Search results for 'Philosophical anthropology History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Riccardo Martinelli (2010). Nature or History? Philosophical Anthropology in the History of Concepts. Etica E Politica 12 (2):12-26.
    In a renowned essay, Odo Marquard’s set a cornerstone in defining anthropology from a history of concepts point of view. In the light of more recent researches, some of his conclusions are here reconsidered and criticised. The concept of anthropology, as developed by Herder, Kant, Wilhelm von Humboldt, romantic philosophers and physicians, and finally by Hegel and some of his followers, offers no evidence for Marquard’s alleged opposition between anthropology and philosophy of history. On the (...)
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  2.  4
    W. H. Shaw (1988). Book Reviews : History, Revolution and Human Nature: Marx's Philosophical Anthropology.. By Joseph Bien. Amsterdam: B. R. Gruner Publishing, 1984. Pp. 228. D.M. 45.00 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):407-409.
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  3. Joseph Bien (1987). History, Revolution and Human Nature : Marx's Philosophical Anthropology. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 49 (2):344-344.
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  4. A. Pintorramos (1985). Metaphysics, History, and Anthropology-the Foundation of Philosophical Anthropology. Pensamiento 41 (161):3-36.
     
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  5. William H. Shaw (1988). "History, Revolution and Numan Nature: Marx's Philosophical Anthropology" by Joseph Bien. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):407.
     
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  6.  9
    Jayandra Soni (1989). Philosophical Anthropology in Śaiva Siddhānta: With Special Reference to Śivāgrayogin. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    CHAPTER Introduction Some basic questions in philosophical anthropology The question whether there is indeed a concern in Indian thought of what comes under ...
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  7.  3
    R. Martinelli (2010). Philosophical Anthropology: Historical Perspectives. Etica E Politica.
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  8.  48
    Christian Lotz (2005). From Nature to Culture? Diogenes and Philosophical Anthropology. Human Studies 28 (1):41 - 56.
    This essay is concerned with the central issue of philosophical anthropology: the relation between nature and culture. Although Rousseau was the first thinker to introduce this topic within the modern discourse of philosophy and the cultural sciences, it has its origin in Diogenes the Cynic, who was a disciple of Socrates. In my essay I (1) historically introduce a few aspects of philosophical anthropology, (2) deal with the nature–culture exchange, as introduced in Kant, then I (3) (...)
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  9. Ulf Bohmann & Darío Montero (2014). History, Critique, Social Change and Democracy An Interview with Charles Taylor. Constellations 21 (1):3-15.
    In this comprehensive interview with Charles Taylor, the focus is put on the conceptual level. Taylor reflects on the relationship between history, narrativity and social critique, between social imaginaries and social change, and between his own thought and that of Cambridge School history of ideas, Nietzschean genealogy, Frankfurt School critical theory, and agonistic approaches to the political. This interview not only captures the tremendous breadth and range of Taylor’s theoretical interests, it also vindicates his contention that the common (...)
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  10.  17
    Ivan Kolev (2008). Modal Thinking in the Philosophical Anthropology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:129-136.
    If we take a bird’s-eye view of the history of philosophical ideas and try to assess the place the problems of modality hold in it, it is likely that we will gain the impression that they are not among the priorities of philosophical thinking of the essence of human being. A closer look at some classical theses, however, can provide us with different answers. In § 76 of Critique of Judgement, which is actually “just” a comment on (...)
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  11.  15
    Andrew Oldenquist (1990). The Origins of Morality: An Essay in Philosophical Anthropology. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (1):121.
    By what steps, historically, did morality emerge? Our remote ancestors evolved into social animals. Sociality requires, among other things, restraints on disruptive sexual, hostile, aggressive, vengeful, and acquisitive behavior. Since we are innately social and not social by convention, we can assume the biological evolution of the emotional equipment – numerous predispositions to want, fear, feel anxious or secure – required for social living, just as we can assume cultural evolution of various means to control antisocial behavior and reinforce the (...)
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  12.  12
    Herman de Dijn (2003). Hume's Nonreductionist Philosophical Anthropology. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):587-603.
    Hume's *A Treatise of Human Nature* constitutes a philosophical anthropology quite different from a philosophy of (self-)consciousness or of the subject. According to Hume, the Self or Subject is itself a product of human nature, that is, of the workings of a structured set of principles which explains all typically human phenomena. On the same basis, Hume discusses all "moral" subjects, such as science, morality and politics (including economics), art and religion as well as the different reflections about (...)
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  13.  11
    Alec Gordon (2008). Area Studies, Planetary Thinking, and Philosophical Anthropology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:95-100.
    The aim of this paper is to consider the vicissitudes of “area studies” from the Second World War to the present focusing eventually on the normative imperative to develop a new paradigm of “planetary thinking.” First an overview of the history of “area studies” will be given from the start in the U.S. during the Second World War in response to the geostrategic imperative for America to know its new geopolitical responsibilities in a world divided by war. This security (...)
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  14.  4
    Andrea Borsari (2009). Notes on “Philosophical Anthropology” in Germany. An Introduction. Iris 1 (1):113-129.
    The article opens (§ 1) with the paradoxical situation of philosophical anthropology between a heralded destiny of decadence (W. Schulz) and the surge of its argumentations and notions in the present-day debate on ethical themes and on the very idea of “human nature,” as well as in the redefinition of social philosophy (J. Habermas and P. Sloterdijk). It seeks, then (§§ 2-5), to trace a sort of “metaphilosophy” of philosophical anthropology, discussing the principal interpretations (H. Schnädelbach, (...)
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  15.  2
    Antonio Calcagno (ed.) (2009). Human Being: A Philosophical Anthropology. University of Missouri.
    What is “human being”? In this book, Thomas Langan draws on a lifetime of study to offer a new understanding of this central question of our existence, turning to phenomenology and philosophical anthropology to help us better understand who we are as individuals and communities and what makes us act the way we do. While recognizing the human being as an individual with a particular genetic makeup and history, Langan also probes the real essence of human being (...)
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  16. Joseph Margolis (2008). The Arts and the Definition of the Human: Toward a Philosophical Anthropology. Stanford University Press.
    _The Arts and the Definition of the Human_ introduces a novel theory that our selves—our thoughts, perceptions, creativity, and other qualities that make us human—are determined by our place in history, and more particularly by our culture and language. Margolis rejects the idea that any concepts or truths remain fixed and objective through the flow of history and reveals that this theory of the human being as culturally determined and changing is necessary to make sense of art. He (...)
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  17. Alix Cohen (2009). Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Kant famously identified 'What is man?' as the fundamental question that encompasses the whole of philosophy. Yet surprisingly, there has been no concerted effort amongst Kant scholars to examine Kant's actual philosophy of man. This book, which is inspired by, and part of, the recent movement that focuses on the empirical dimension of Kant's works, is the first sustained attempt to extract from his writings on biology, anthropology and history an account of the human sciences, their underlying unity, (...)
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  18.  17
    Vida Pavesich (2011). The Anthropology of Hope and the Philosophy of History: Rethinking Kant's Third and Fourth Questions with Blumenberg and McCarthy. Thesis Eleven 104 (1):20-39.
    In order to address the question of hope in the present, it behooves us to revisit Kant’s third and fourth questions: ‘What may we hope?’ and ‘What is the human being?’ I reexamine these questions through an analysis of Thomas McCarthy’s recent book Race, Empire, and the Idea of Human Development and several works by Hans Blumenberg. I agree with McCarthy that Kant’s anthropology is incomplete and that the postmodern rejection of macronarratives was premature, but I claim that he (...)
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  19.  25
    Brian Jacobs & Patrick Kain (eds.) (2003). Essays on Kant's Anthropology. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's lectures on anthropology capture him at the height of his intellectual power. They are immensely important for advancing our understanding of Kant's conception of anthropology, its development, and the notoriously difficult relationship between it and the critical philosophy. This collection of new essays by some of the leading commentators on Kant offers the first systematic account of the philosophical importance of this material that should nevertheless prove of interest to historians of ideas and political theorists. There (...)
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  20. Vida Pavesich (2008). Hans Blumenberg's Philosophical Anthropology: After Heidegger and Cassirer. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 421-448.
    In this paper, I situate Hans Blumenberg historically and conceptually in relation to a subtheme in the famous debate between Martin Heidegger and Ernst Cassirer at Davos, Switzerland in 1929. The subtheme concerns Heidegger’s and Cassirer’s divergent attitudes toward philosophical anthropology as it relates to the starting points and goals of philosophy. I then reconstruct Blumenberg’s anthropology, which involves reconceptualizing Cassirer’s philosophy of symbolic forms in relation to Heidegger’s objections to the philosophical anthropology of his (...)
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  21.  3
    Keith R. Peterson (2010). All That We Are: Philosophical Anthropology and Ecophilosophy. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 6 (1):91-113.
    Ecophilosophers have long argued that addressing the environmental crisis not only demands reassessing the ethical aspects of human and nature relations, but also prevailing theories of human nature. Philosophical anthropology has historically taken this as its calling, and its resources may be profitably utilized in the context of ecophilosophy. Distinguishing between conservative and emancipatory naturalism leads to a critical discussion of the Cartesian culture/nature dualism. Marjorie Grene is discussed as a resource in the tradition of philosophical (...) which enables us to avoid dualistic thinking and espouse an emancipatory naturalism by resisting reductionism and acknowledging the diffuse dependence of human being on natural processes. In order to fully explicate the conditions of human dependence upon nature it becomes necessary to define an appropriate approach to ontology. This critical ontology facilitates a stratified understanding of the place of humans in nature without lapsing into reductivism or post-Kantian constructivism. It provides a sounder basis than either alternative for motivating a many- sided ecophilosophical perspective on human being. (shrink)
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  22.  27
    Mario C. Mapote (2013). Christ, the Perfection of Man: A Philosophical-Christological Approach on Christian Anthropology. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 3 (1).
    The study began with an introduction to Philosophy of Man. This Philosophical-Christological approach started with sense of self-awareness on this seemingly vain technological modern world. In the history of philosophy, there were three objects of study evolving by themselves, world, man and God in orderly fashion and repeating in interval phases. Self-experience shows three objects: first, existential unity (past), second, experiential unity (present) and third, transcendental unity (future). Western Philosophy banked on Aristotle’s notion of man as rational animal (...)
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  23.  7
    C. J. Berry (2003). Lusty Women and Loose Imagination: Hume's Philosophical Anthropology of Chastity. History of Political Thought 24 (3):415-434.
    According to Hume, humans, unlike other group-living animals, cannot accommodate their natural sexual appetite naturally; this is a Rawlsian 'circumstance of justice'. Humans have to formulate conventions or artifices to govern their reproductive relations in order to maintain their group or social life. Hume implicitly addresses this issue in his discussion of chastity. The paper explicates his argument. This argument, and its underlying philosophical anthropology, is seen to embody a distinctive approach to a striking feature of the human (...)
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  24.  2
    Arran Gare (2009). Philosophical Anthropology, Ethics and Political Philosophy in an Age of Impending Catastrophe. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 5 (2):264-286.
    In this paper it is argued that philosophical anthropology is central to ethics and politics. The denial of this has facilitated the triumph of debased notions of humans developed by Hobbes which has facilitated the enslavement of people to the logic of the global market, a logic which is now destroying the ecological conditions for civilization and most life on Earth. Reviving the classical understanding of the central place of philosophical anthropology to ethics and politics, the (...)
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  25.  2
    Jerome Carroll (2013). 'Indirect' or 'Engaged': A Comparison of Hans Blumenberg's and Charles Taylor's Debt and Contribution to Philosophical Anthropology. History of European Ideas 39 (6):858-878.
    Summary This article presents and compares aspects of Charles Taylor's and Hans Blumenberg's seemingly opposing views about agency and epistemology, setting them in the context of the tradition in German ideas called ?philosophical anthropology?, with which both align their thinking. It presents key strands of this tradition, from their inception in the late eighteenth century in the writings of Herder, Schiller and others associated with anthropology to their articulation by thinkers such as Max Scheler, Arnold Gehlen and (...)
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  26. Glynn Custred (2016). A History of Anthropology as a Holistic Science. Lexington Books.
    A History of Anthropology as a Holistic Science discusses the four fields of anthropology as a holistic science and the feasibility of such an approach through an examination of its history and its philosophical foundation. It elucidates the 1960s movement that threatens to discredit the discipline as an effective way of understanding humankind.
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  27.  12
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1975/1983). Aristotle's Man: Speculations Upon Aristotelian Anthropology. Clarendon Press.
    Words have determinable sense only within a complex of unstated assumptions, and all interpretation must therefore go beyond the given material. This book addresses what is man's place in the Aristotelian world. It also describes man's abilities and prospects in managing his life, and considers how far Aristotle's treatment of time and history licenses the sort of dynamic interpretation of his doctrines that have been given. The ontological model that explains much of Aristotle's conclusions and methods is one of (...)
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  28.  20
    Beverley Clack (ed.) (1999). Misogyny in the Western Philosophical Tradition: A Reader. Routledge.
    From some of the great philosophers of the Western tradition: "The Devils gateway" --Tertullian "A misbegotten male" --Aquinas "Big children their whole life long" --Schopenhauer The roots of philosophical misogyny in the writings of thinkers from the ancient Greeks through the modern age are exposed and explored in this collection. Beverley Clack questions whether the wisdom of these philosophers can be separated from the misogyny, and whether feminists should seek an alternative to the Western philosophical canon. This collection (...)
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  29.  4
    Phillip Honenberger (2015). Animality, Sociality, and Historicity in Helmuth Plessner’s Philosophical Anthropology. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (5):707-729.
    Axel Honneth and Hans Joas claim that Helmuth Plessner’s philosophical anthropology is problematically ‘solipsistic’ insofar as it fails to appreciate the ways in which human persons or selves are brought into being and given their characteristic powers of reflection and action by social processes. Here I review the main argument of Plessner’s Die Stufen des Organischen und der Mensch: Einleitung in die philosophische Anthropologie with this criticism in mind, giving special attention to Plessner’s accounts of organic being, personhood, (...)
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  30.  37
    Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.) (1985). The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press.
    The concept that peope have of themselves as a 'person' is one of the most intimate notions that they hold. Yet the way in which the category of the person is conceived varies over time and space. In this volume, anthropologists, philosophers, and historians examine the notion of the person in different cultures, past and present. Taking as their starting point a lecture on the person as a category of the human mind, given by Marcel Mauss in 1938, the contributors (...)
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  31.  7
    Felipe Fernández-Armesto (2004). Humankind: A Brief History. Oxford University Press.
    The discovery that the DNA of chimpanzees and humans is incredibly similar, sharing 98% of the same code, suggests that there is very little different--or special--about the human animal. Likewise, advances in artificial intelligence mean that humans no longer have exclusive access to reason, consciousness and imagination. Indeed, the harder we cling to the concept of humanity, the more slippery it becomes. But if it breaks down altogether, what will this mean for human values, human rights, and the defense of (...)
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  32.  8
    Jo-Jo Koo (2007). The Possibility of Philosophical Anthropology. In Georg W. Bertram, Robin Celikates, Christophe Laudou & David Lauer (eds.), Socialité et reconnaissance: Grammaires de l’humain. L'Harmattan 105-121.
    Is a conception of human nature still possible or even desirable in light of the “postmetaphysical sensibilities” of our time? Furthermore, can philosophy make any contribution towards the articulation of a tenable conception of human nature given this current intellectual climate? I will argue in this paper that affirmative answers can be given to both of these questions. Section I rehearses briefly some of the difficulties and even dangers involved in working out any conception of human nature at all, let (...)
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  33.  39
    Nicholas Rescher (1990). Human Interests: Reflections on Philosophical Anthropology. Stanford University Press.
    Philosophical anthropology is the philosophical study of the conditions of human existence and the issues that confront people in the conduct of their everyday lives. This book surveys, from a contemplative, philosophical point of view, a wide variety of human-interest issues, including happiness, luck, aging, the meaning of life, optimism and pessimism, morality, and faith and belief. The author's deliberations blend historical, theoretical, and personal perspectives into philosophical appreciation of the human condition. The philosophers of (...)
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  34. Lakshmi Biswas (1991). Tagore & Iqbal: A Study in Philosophical Perspective. Capital Pub. House.
     
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  35.  4
    L. D. Derksen (1996). Dialogues on Women: Images of Women in the History of Philosophy. Vu University Press.
  36.  25
    Gabriel Peters (2012). The Social as Heaven and Hell: Pierre Bourdieu's Philosophical Anthropology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):63-86.
    Many authors have argued that all studies of socially specific modalities of human action and experience depend on some form of “philosophical anthropology”, i.e. on a set of general assumptions about what human beings are like, assumptions without which the very diagnoses of the cultural and historical variability of concrete agents' practices would become impossible. Bourdieu was sensitive to that argument and, especially in the later phase of his career, attempted to make explicit how his historical-sociological investigations presupposed (...)
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  37.  12
    Sergeiy Sandler (2013). Language and Philosophical Anthropology in the Work of Mikhail Bakhtin and the Bakhtin Circle. Rivista Italiana di Filosofia Del Linguiaggio 7 (2):152-165.
    The Bakhtin Circle’s conception of language is very much still alive, still productive, in the language sciences today. My claim in this paper is that to understand the Bakhtin Circle’s continuing relevance to the language sciences, we have to look beyond the linguistic theory itself, to the philosophical groundwork laid for this project by Bakhtin in what he himself referred to as his philosophical anthropology. This philosophical anthropology, at the center of which stands an architectonics (...)
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  38.  6
    Predrag Krstic (2007). Philosophical Anthropology, Anthropologic of Philosophy and After. Filozofija I Društvo 18 (1):9-48.
    This expose deals, first of all, with suppositions, structure and range of human thinking that has been undertaken, very ambitiously, by "philosophical anthropology" at the beginning of the twentieth century. And then, through philosophical critique and self-critique of its status and limitations of this "discipline", it is indicating the orientation of recent controversy regarding the possibilities and characters of radical dismissal and/or reaffirmation of philosopheme "man".
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  39.  6
    Anna Borisenkova (2012). Introduction: Philosophical Anthropology and Social Analysis. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 3 (1):1-5.
    The guest editor introduces No. 3 Vol. 1 (2012), "Philosophical Anthropology and Social Analysis." .
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  40.  89
    Wayne Hudson (1993). After Blumenberg: Historicism and Philosophical Anthropology. History of the Human Sciences 6 (4):109-116.
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  41.  52
    William R. Woodward (1996). Inner Migration or Disguised Reform? Political Interests of Hermann Lotze's Philosophical Anthropology. History of the Human Sciences 9 (1):1-26.
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  42.  18
    Sigrid Knecht (1968). Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophy and History 1 (1):25-26.
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  43.  9
    Gerd Wolandt (1969). Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophy and History 2 (2):160-161.
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  44.  9
    Heinrich Weiss (1974). Philosophical Anthropology Today. Philosophy and History 7 (2):161-165.
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  45.  21
    Amelie Rorty (2008). Review: Zöller & Louden (Eds), Anthropology, History and Education. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
  46.  7
    Otto Spear (1974). Philosophical Anthropology Today. 11 Contributions. Philosophy and History 7 (1):31-32.
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  47.  9
    Felipe Fernández-Armesto (2004). So You Think You're Human?: A Brief History of Humankind. Oxford University Press.
    So You Think You're Human? confronts these problems from a historical perspective, showing how our current understanding of what it means to be human has been ...
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  48. Maurice Finocchiaro (1978). Towards a Rational Philosophical Anthropology by Joseph Agassi. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 69:437-438.
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  49. Arne Jarrick (ed.) (2000). Only Human: Studies in the History of the Conceptions of Man. Almqvist & Wiksell International.
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  50. Hans-Peter Krüger (2015). Life-Philosophical Anthropology as the Missing Third: On Peter Gordon'sContinental Divide. History of European Ideas 41 (4):432-439.
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