Search results for 'Philosophical behaviorism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bruce A. Thyer (ed.) (1999). The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 54.0
    The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism is the first book to describe the unique contributions of a behavioral perspective to the major issues of philosophy. Leading behavioral philosophers and psychologists have contributed chapters on: the origins of behaviorism as a philosophy of science; the basic principles of behaviorism; ontology; epistemology; values and ethics; free will, determinism and self-control; and language and verbal behavior. A concluding chapter provides an overview of some scholarly criticisms of behavioral philosophy. Far from (...)
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  2. Mark Crooks (2004). The Last Philosophical Behaviorist: Content and Consciousness Explained Away. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):50-121.score: 48.0
  3. Frank Diehl (1934). An Historical and Critical Study of Radical Behaviorism as a Philosophical Doctrine. Baltimore.score: 42.0
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  4. Paul A. Weiss (1942). Cosmic Behaviorism. Philosophical Review 51 (July):345-356.score: 36.0
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  5. Andrew Backe (2000). Book Review:The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism Bruce A. Thyer. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 67 (3):546-.score: 36.0
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  6. Erik Gotlind (1958). Three Theories Of Emotion: Some Views On Philosophical Method. Lund,: Gleerup.score: 36.0
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  7. Howard Rachlin (1994). Behavior and Mind: The Roots of Modern Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 31.0
    This book attempts to synthesize two apparently contradictory views of psychology: as the science of internal mental mechanisms and as the science of complex external behavior. Most books in the psychology and philosophy of mind reject one approach while championing the other, but Rachlin argues that the two approaches are complementary rather than contradictory. Rejection of either involves disregarding vast sources of information vital to solving pressing human problems--in the areas of addiction, mental illness, education, crime, and decision-making, to name (...)
     
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  8. Hanoch Ben-Yami (2005). Behaviorism and Psychologism: Why Block's Argument Against Behaviorism is Unsound. Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):179-186.score: 30.0
    Ned Block ((1981). Psychologism and behaviorism. Philosophical Review, 90, 5-43.) argued that a behaviorist conception of intelligence is mistaken, and that the nature of an agent's internal processes is relevant for determining whether the agent has intelligence. He did that by describing a machine which lacks intelligence, yet can answer questions put to it as an intelligent person would. The nature of his machine's internal processes, he concluded, is relevant for determining that it lacks intelligence. I argue (...)
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  9. Scott Soames (2007). What We Know Now That We Didn't Know Then: Reply to Critics of the Age of Meaning. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 135 (3):461 - 478.score: 30.0
    Author’s response to critical essays by Brian Weatherson, Alex Byrne, and Stephen Yablo on Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century, Volume 2 The Age of Meaning.
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  10. David L. Boyer (1985). True Christians and Straw Behaviorists: Remarks on Hocutt. Behaviorism 13 (2):163-170.score: 30.0
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  11. Leslie Forster Stevenson (ed.) (2000). The Study of Human Nature: A Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The second edition of this exceptional anthology provides an introduction to a wide variety of views on human nature. Drawing from diverse cultures over three millennia, Leslie Stevenson has chosen selections ranging from ancient religious texts to contemporary theories based on evolutionary science. An ideal companion to the editor's recent book, Ten Theories of Human Nature, 3/e (OUP, 1998), this interdisciplinary reader can also be used independently. The Study of Human Nature, 2/e offers substantial selections illustrating the ten perspectives discussed (...)
     
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  12. M. Moskopp Kurthen, Linke D. & Reuter D. B. (1991). The Locked-in Syndrome and the Behaviorist Epistemology of Other Minds. Theoretical Medicine 12 (March):69-79.score: 27.0
    In this paper, the problem of correct ascriptions of consciousness to patients in neurological intensive care medicine is explored as a special case of the general philosophical other minds problem. It is argued that although clinical ascriptions of consciousness and coma are mostly based on behavioral evidence, a behaviorist epistemology of other minds is not likely to succeed. To illustrate this, the so-called total locked-in syndrome, in which preserved consciousness is combined with a total loss of motor abilities due (...)
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  13. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1974). Philosophy Of Psychology. London,: Macmillan.score: 27.0
  14. David M. Armstrong (1968). A Materialist Theory of the Mind. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This classic work of recent philosophy was first published in 1968, and remains the most compelling and comprehensive statement of the view that the mind is material or physical. In A Materialist Theory of the Mind , D. M. Armstrong provided insight into the debate surrounding the relationship of the mind and body. He put forth a detailed materialist account of all the main mental phenomena, including perception, sensation, belief, the will, introspection, mental images, and consciousness. This causal analysis of (...)
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  15. Ludwig Wittgenstein (1975/1980). Philosophical Remarks. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    When in May 1930, the Council of Trinity College, Cambridge, had to decide whether to renew Wittgenstein's research grant, it turned to Bertrand Russell for an assessment of the work Wittgenstein had been doing over the past year. His verdict: "The theories contained in this new work . . . are novel, very original and indubitably important. Whether they are true, I do not know. As a logician who likes simplicity, I should like to think that they are not, but (...)
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  16. Frederick V. Smith (1959). Psychological Concepts and Linguistic Restraints. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 10 (November):223-227.score: 24.0
  17. Alfred C. Ewing (1945). Are Mental Attributes Attributes of the Body? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 45:27-58.score: 24.0
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  18. C. A. Mace (1949). Some Implications of Analytical Behaviourism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 49:1-16.score: 24.0
     
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  19. Leslie Forster Stevenson (ed.) (1981). The Study of Human Nature: Readings. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
     
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  20. Samuel Weir (2007). Kripke's Second Paragraph of Philosophical Investigations 201. Philosophical Investigations 30 (2):172–178.score: 21.0
    The received view of Kripke's Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language is that it fails as an interpretation because, inter alia, it ignores or overlooks what Wittgenstein has to say in the second paragraph of Philosophical Investigations 201. In this paper, I demonstrate that the paragraph in question is in fact fully accommodated within Kripke's reading, and cannot therefore be reasonably utilised to object to it. -/- In part one I characterise the objection; in part two I explain why (...)
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  21. Eugen Fischer (2011). Diseases of the Understanding and the Need for Philosophical Therapy. Philosophical Investigations 34 (1):22-54.score: 21.0
    The paper develops and addresses a major challenge for therapeutic conceptions of philosophy of the sort increasingly attributed to Wittgenstein. To be substantive and relevant, such conceptions have to identify “diseases of the understanding” from which philosophers suffer, and to explain why these “diseases” need to be cured in order to resolve or overcome important philosophical problems. The paper addresses this challenge in three steps: With the help of findings and concepts from cognitive linguistics and cognitive psychology, it redevelops (...)
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  22. Fred A. Keijzer (2005). Theoretical Behaviorism Meets Embodied Cognition: Two Theoretical Analyses of Behavior. Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):123-143.score: 21.0
    This paper aims to do three things: First, to provide a review of John Staddon's book Adaptive dynamics: The theoretical analysis of behavior. Second, to compare Staddon's behaviorist view with current ideas on embodied cognition. Third, to use this comparison to explicate some outlines for a theoretical analysis of behavior that could be useful as a behavioral foundation for cognitive phenomena. Staddon earlier defended a theoretical behaviorism, which allows internal states in its models but keeps these to a minimum (...)
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  23. Adam Feltz & Edward Cokely (2012). The Philosophical Personality Argument. Philosophical Studies 161 (2):227-246.score: 21.0
    Perhaps personality traits substantially influence one’s philosophically relevant intuitions. This suggestion is not only possible, it is consistent with a growing body of empirical research: Personality traits have been shown to be systematically related to diverse intuitions concerning some fundamental philosophical debates. We argue that this fact, in conjunction with the plausible principle that almost all adequate philosophical views should take into account all available and relevant evidence, calls into question some prominent approaches to traditional philosophical projects. (...)
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  24. Jonathan Livengood, Justin Sytsma, Adam Feltz, Richard Scheines & Edouard Machery (2010). Philosophical Temperament. Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):313-330.score: 21.0
    Many philosophers have worried about what philosophy is. Often they have looked for answers by considering what it is that philosophers do. Given the diversity of topics and methods found in philosophy, however, we propose a different approach. In this article we consider the philosophical temperament, asking an alternative question: What are philosophers like? Our answer is that one important aspect of the philosophical temperament is that philosophers are especially reflective. This claim is supported by a study of (...)
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  25. C. Chihara & Jerry A. Fodor (1965). Operationalism and Ordinary Language: A Critique of Wittgenstein. American Philosophical Quarterly 2 (October):281-95.score: 21.0
    This paper explores some lines of argument in wittgenstein's post-Tractatus writings in order to indicate the relations between wittgenstein's philosophical psychology, On the one hand, And his philosophy of language, His epistemology, And his doctrines about the nature of philosophical analysis on the other. The authors maintain that the later writings of wittgenstein express a coherent doctrine in which an operationalistic analysis of confirmation and language supports a philosophical psychology of a type the authors call "logical (...)." they also maintain that there are good grounds for rejecting the philosophical theory implicit in wittgenstein's later works. In particular, They first argue that wittgenstein's position leads to some implausible conclusions concerning the nature of language and psychology; second, They maintain that the arguments wittgenstein provides are inconclusive; and third, They sketch an alternative position which they believe avoids many of the difficulties implicit in wittgenstein's philosophy. (shrink)
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  26. Hamid Seyedsayamdost (forthcoming). On Gender and Philosophical Intuition: Failure of Replication and Other Negative Results. Philosophical Psychology.score: 21.0
    On gender and philosophical intuition: Failure of replication and other negative results. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2014.893288.
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  27. Nicholas Rescher (1990). Human Interests: Reflections on Philosophical Anthropology. Stanford University Press.score: 21.0
    Philosophical anthropology is the philosophical study of the conditions of human existence and the issues that confront people in the conduct of their everyday lives. This book surveys, from a contemplative, philosophical point of view, a wide variety of human-interest issues, including happiness, luck, aging, the meaning of life, optimism and pessimism, morality, and faith and belief. The author's deliberations blend historical, theoretical, and personal perspectives into philosophical appreciation of the human condition. The philosophers of Greek (...)
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  28. Aleksandar Fatic (2013). Epicurean Ethics as a Foundation for Philosophical Counseling. Philosophical Practice 8 (1):1127–1141.score: 21.0
    The paper discusses the manner and extent to which Epicurean ethics can serve as a general philosophy of life, capable of supporting philosophical practice in the form of philosophical counseling. Unlike the modern age academic philosophy, the philosophical practice movement portrays the philosopher as a personal or corporate adviser, one who helps people make sense of their experiences and find optimum solutions within the context of their values and general preferences. Philosophical counseling may rest on almost (...)
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  29. Gordon R. Foxall (2007). Intentional Behaviorism. Behavior and Philosophy 35:1 - 55.score: 21.0
    Two of the leading contenders to explain behavior are radical behaviorism and intentionality: an account that seeks to confine itself to descriptions of response–environment correlations and one that employs the language of beliefs and desires to explicate its subject matter. While each claims an exclusive right to undertake this task, this paper argues that neither can be eliminated from a complete explanatory account of human behavior. The behavior analysis derived from radical behaviorism is generally sufficient for the prediction (...)
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  30. George Graham (2002). Recent Work in Philosophical Psychopathology. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (2):109-134.score: 21.0
    Philosophical psychopathology lies at the intersection of philosophy and psychiatry. The name is new. The field is not. This paper surveys work in the field since about 1980. Special attention is given to work on two topics: mental illness semantics and the metaphysics of disorders of self-consciousness.
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  31. J. W. Scott (1920). Syndicalism and Philosophical Realism. Philosophical Review 29 (2):179-183.score: 21.0
    To anyone who is looking for light it is a pleasure to receive a criticism so acute and on the whole so fair-minded as Professor Montague has given to my little book on Syndicalism and Philosophical Realism in the last number of the Philosophical Review. I am indebted to the editor for permission to publish a few lines of reply,...
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  32. Richard F. Kitchener (2004). Bertrand Russell's Flirtation with Behaviorism. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):273 - 291.score: 21.0
    Although numerous aspects of Bertrand Russell's philosophical views have been discussed, his views about the nature of the mind and the place of psychology within modern science have received less attention. In particular, there has been little discussion of what I will call "Russell's flirtation with behaviorism." Although some individuals have mentioned this phase in Russell's philosophical career, they have not adequately situated it within Russell's changing philosophical views, in particular, his naturalistic epistemology. I briefly discuss (...)
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  33. Steven C. Hayes, Kelly G. Wilson & Elizabeth V. Gifford (1999). The Birth of Behaviorism and the Elimination of Introspection. In Bruce A. Thyer (ed.), The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 153.score: 21.0
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  34. Jay Moore (1999). The Basic Principles of Behaviorism. In. In Bruce A. Thyer (ed.), The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 41--68.score: 21.0
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  35. Roger Schnaitter (1999). Some Criticisms of Behaviorism. In. In Bruce A. Thyer (ed.), The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 209--249.score: 21.0
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  36. Mark Fedyk (2009). Philosophical Intuitions. Studia Philosophica Estonica 2 (2):54-80.score: 18.0
    What exactly is a philosophical intuition? And what makes such an intuition reliable, when it is reliable? This paper provides a terminological framework that is able answer to the first question, and then puts the framework to work developing an answer to the second question. More specifically, the paper argues that we can distinguish between two different "evidential roles" which intuitions can occupy: under certain conditions they can provide information about the representational structure of an intuitor's concept, and under (...)
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  37. Ned Block (1981). Psychologism and Behaviorism. Philosophical Review 90 (1):5-43.score: 18.0
    Let psychologism be the doctrine that whether behavior is intelligent behavior depends on the character of the internal information processing that produces it. More specifically, I mean psychologism to involve the doctrine that two systems could have actual and potential behavior _typical_ of familiar intelligent beings, that the two systems could be exactly alike in their actual and potential behavior, and in their behavioral dispositions and capacities and counterfactual behavioral properties (i.e., what behaviors, behavioral dispositions, and behavioral capacities they would (...)
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  38. Edouard Machery (2011). Thought Experiments and Philosophical Knowledge. Metaphilosophy 42 (3):191-214.score: 18.0
    Abstract: While thought experiments play an important role in contemporary analytic philosophy, much remains unclear about thought experiments. In particular, it is still unclear whether the judgments elicited by thought experiments can provide evidence for the premises of philosophical arguments. This article argues that, if an influential and promising view about the nature of the judgments elicited by thought experiments is correct, then many thought experiments in philosophy fail to provide any evidence for the premises of philosophical arguments.
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  39. John Symons (2008). Intuition and Philosophical Methodology. Axiomathes 18 (1):67-89.score: 18.0
    Intuition serves a variety of roles in contemporary philosophy. This paper provides a historical discussion of the revival of intuition in the 1970s, untangling some of the ways that intuition has been used and offering some suggestions concerning its proper place in philosophical investigation. Contrary to some interpretations of the results of experimental philosophy, it is argued that generalized skepticism with respect to intuition is unwarranted. Intuition can continue to play an important role as part of a methodologically conservative (...)
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  40. Leo Elders (1990). The Philosophical Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas. E.J. Brill.score: 18.0
    INTRODUCTION Philosophical theology is the systematic inquiry about God's existence and being. We find it in Aristotle's Metaphysics, in Cicero's De natura ...
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  41. Eugen Fischer (2011). How to Practise Philosophy as Therapy: Philosophical Therapy and Therapeutic Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):49-82.score: 18.0
    Abstract: The notion that philosophy can be practised as a kind of therapy has become a focus of debate. This article explores how philosophy can be practised literally as a kind of therapy, in two very different ways: as philosophical therapy that addresses “real-life problems” (e.g., Sextus Empiricus) and as therapeutic philosophy that meets a need for therapy which arises in and from philosophical reflection (e.g., Wittgenstein). With the help of concepts adapted from cognitive and clinical psychology, and (...)
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  42. Xiaoli Liu (2010). Gödel's Philosophical Program and Husserl's Phenomenology. Synthese 175 (1):33 - 45.score: 18.0
    Gödel’s philosophical rationalism includes a program for “developing philosophy as an exact science.” Gödel believes that Husserl’s phenomenology is essential for the realization of this program. In this article, by analyzing Gödel’s philosophy of idealism, conceptual realism, and his concept of “abstract intuition,” based on clues from Gödel’s manuscripts, I try to investigate the reasons why Gödel is strongly interested in Husserl’s phenomenology and why his program for an exact philosophy is unfinished. One of the topics that has attracted (...)
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  43. Stephen T. Davis (2006). Christian Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Christian Philosophical Theology constitutes a Christian philosopher's look at various crucial topics in Christian theology, including belief in God, the nature of God, the Trinity, christology, the resurrection of Jesus, the general resurrection, redemption, and theological method. The book is tightly argued, and amounts to a coherent explanation of and case for the Christian world view. Although written from a broadly Reformed Protestant perspective, and although the author does not avoid controversial topics, his aim is to present a `merely (...)
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  44. Eugen Fischer (2009). Philosophical Pictures and Secondary Qualities. Synthese 171 (1):77 - 110.score: 18.0
    The paper presents a novel account of nature and genesis of some philosophical problems, which vindicates a new approach to an arguably central and extensive class of such problems: The paper develops the Wittgensteinian notion of ‘philosophical pictures’ with the help of some notions adapted from metaphor research in cognitive linguistics and from work on unintentional analogical reasoning in cognitive psychology. The paper shows that adherence to such pictures systematically leads to the formulation of unwarranted claims, ill-motivated problems, (...)
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  45. Tyrus Fisher (2011). Quine's Behaviorism and Linguistic Meaning: Why Quine's Behaviorism is Not Illicit. Philosophia 39 (1):51-59.score: 18.0
    Some of Quine’s critics charge that he arrives at a behavioristic account of linguistic meaning by starting from inappropriately behavioristic assumptions (Kripke 1982, 14; Searle 1987, 123). Quine has even written that this account of linguistic meaning is a consequence of his behaviorism (Quine 1992, 37). I take it that the above charges amount to the assertion that Quine assumes the denial of one or more of the following claims: (1) Language-users associate mental ideas with their linguistic expressions. (2) (...)
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  46. Paul Muench (1993). The Analogy Between Psychoanalysis and Wittgenstein's Later Philosophical Methods. Dissertation, University of Oxfordscore: 18.0
    Wittgenstein’s analogy between psychoanalysis and his later philosophical methods is explored and developed. Historical evidence supports the claim that Wittgenstein characterized an early version of his general remarks on philosophy (§§89-133 in the Philosophical Investigations) as a sustained comparison with psychoanalysis. A non-adversarial, therapeutic interpretation is adopted towards Wittgenstein which emphasizes his focus on dissolving the metaphysical puzzlement of particular troubled individuals. A “picture” of Freudian psychoanalysis is sketched which highlights several features of Freud’s therapeutic techniques and his (...)
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  47. Eugen Fischer (2011). Philosophical Delusion and its Therapy: Outline of a Philosophical Revolution. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Philosophical Delusion and its Therapy provides new foundations and methods for the revolutionary project of philosophical therapy pioneered by Ludwig Wittgenstein. The book vindicates this currently much-discussed project by reconstructing the genesis of important philosophical problems: With the help of concepts adapted from cognitive linguistics and cognitive psychology, the book analyses how philosophical reflection is shaped by pictures and metaphors we are not aware of employing and are prone to misapply. Through innovative case-studies on the genesis (...)
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  48. Douglas C. Long (1964). The Philosophical Concept of a Human Body. Philosophical Review 73 (July):321-337.score: 18.0
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  49. Robert Merrihew Adams (1987). The Virtue of Faith and Other Essays in Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Robert Merrihew Adams has been a leader in renewing philosophical respect for the idea that moral obligation may be founded on the commands of God. This collection of Adams' essays, two of which are previously unpublished, draws from his extensive writings on philosophical theology that discuss metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical issues surrounding the concept of God--whether God exists or not, what God is or would be like, and how we ought to relate ourselves to such a being. Adams (...)
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  50. Søren Overgaard (2004). Exposing the Conjuring Trick: Wittgenstein on Subjectivity. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (3):263-286.score: 18.0
    Since the publication of the Philosophical Investigations in 1953, Wittgenstein''s later philosophy of mind has been the subject of numerous books and articles. Although most commentators agree that Wittgenstein was neither a behaviorist nor a Cartesian dualist, many continue to ascribe to him a position that strongly resembles one of the alternatives. In contrast, this paper argues that Wittgenstein was strongly opposed to behaviorism and Cartesianism, and that he was concerned to show that these positions implicitly share a (...)
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