy and Deleuze. Philosophical Forum 41 (3):231-258.score: 120.0
    On the question of precisely what role common sense (or related datum like folk psychology, trust in pre-theoretic/intuitive judgments, etc.) should have in reigning in the possible excesses of our philosophical methods, the so-called ‘continental’ answer to this question, for the vast majority, would be “as little as possible”, whereas the analytic answer for the vast majority would be “a reasonably central one”. While this difference at the level of both rhetoric and meta-philosophy is sometimes – perhaps often – (...)
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  3. Daniele Sgaravatti, Down to Earth Philosophy: An Anti-Exceptionalist Essay on Thought Experiments and Philosophical Methodology.score: 120.0
    In the first part of the dissertation, chapters 1 to 3, I criticize several views which tend to set philosophy apart from other cognitive achievements. I argue against the popular views that 1) Intuitions, as a sui generis mental state, are involved crucially in philosophical methodology 2) Philosophy requires engagement in conceptual analysis, understood as the activity of considering thought experiments with the aim to throw light on the nature of our concepts, and 3) Much philosophical knowledge (...)
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  4. Matthew C. Haug (ed.) (2013). Philosophical Methodology: The Armchair or the Laboratory? Routledge.score: 120.0
    What methodology should philosophers follow? Should they rely on methods that can be conducted from the armchair? Or should they leave the armchair and turn to the methods of the natural sciences, such as experiments in the laboratory? Or is this opposition itself a false one? Arguments about philosophical methodology are raging in the wake of a number of often conflicting currents, such as the growth of experimental philosophy, the resurgence of interest in metaphysical questions, and the (...)
     
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  5. Margaret A. Simons (2003). Bergson's Influence on Beauvoir's Philosophical Methodology. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. 107-128.score: 120.0
    The topic of this chapter, the early philosophical influence of Henri Bergson (1859-1941) on Simone de Beauvoir, may surprise those who remember Beauvoir’s reference to Bergson in her Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter where she denies Bergson’s importance. She writes there of her interests in 1926: “I preferred literature to philosophy, and I would not have been at all pleased if someone had prophesized that I would become a kind of Bergson; I didn’t want to speak with that abstract (...)
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  6. Steffen Ducheyne (2010). Whewell's Tidal Researches: Scientific Practice and Philosophical Methodology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):26-40.score: 114.0
    Primarily between 1833 and 1840, Whewell attempted to accomplish what natural philosophers and scientists since at least Galileo had failed to do: to provide a systematic and broad-ranged study of the tides and to attempt to establish a general scientific theory of tidal phenomena. In the essay at hand, I document the close interaction between Whewell’s philosophy of science (especially his methodological views) and his scientific practice as a tidologist. I claim that the intertwinement between Whewell’s methodology and his (...)
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  7. Christopher B. Gray (2010). The Methodology of Maurice Hauriou: Legal, Sociological, Philosophical. Rodopi.score: 114.0
    Maurice Hauriou (1856-1929) -- Methodology -- Hauriou's general methodology -- Legal methodology -- Sociological methodolgy -- Methodological interplay of law and social science -- Application of methodology to large groups -- Philosophical methodology -- The philosophical status of Hauriou's methodology.
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  8. Nicholas Rescher (2001). Philosophical Reasoning: A Study in the Methodology of Philosophizing. Blackwell Publishers.score: 108.0
    This book is a study in the methodology of philosophical inquiry.
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  9. Magdalena Balcerak Jackson & Brendan Balcerak Jackson (2012). Understanding and Philosophical Methodology. Philosophical Studies 161 (2):185-205.score: 102.0
    According to Conceptualism, philosophy is an independent discipline that can be pursued from the armchair because philosophy seeks truths that can be discovered purely on the basis of our understanding of expressions and the concepts they express. In his recent book, The Philosophy of Philosophy, Timothy Williamson argues that while philosophy can indeed be pursued from the armchair, we should reject any form of Conceptualism. In this paper, we show that Williamson’s arguments against Conceptualism are not successful, and we sketch (...)
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  10. Tamar Gendler (2010). Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. Oxford University Press.score: 102.0
    In this volume, Tamar Gendler draws together fourteen essays that together illuminate this topic. Three intertwined themes connect the essays.
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  11. Anand J. Vaidya (2010). Philosophical Methodology: The Current Debate. Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):391-417.score: 102.0
    In this paper I investigate current issues in the methodology of philosophy. In particular, the epistemology of intuition and the status of empirical work on the use of intuition in philosophy.
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  12. Janet Levin (2013). Armchair Methodology and Epistemological Naturalism. Synthese 190 (18):4117-4136.score: 102.0
    In traditional armchair methodology, philosophers attempt to challenge a thesis of the form ‘F iff G’ or ‘F only if G’ by describing a scenario that elicits the intuition that what has been described is an F that isn’t G. If they succeed, then the judgment that there is, or could be, an F that is not G counts as good prima facie evidence against the target thesis. Moreover, if these intuitions remain compelling after further (good faith) reflection, then (...)
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  13. David J. Chalmers (2011). Verbal Disputes. Philosophical Review 120 (4):515-566.score: 96.0
    The philosophical interest of verbal disputes is twofold. First, they play a key role in philosophical method. Many philosophical disagreements are at least partly verbal, and almost every philosophical dispute has been diagnosed as verbal at some point. Here we can see the diagnosis of verbal disputes as a tool for philosophical progress. Second, they are interesting as a subject matter for first-order philosophy. Reflection on the existence and nature of verbal disputes can reveal something (...)
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  14. Tyler Doggett (2011). Review of Tamar Szabo Gendler's Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 96.0
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  15. Bernard Molyneux (2014). New Arguments That Philosophers Don't Treat Intuitions as Evidence. Metaphilosophy 45 (3):441-461.score: 96.0
    According to orthodox views of philosophical methodology, when philosophers appeal to intuitions, they treat them as evidence for their contents. Call this “descriptive evidentialism.” Descriptive evidentialism is assumed both by those who defend the epistemic status of intuitions and by those, including many experimental philosophers, who criticize it. This article shows, however, that the idea that philosophers treat intuitions as evidence struggles to account for the way philosophers treat intuitions in a variety of philosophical contexts. In particular, (...)
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  16. Tyler Doggett (2011). Review of Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (6).score: 96.0
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  17. Abraham Rudnick (2012). A Philosophical Analysis of the General Methodology of Qualitative Research: A Critical Rationalist Perspective. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-10.score: 96.0
    Philosophical discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research, such as that used in some health research, has been inductivist or relativist to date, ignoring critical rationalism as a philosophical approach with which to discuss the general methodology of qualitative research. This paper presents a discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research from a critical rationalist perspective (inspired by Popper), using as an example mental health research. The widespread endorsement of induction in qualitative research (...)
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  18. Susan Sherwin (1988). Philosophical Methodology and Feminist Methodology: Are They Compatible. In Christine Overall, Sheila Mullett & Lorraine Code (eds.), Feminist Perspectives: Philosophical Essays on Method and Morals. University of Toronto Press. 13--28.score: 96.0
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  19. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Three Dogmas of Metaphysical Methodology. In Matthew Haug (ed.), New Essays on Philosophical Methodology. Routledge.score: 90.0
    In what does philosophical progress consist? 'Vertical' progress corresponds to development within a specific paradigm/framework for theorizing (of the sort associated, revolutions aside, with science); 'horizontal' progress corresponds to the identification and cultivation of diverse paradigms (of the sort associated, conservativism aside, with art and pure mathematics). Philosophical progress seems to involve both horizontal and vertical dimensions, in a way that is somewhat puzzling: philosophers work in a number of competing frameworks (like artists or mathematicians), while typically maintaining (...)
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  20. Hamid Seyedsayamdost (forthcoming). On Gender and Philosophical Intuition: Failure of Replication and Other Negative Results. Philosophical Psychology.score: 90.0
    On gender and philosophical intuition: Failure of replication and other negative results. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2014.893288.
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  21. Susanna Rinard (2013). Why Philosophy Can Overturn Common Sense. In Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology Volume 4. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    In part one I present a positive argument for the claim that philosophical argument can rationally overturn common sense. It is widely agreed that science can overturn common sense. But every scientific argument, I argue, relies on philosophical assumptions. If the scientific argument succeeds, then its philosophical assumptions must be more worthy of belief than the common sense proposition under attack. But this means there could be a philosophical argument against common sense, each of whose premises (...)
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  22. Elijah Chudnoff, Where Are The Intuitions?score: 90.0
    These are comments on Jennifer Nagel's paper "Distinctively Intuitive Judgments" delivered at the Central APA 2014. In opposition to Williamson, Cappelen, and various experimental philosophers, Jennifer Nagel and I agree on the following (1) Intuitive judgments form a distinct natural kind, (2) Intuitive judgments play a role in philosophical methodology, and (3) This philosophical methodology is OK. In this paper I explore the contrast between: (4) Starting Points: if intuitive judgments play a role in OK (...) methodology then it is as starting points of philosophical reasoning, and (5) Ending Points: some intuitive judgments play a role in OK philosophical methodology as ending points of philosophical reasoning. I make a case for the historical importance of (5) and suggest we ought to prefer a conception of intuitive judgment that makes sense of how (5) might be true. (shrink)
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  23. Peter Kung (2012). Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):806-809.score: 90.0
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  24. Kathryn J. Norlock (2012). Gender Perception as a Habit of Moral Perception: Implications for Philosophical Methodology and Introductory Curriculum. Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):347-362.score: 90.0
  25. Keqian Xu (2012). A Synthetic Comprehension of the Way of Zhong in Early Confucian Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (3):422-438.score: 90.0
    Zhong 中 is a very important philosophical concept in early Confucianism. Both the received ancient Confucian classics and the newly discovered ancient bamboo manuscripts tell us that adhering to the principle of zhong was an important charge that had been transmitted and inherited by early ancient Chinese political leaders from generation to generation. Confucius and his followers adopted the concept of zhong and further developed it into a sophisticated doctrine, which is usually called zhongdao 中道 (the Way of zhong) (...)
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  26. Kuang-Ming Wu (1988). Goblet Words, Dwelling Words, Opalescent Words ‐ Philosophical Methodology of Chuang Tzu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (1):1-8.score: 90.0
  27. Soraj Hongladarom (2013). Tamar Szabó Gendler: Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (4):509-513.score: 90.0
  28. James F. Ross (1970). Aquinas and Philosophical Methodology. Metaphilosophy 1 (4):300–317.score: 90.0
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  29. Daniel Cohnitz, Sören Häggqvist, Kristoffer Ahlstrom, Joshua Earlenbough, Bernard Molyneaux, Mark Fedyk, Jussi Haukioja, Jonathan Ichikawa & Sebastian Lutz (2009). The Role of Intuitions in Philosophical Methodology. Studia Philosophica Estonica 2.score: 90.0
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  30. James McBain (2012). Issue Introduction. Essays in Philosophy 13 (1):1-5.score: 90.0
    Introduction to a volume on Philosophical Methodology. Edited by James McBain.
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  31. Margaret A. Simons (2006). Beauvoir's Early Philosophy: 1926-27. In Simone de Beauvoir, Barbara Klaw, Margaret A. Simons & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.), Diary of a Philosophy Student, Volume 1: 1926-27. University of Illinois Press. 29-50.score: 90.0
    For philosophers familiar with the traditional interpretation of Simone de Beauvoir as a literary writer and philosophical follower of Jean-Paul Sartre, Beauvoir’s 1926-27 student diary is a revelation. Inviting an exploration of Beauvoir’s early philosophy foreclosed by the traditional interpretation, the student diary reveals Beauvoir’s early dedication to becoming a philosopher and her early formulation of philosophical problems and positions usually attributed to Sartre’s influence, such as the central problem of “the opposition of self and other,” years before (...)
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  32. Clarence Shole Johnson (1998). Paulin Hountondji, Africian Philosophy, and Philosophical Methodology. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):179-195.score: 90.0
    This paper examines Paulin Hountondji's endeavor both to explode what he terms the myth about African philosophy and to elaborate what he deems the reality of African philosophy. Hountondji argues that it is a myth that African philosophy consists in the beliefs collectively held by various ethnic groups. Yet it is this myth that has gained currency in Western circles. Hountondji believes that this myth has been given currency largely by Western ethnographers and ethnophilosophers bent on promoting the idea that (...)
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  33. Mary Domski (2013). Putting the Pieces Back Together Again: Reading Newton'sPrincipiathrough Newton's Method Steffen Ducheyne . “The Main Business of Natural Philosophy”: Isaac Newton's Natural-Philosophical Methodology . Dordrecht: Springer, 2012. Pp. Xxv+352. $189.00 (Cloth). William L. Harper . Isaac Newton's Scientific Method: Turning Data Into Evidence About Gravity and Cosmology . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. Xviii+424. $75.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):318-333.score: 90.0
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  34. Patrick Grim (2003). Computational Modeling as a Philosophical Methodology. In Luciano Floridi (ed.), Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell. 337--349.score: 90.0
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  35. Niccolò Guicciardini (2013). Harper and Ducheyne on Newton William L. Harper,Isaac Newton's Scientific Method, Turning Data Into Evidence About Gravity & Cosmology, Oxford University Press, 2011 Steffen Ducheyne,The Main Business of Natural Philosophy, Isaac Newton's Natural-Philosophical Methodology, Springer, 2102. Perspectives on Science 21 (4):463-481.score: 90.0
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  36. Eric Schliesser (2013). The Methodological Dimension of the Newtonian Revolution: Review Essay of Steffen Ducheyne: The Main Business of Natural Philosophy: Isaac Newton's Natural-Philosophical Methodology. Metascience.score: 90.0
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  37. Dana Goswick (2012). Philosophical Methodology in Modal Epistemology. Essays in Philosophy 13 (1):11.score: 90.0
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  38. David C. Thomasma (1991). Philosophical Methodology and Strikes. Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (1):16-17.score: 90.0
    ...how do we train residents to employ ethical reasoning? This is a good question, not only for the problem of strikes, but also for all medical training. The best method is inductive, since that most closely parallels the clinical reasoning processes that define the reality of medical practice. The strengths of inductive reasoning are that it most closely matches the realities of practice, it arises from the particular circumstances of the case, and it leads to a casuistic conclusion that applies (...)
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  39. Antonio T. De Nicolás (1971). Four-Dimensional Man: The Philosophical Methodology of the Rigveda. Bangalore,Dharmaram College.score: 90.0
     
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  40. Brian Grant (2011). Scepticism and Philosophical Methodology. Olms.score: 90.0
     
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  41. Kurian T. Kadankavil (1975). The Quest of the Real: A Study of the Philosophical Methodology of Mundakopanishad. Dharmaram Publications.score: 90.0
     
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  42. Yuri Cath, Metaphilosophy. Oxford Bibliographies Online.score: 84.0
    Often philosophers have reason to ask fundamental questions about the aims, methods, nature, or value of their own discipline. When philosophers systematically examine such questions, the resulting work is sometimes referred to as “metaphilosophy.” Metaphilosophy, it should be said, is not a well-established, or clearly demarcated, field of philosophical inquiry like epistemology or the philosophy of art. However, in the late 20th and early 21st centuries there has been a great deal of metaphilosophical work on issues concerning the (...) of philosophy in the analytic tradition. This article focuses on that work. (shrink)
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  43. Michael J. Shaffer (2007). Bealer on the Autonomy of Philosophical and Scientific Knowledge. Metaphilosophy 38 (1):44–54.score: 84.0
    In a series of influential articles, George Bealer argues for the autonomy of philosophical knowledge on the basis that philosophically known truths must be necessary truths. The main point of his argument is that the truths investigated by the sciences are contingent truths to be discovered a posteriori by observation, while the truths of philosophy are necessary truths to be discovered a priori by intuition. The project of assimilating philosophy to the sciences is supposed to be rendered illegitimate by (...)
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  44. Robert Klee (2008). Physical Scale Effects and Philosophical Thought Experiments. Metaphilosophy 39 (1):89–104.score: 84.0
    The scales across which physical properties exist are vast and subtle in their effects on particular systems placed locally on such scales. For example, human experiential access is restricted only to partial segments of the mass density, size, and temperature scales of the universe. I argue that philosophers must learn to appreciate better the effects of physical scales. Specifically, thought experiments in philosophy should be more sensitive to physical scale effects, because the conclusion of a thought experiment may be undermined (...)
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  45. Daniel F. Hartner (2013). Conceptual Analysis as Armchair Psychology: In Defense of Methodological Naturalism. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):921-937.score: 84.0
    Three proponents of the Canberra Plan, namely Jackson, Pettit, and Smith, have developed a collective functionalist program—Canberra Functionalism—spanning from philosophical psychology to ethics. They argue that conceptual analysis is an indispensible tool for research on cognitive processes since it reveals that there are some folk concepts, like belief and desire, whose functional roles must be preserved rather than eliminated by future scientific explanations. Some naturalists have recently challenged this indispensability argument, though the point of that challenge has been blunted (...)
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  46. Alvin I. Goldman (forthcoming). Philosophical Naturalism and Intuitional Methodology. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.score: 78.0
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  47. Jonathan M. Weinberg (2009). On Doing Better, Experimental-Style. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 145 (3):455 - 464.score: 78.0
    Timothy Williamson devotes significant effort in his The Philosophy of Philosophy to arguing against skepticism about judgment. One might think that the recent “experimental philosophy” challenge to the philosophical practice of appealing to intuitions as evidence is a possible target of those arguments. However, this is not so. The structure of that challenge is radically dissimilar from that of traditional skeptical arguments, and the aims of the challenge are entirely congruent with the spirit of methodological improvement that Williamson himself (...)
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  48. Hector-Neri Castañeda (1984). Tomberlin, Frege, and Guise Theory: A Note on the Methodology of Dia-Philosophical Comparisons. Synthese 61 (2):135 - 147.score: 78.0
    Tomberlin's comparative claims about the superiority of the De Dicto-De Re Account over Guise Theory concerning referential opacity are abortively premature. Nevertheless, he may be right. Yet the order of the day is to develop the De Re-De Dicto Account to the hilt. Not until this is done can any useful dia-philosophical comparison of the two theories yield any fruit. My deep desire is, of course, for the sheer enjoyment of experiencing the world from the perspective of each of (...)
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  49. Stuart C. Hackett (1969). Philosophical Objectivity and Existential Involvement in the Methodology of Paul Ricoeur. International Philosophical Quarterly 9 (1):11-39.score: 78.0
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  50. Eugen Fischer (2011). How to Practise Philosophy as Therapy: Philosophical Therapy and Therapeutic Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):49-82.score: 72.0
    Abstract: The notion that philosophy can be practised as a kind of therapy has become a focus of debate. This article explores how philosophy can be practised literally as a kind of therapy, in two very different ways: as philosophical therapy that addresses “real-life problems” (e.g., Sextus Empiricus) and as therapeutic philosophy that meets a need for therapy which arises in and from philosophical reflection (e.g., Wittgenstein). With the help of concepts adapted from cognitive and clinical psychology, and (...)
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