Search results for 'Philosophical pedagogy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lucio Angelo Privitello (2010). Josiah Royce and the Problems of Philosophical Pedagogy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):111-142.score: 180.0
    The power, depth, and humanity of the work and life of Josiah Royce gains in richness by following his reflections on the problems of philosophical pedagogy. While engaged as a professor of philosophy, author, advisor, and administrator, Royce developed and refined guidelines for the philosophy of education, and the art of philosophical pedagogy. Except for a few personal recollections from his students and colleagues, an article by Frank M. Oppenheim that appeared thirty-five years ago, and the (...)
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  2. Michael Cholbi (2007). Intentional Learning as a Model for Philosophical Pedagogy. Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):35-58.score: 156.0
    The achievement of intentional learning is a powerful paradigm for the objectives and methods of the teaching of philosophy. This paradigm sees the objectives and methods of such teaching as based not simply on the mastery of content, but as rooted in attempts to shape the various affective and cognitive factors that influence students’ learning efforts. The goal of such pedagogy is to foster an intentional learning orientation, one characterized by self-awareness, active monitoring of the learning process, and a (...)
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  3. Vesa Taatila & Katariina Raij (2011). Philosophical Review of Pragmatism as a Basis for Learning by Developing Pedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):831-844.score: 156.0
    This article discusses the use of a pragmatic approach as the philosophical foundation of pedagogy in Finnish universities of applied sciences. It is presented that the mission of the universities of applied sciences falls into the interpretive paradigm of social sciences. This view is used as a starting point for a discussion about pragmatism in higher education. The Learning by Developing (LbD) action model is introduced, analyzed and compared to pragmatism. The paper concludes that, at least in practice-oriented (...)
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  4. Lucio Angelo Privitello (2010). Josiah Royce and the Problems of Philosophical Pedagogy, Part Two. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (2):300-320.score: 156.0
    Between 1903 and 1913, Royce was recovering from the intensity of having written The World and the Individual. He had experienced family tragedies and an intense lecture schedule, speaking at a variety of American universities as well as at venues abroad. In this period Royce dedicated fewer pieces to the philosophy of pedagogy. These pieces, taken together, closely circumscribe his later works on religion, logic, and ethics. After dedicating lectures and pieces on the psychological underpinnings of pedagogy, and (...)
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  5. Jon Stewart (1995). The Philosopher as Teacher: Schopenhauer's Charge and Modern Academic Philosophy: Some Problems Facing Philosophical Pedagogy. Metaphilosophy 26 (3):270-278.score: 150.0
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  6. Ruth Ginzberg (1999). The Personal Is Philosophical, or Teaching a Life and Living the Truth: Philosophical Pedagogy at the Boundaries of Self. In Emanuela Bianchi (ed.), Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press. 50.score: 150.0
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  7. Pierre Manent (2012). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction / Eve Grace and Christopher Kelly; Part I. Politics and Economics: 1. Rousseau and the Illustrious Montesquieu / Christopher Kelly; 2. Political Economy and Individual Liberty / Ryan Patrick Hanley; Part II. Science and Epistemology: 3. The Presence of Sciences in Rousseau's Trajectory and Works / Bruno Bernardi and Bernadette Bensaud-Vincent; 4. Epistemology and Political Perception in the Case of Rousseau / Terence Marshall; Part III. The Modern or Classical, Theological or Philosophical, Foundations of Rousseau's System: 5. On the Intention of Rousseau / Leo Strauss; 6. On Strauss on Rousseau / Victor Gourevitch; 7. Built on Sand: Moral Law in Rousseau's Second Discourse / Victor Gourevitch; 8. Rousseau and Pascal / Matthew W. Maguire; Part IV. Rousseau as Educator and Legislator: 9. The Measure of the Possible: Imagination in Rousseau's Philosophical Pedagogy / Richard Velkley; 10. Rousseau's French Revolution / Pamela K. Jensen; 11. Ro. [REVIEW] In Eve Grace & Christopher Kelly (eds.), The Challenge of Rousseau. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
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  8. Seth Tichenor (2007). Looking Beyond Daraa: A Philosophical Exploration of the Guru's Pedagogy in the Yoga Vāsishha. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):83 – 95.score: 120.0
    This paper investigates the concept of the guru within this important work of the Vedantic tradition. I identify some of the apparent problems involved with the very idea of spiritual teaching within the ontological and soteriological parameters of this tradition in general, and the work in particular. First, the emphasis on 'self-effort' on the part of the seeker of liberation seems to preclude the idea of a spiritual teacher of liberation. Second, it is difficult to see how teaching even proceeds (...)
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  9. Stephen Nathan Haymes (2001). Pedagogy and the Philosophical Anthropology of African American Slave Culture. Philosophia Africana 4 (2):63-92.score: 120.0
  10. Gary Potter (2007). Politics, Pedagogy and the 'Reluctant Student.' Review ofThe Philosophy of Social Science: The Philosophical Foundations of Social Thought by Ted Benton and Ian Craib. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (1):79-83.score: 120.0
  11. Jeffrey Schwegman (2010). The "System" as a Reading Technology: Pedagogy and Philosophical Criticism in Condillac's Traité des Systêmes. Journal of the History of Ideas 71 (3):387-409.score: 120.0
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  12. Neil Brady & David Hart (2007). An Exploration Into the Developmental Psychology of Ethical Theory with Implications for Business Practice and Pedagogy. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (4):397 - 412.score: 84.0
    This article is an attempt to understand ethical theory not just as a set of well-developed philosophical perspectives but as a range of moral capacities that human beings more or less grow into over the course of their lives. To this end, we explore the connection between formal ethical theories and stage developmental psychologies, showing how individuals mature morally, regarding their duties, responsibilities, ideals, goals, values, and interests. The primary method is to extract from the writings of Kohlberg and (...)
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  13. Peter Boghossian (2011). Socratic Pedagogy: Perplexity, Humiliation, Shame and a Broken Egg. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):710-720.score: 66.0
    This article addresses and rebuts the claim that the purpose of the Socratic method is to humiliate, shame, and perplex participants. It clarifies pedagogical and exegetical confusions surrounding the Socratic method, what the Socratic method is, what its epistemological ambitions are, and how the historical Socrates likely viewed it. First, this article explains the Socratic method; second, it clarifies a misunderstanding regarding Socrates' role in intentionally perplexing his interlocutors; third, it discusses two different types of perplexity and relates these to (...)
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  14. Anthony Hooper (2011). The Philosopher's Stories: The Role of Myth in Plato's Pedagogy. The European Legacy 15 (7):843-853.score: 66.0
    In this essay I will argue that Platonic myths are a useful tool not only in the education of the ignorant but for the philosophical mind as well. To do this I will first examine the limitations and problems that Plato sees in written communication, and I will then argue that myths avoid these problems by undermining their own validity. If they are to avoid the problems that plague the written format, myths must show themselves for what they are: (...)
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  15. Maria Duffy (2012). Paul Ricoeur's Pedagogy of Pardon: A Narrative Theory of Memory and Forgetting. Continuum.score: 66.0
    Situating narrative: philosophical and theological context -- Ethical being: the storied self as moral agent -- Reconciled being: narrative and pardon -- Pedagogies of pardon in praxis -- Towards a narrative pedagogy of reconciliation -- Ricoeur's legacy: A Praxis of Peace.
     
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  16. Sam Butchart, Toby Handfield & Greg Restall (2009). Teaching Philosophy, Logic and Critical Thinking Using Peer Instruction. Teaching Philosophy (1):1-40.score: 60.0
    Peer Instruction (or PI for short) is a simple and effective technique you can use to make lectures more interactive, more engaging, and more effective learning experiences.
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  17. Michael Ehrmantraut (2010). Heidegger's Philosophic Pedagogy. Continuum.score: 60.0
    Introduction -- The practice of philosophy -- The pedagogical character of philosophic practice -- The problem of the beginning -- The new pedagogy of the lecture courses -- Fundamental ontology and metaphysics -- Philosophic pedagogy and spiritual leadership -- Education and politics -- Heidegger's introduction to philosophy -- The task of introduction : Einleitung in die Philosophie -- Philosophy and the essence of man -- Heidegger's students -- The crisis of academic studies -- Towards a living philosophizing -- (...)
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  18. Kevin J. Harrelson (2012). Narrative Pedagogy for Introduction to Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):113-141.score: 54.0
    This essay offers a rationale for the employment of narrative pedagogies in introductory philosophy courses, as well as examples of narrative techniques, assignments, and course design that have been successfully employed in the investigation of philosophical topics. My hope is to undercut the sense that “telling stories in class” is just a playful diversion from the real material, and to encourage instructors to treat storytelling as a genuine philosophical activity that should be rigorously developed. I argue that introductory (...)
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  19. Beth Johnson (2009). Masochism and the Mother, Pedagogy and Perversion. Angelaki 14 (3):117 – 130.score: 54.0
    (2009). Masochism and The Mother, Pedagogy and Perversion. Angelaki: Vol. 14, shadows of cruelty sadism, masochism and the philosophical muse – part one, pp. 117-130.
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  20. Donnie Self (1988). The Pedagogy of Two Different Approaches to Humanistic Medical Education: Cognitive Vs Affective. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (2).score: 54.0
    The enormous growth in medical humanities programs during the past decade has resulted in an extensive literature concerning the content of the discipline and the issues that have been addressed. Comparatively little attention, however, has been devoted to the structure of the discipline of medical humanities concerning the process or the theoretical aspects of the pedagogy of teaching the discipline. This report explicitly addresses the pedagogical aspects of the discipline by comparing and contrasting two different basic approaches to the (...)
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  21. Nadia Kennedy & David Kennedy (2011). Community of Philosophical Inquiry as a Discursive Structure, and its Role in School Curriculum Design. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):265-283.score: 54.0
    This article traces the development of the theory and practice of what is known as ‘community of inquiry’ as an ideal of classroom praxis. The concept has ancient and uncertain origins, but was seized upon as a form of pedagogy by the originators of the Philosophy for Children program in the 1970s. Its location at the intersection of the discourses of argumentation theory, communications theory, semiotics, systems theory, dialogue theory, learning theory and group psychodynamics makes of it a rich (...)
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  22. William F. Lawhead (2010). The Philosophical Journey: An Interactive Approach. Mcgraw-Hill Higher Education.score: 54.0
    The Philosophical Journey: An Interactive Approach , is a text/reader which enhances comprehension of philosophical study by allowing the reader to ponder, explore and actively participate in the learning process. Philosophy becomes a personal journey to students through Bill Lawhead's innovative and unique pedagogy which delivers philosophical concepts through more digestible chunks.
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  23. John Quay (2012). Heidegger's Philosophic Pedagogy – By M. Ehrmantraut. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):571-575.score: 50.0
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  24. Samuel D. Rocha (2012). Heidegger's Philosophic Pedagogy – By M. Ehrmantraut. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):568-570.score: 50.0
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  25. Sina Kramer (2012). Continental and Feminist Philosophical Pedagogies: Conditions. Philosophia 2 (1):68-71.score: 50.0
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  26. Beyers Nel & F. C. (1970). Some Aspects of Adulthood as Seen in Philosophical-Pedagogical Perspective with Reference to the Zulu's New Image in Man. [Stellenbosch]University of Zululand.score: 50.0
     
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  27. Dawn C. Riley (2011). Heidegger Teaching: An Analysis and Interpretation of Pedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (8):797-815.score: 48.0
    German philosopher Martin Heidegger stirred educators when in 1951 he claimed teaching is more difficult than learning because teachers must ‘learn to let learn’. However in the main he left the aphorism unexplained as part of a brief four-paragraph, less than two-page set of observations concerning the relationship of teaching to learning; and concluded at the end of those observations that to become a teacher is an ‘exalted matter’. This paper investigates both of Heidegger's claims, interpreting letting learn in the (...)
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  28. Ingo Brigandt (2013). Intelligent Design and the Nature of Science: Philosophical and Pedagogical Points. In Kostas Kampourakis (ed.), The Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer.score: 42.0
    This chapter offers a critique of intelligent design arguments against evolution and a philosophical discussion of the nature of science, drawing several lessons for the teaching of evolution and for science education in general. I discuss why Behe’s irreducible complexity argument fails, and why his portrayal of organismal systems as machines is detrimental to biology education and any under-standing of how organismal evolution is possible. The idea that the evolution of complex organismal features is too unlikely to have occurred (...)
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  29. Thomas A. Nadelhoffer & Eddy Nahmias (2008). Polling as Pedagogy. Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):39-59.score: 42.0
    First, we briefly familiarize the reader with the nascent field of "experimental philosophy," in which philosophers use empirical methods, rather than armchair speculation, to ascertain laypersons' intuitions about philosophical issues. Second, we discuss how the surveys used by experimental philosophers can serve as valuable pedagogical tools for teaching philosophy-independently of whether one believes surveying laypersons is an illuminating approach to doing philosophy. Giving students surveys that contain questions and thought experiments from philosophical debates gets them to actively engage (...)
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  30. Oren Ergas (2013). Overcoming the Philosophy/Life, Body/Mind Rift: Demonstrating Yoga as Embodied-Lived-Philosophical-Practice. Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (1):1-13.score: 42.0
  31. Fred Dallmayr (2006). An End to Evil? Philosophical and Political Reflections. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):169 - 186.score: 42.0
    After a long period of neglect and complacency, the problem of evil has powerfully resurfaced in our time. Two events above all have triggered this resurgence: the atrocities of totalitarianism (summarized under the label of "Auschwitz") and the debacle of September 11 and its aftermath. Following September 11, a "war on terror" has been unleashed and some writers have advocated an all-out assault on, and military victory over, evil. Taking issue with this proposal, the paper first of all examines the (...)
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  32. Thomas Nadelhoffer & Eddy Nahmias (2008). Polling as Pedagogy: Experimental Philosophy as a Valuable Tool for Teaching Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):39-58.score: 42.0
    First, we briefly familiarize the reader with the emerging field of “experimental philosophy,” in which philosophers use empirical methods, rather than armchair speculation, to ascertain laypersons’ intuitions about philosophical issues. Second, we discuss how the surveys used by experimental philosophers can serve as valuable pedagogical tools for teaching philosophy—independently of whether one believes surveying laypersons is an illuminating approach to doing philosophy. Giving students surveys that contain questions and thought experiments from philosophical debates gets them to actively engage (...)
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  33. B. Clarke (2012). From Information to Cognition: The Systems Counterculture, Heinz von Foerster's Pedagogy, and Second-Order Cybernetics. Constructivist Foundations 7 (3):196-207.score: 42.0
    Context: In this empirical and conceptual paper on the historical, philosophical, and epistemological backgrounds of second-order cybernetics, the emergence of a significant pedagogical component to Heinz von Foerster’s work during the last years of the Biological Computer Laboratory is placed against the backdrop of social and intellectual movements on the American landscape. Problem: Previous discussion in this regard has focused largely on the student radicalism of the later 1960s. A wider-angled view of the American intellectual counterculture is needed. However, (...)
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  34. Derek Malone-France (2008). Composition Pedagogy and the Philosophy Curriculum. Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):59-86.score: 42.0
    This essay extends the recent trend toward greater emphasis on writing-related pedagogical practices in introductory philosophy courses to upper-division courses, providing a holistic model for course design that centers on certain techniques and practices that have been developed in the context of the new wave of multidisciplinary writing programs in the United States. I argue that instructors can more effectively teach philosophy and encourage philosophical thinking by incorporating the methods of writing instruction into their courses in systematic ways and (...)
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  35. Harry Lesser (1982). Style and Pedagogy in Plato and Aristotle. Philosophy 57 (221):388 - 394.score: 42.0
    This article argues that plato's choice of the dialogue as a vehicle for his philosophy and aristotle's choice of an objective compressed lecturing style (in his later works) has less to do with differences in philosophical doctrine and more with differences in pedagogic aim. Plato aimed at teaching pupils to begin thinking and to keep re-examining the foundations of their thought, aristotle at advancing the sum of human knowledge. This in its turn, it is argued, was connected with a (...)
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  36. Larisa Titonova (2008). Philosophical Aspects of Balance Between Tolerance and Manipulation in High School Pedagogical Technologies. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:363-370.score: 42.0
    The emerging of new virtual studying cyberspace significantly broadens the scope of pedagogical techniques and created new opportunities for usage of manipulative techniques in educational practice Manipulation success factor is mostly depends on the tolerance level of a student-addressee when recognizing manipulation intrusion. There are three main moods of student-addressee’s behaviour in manipulation situation: active anti-manipulation defence, related to building effective contramanipulation; passive anti-manipulation defence, including applying different methods of operational and behavioural blocking ofmanipulator’s actions; and high level of tolerance, (...)
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