Search results for 'Philosophy Computer network resources' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter J. King (199u). Philosophy Around the Web. S.N..score: 111.0
     
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  2. Patrick John Coppock, Graeme Kirkpatrick, Olli Tapio Leino & Anita Leirfall (forthcoming). Introduction to the Special Issue on the Philosophy of Computer Games. Philosophy and Technology:1-7.score: 75.0
    The seven articles that constitute this special issue illustrate scholarly interactions between philosophy and game studies. The wide range of game types/genres and the multiple philosophical issues concerning them are rich and productive. They indicate well the significant contribution that philosophical approaches can make to further development of scholarly understandings of computer games and gaming. Each article breaks new conceptual ground in ways likely to resonate within the new discipline of computer game studies but also, beyond this, (...)
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  3. Darren Abramson (2011). Philosophy of Mind Is (in Part) Philosophy of Computer Science. Minds and Machines 21 (2):203-219.score: 72.0
    In this paper I argue that whether or not a computer can be built that passes the Turing test is a central question in the philosophy of mind. Then I show that the possibility of building such a computer depends on open questions in the philosophy of computer science: the physical Church-Turing thesis and the extended Church-Turing thesis. I use the link between the issues identified in philosophy of mind and philosophy of (...) science to respond to a prominent argument against the possibility of building a machine that passes the Turing test. Finally, I respond to objections against the proposed link between questions in the philosophy of mind and philosophy of computer science. (shrink)
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  4. Pete Mandik (2002). Synthetic Neuroethology. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 11-29.score: 67.0
    Computation and philosophy intersect three times in this essay. Computation is considered as an object, as a method, and as a model used in a certain line of philosophical inquiry concerning the relation of mind to matter. As object, the question considered is whether computation and related notions of mental representation constitute the best ways to conceive of how physical systems give rise to mental properties. As method and model, the computational techniques of artificial life and embodied evolutionary connectionism (...)
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  5. Klaus Mainzer (1999). Computational Models and Virtual Reality. New Perspectives of Research in Chemistry. Hyle 5 (2):135 - 144.score: 66.5
    Molecular models are typical topics of chemical research depending on the technical standards of observation, computation, and representation. Mathematically, molecular structures have been represented by means of graph theory, topology, differential equations, and numerical procedures. With the increasing capabilities of computer networks, computational models and computer-assisted visualization become an essential part of chemical research. Object-oriented programming languages create a virtual reality of chemical structures opening new avenues of exploration and collaboration in chemistry. From an epistemic point of view, (...)
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  6. Tibor Bosse, Martijn C. Schut & Jan Treur (2009). Formal Analysis of Dynamics Within Philosophy of Mind by Computer Simulation. Minds and Machines 19 (4):543-555.score: 63.0
    Computer simulations can be useful tools to support philosophers in validating their theories, especially when these theories concern phenomena showing nontrivial dynamics. Such theories are usually informal, whilst for computer simulation a formally described model is needed. In this paper, a methodology is proposed to gradually formalise philosophical theories in terms of logically formalised dynamic properties. One outcome of this process is an executable logic-based temporal specification, which within a dedicated software environment can be used as a simulation (...)
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  7. Raymond Turner, The Philosophy of Computer Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 63.0
  8. Dominic Lopes (2009). A Philosophy of Computer Art. Routledge.score: 63.0
    The machine in the ghost -- A computer art form -- Live wires: computing interaction -- Work to rule -- Artist to audience -- Computer art poetics -- Atari to art -- Envoi.
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  9. Jordi Vallverdú (ed.) (2010). Thinking Machines and the Philosophy of Computer Science: Concepts and Principles. Information Science Reference.score: 61.0
  10. William J. Rapaport (2005). Philosophy of Computer Science. Teaching Philosophy 28 (4):319-341.score: 57.0
    There are many branches of philosophy called “the philosophy of X,” where X = disciplines ranging from history to physics. The philosophy of artificial intelligence has a long history, and there are many courses and texts with that title. Surprisingly, the philosophy of computer science is not nearly as well-developed. This article proposes topics that might constitute the philosophy of computer science and describes a course covering those topics, along with suggested readings and (...)
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  11. Herman T. Tavani (2001). The State of Computer Ethics as a Philosophical Field of Inquiry: Some Contemporary Perspectives, Future Projections, and Current Resources. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):97-108.score: 54.0
    The present article focusesupon three aspects of computer ethics as aphilosophical field: contemporary perspectives,future projections, and current resources.Several topics are covered, including variouscomputer ethics methodologies, the `uniqueness'of computer ethics questions, and speculationsabout the impact of globalization and theinternet. Also examined is the suggestion thatcomputer ethics may `disappear' in the future.Finally, there is a brief description ofcomputer ethics resources, such as journals,textbooks, conferences and associations.
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  12. G. Crocco, Luis Fariñas del Cerro & Andreas Herzig (eds.) (1995). Conditionals: From Philosophy to Computer Science. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    This book looks at the ways in which conditionals, an integral part of philosophy and logic, can be of practical use in computer programming. It analyzes the different types of conditionals, including their applications and potential problems. Other topics include defeasible logics, the Ramsey test, and a unified view of consequence relation and belief revision. Its implications will be of interest to researchers in logic, philosophy, and computer science, particularly artificial intelligence.
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  13. Roberta L. Millstein, History and Philosophy of Biology Resources.score: 52.5
    Links relating to the history and philosophy of biology, assembled by Roberta L. Millstein: reference works, societies, journals, historians and philosophers of biology with papers online, blogs, other resources in the history and philosophy of biology.
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  14. Eric Winsberg (2009). Computer Simulation and the Philosophy of Science. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):835-845.score: 51.0
    There are a variety of topics in the philosophy of science that need to be rethought, in varying degrees, after one pays careful attention to the ways in which computer simulations are used in the sciences. There are a number of conceptual issues internal to the practice of computer simulation that can benefit from the attention of philosophers. This essay surveys some of the recent literature on simulation from the perspective of the philosophy of science and (...)
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  15. Nenad Miscevic (2001). Science, Commonsense and Philosophy: A Defense of Continuity (a Critique of "Network Apriorism"). International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):19 – 31.score: 51.0
    A popular line in philosophy championed by Jackson and his followers analyses concepts as networks of propositions. It takes even network-propositions characterizing ordinary empirically applicable concepts to be a priori, in contrast to statements of empirical science. This is meant to guarantee both the autonomy of conceptual analysis, and its substantial and informative character. It is argued here, to the contrary, that empirically applicable and entrenched concepts owe the acceptability of their own network precisely to its empirical (...)
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  16. William J. Rapaport (2005). Philosophy of Computer Science : An Introductory Course Philosophy of Computer Science : An Introductory Course. Teaching Philosophy 28 (4):319-341.score: 51.0
    There are many branches of philosophy called "the philosophy of X," where X = disciplines ranging from history to physics. The philosophy of artificial intelligence has a long history, and there are many courses and texts with that title. Surprisingly, the philosophy of computer science is not nearly as well-developed. This article proposes topics that might constitute the philosophy of computer science and describes a course covering those topics, along with suggested readings and (...)
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  17. Wendy Parker (2012). Computer Simulation and Philosophy of Science. Metascience 21 (1):111-114.score: 48.0
    Computer simulation and philosophy of science Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9567-8 Authors Wendy S. Parker, Department of Philosophy, Ellis Hall 202, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  18. Luciano Floridi (1999). Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 48.0
    This accessible book explores the development, history and future of Information and Communication Technology using examples from philosophy. Luciano Floridi offers both an introduction to these technologies and a philosophical analysis of the problems they pose. The book examines a wide range of areas of technology, including the digital revolution, the Web and Internet, Artificial Intelligence and CD-ROMS. We see how the relationship between philosophy and computing provokes many crucial philosophical questions. Ultimately, Philosophy and Computing outlines what (...)
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  19. Marcel Sarot, Michael Scott & Maarten Wisse (2000). Philosophy of Religion: A Critical Survey of Internet Resources. Religious Studies 36 (3):355-366.score: 48.0
    In a survey of Internet resources available to philosophers of religion, the authors critically discuss philosophy sites, e-journals, virtual libraries etc that are relevant to philosophy of religion. They conclude that the Internet is increasingly becoming a helpful and even indispensable source of information.
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  20. Patrick Grim (2002). Philosophy for Computers: Some Explorations in Philosophical Modeling. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 181-209.score: 48.0
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  21. Daniel Fallman (2010). A Different Way of Seeing: Albert Borgmann's Philosophy of Technology and Human–Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (1):53-60.score: 48.0
    Traditional human–computer interaction (HCI) allowed researchers and practitioners to share and rely on the ‘five E’s’ of usability, the principle that interactive systems should be designed to be effective, efficient, engaging, error tolerant, and easy to learn. A recent trend in HCI, however, is that academic researchers as well as practitioners are becoming increasingly interested in user experiences, i.e., understanding and designing for relationships between users and artifacts that are for instance affective, engaging, fun, playable, sociable, creative, involving, meaningful, (...)
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  22. K. Abriszewski (2008). Notes Towards Uniting Actor-Network Theory and Josef Mitterer's Non-Dualizing Philosophy. Constructivist Foundations 3 (3):192-200.score: 48.0
    Purpose: To show the convergences between Josef Mitterer's non-dualizing way of speaking and actor-network theory. Method: Comparative analysis of Mitterer's non-dualizing philosophy and actor-network philosophy. Findings: Profound convergences between the two accounts may lead to a unified account that could redefine traditional philosophical problems. Benefits: The paper extends the range of Mitterer's non-dualizing philosophy and actor-network theory enabling both to face new problems. Among them, extended non-dualizing philosophy may undergo empirical investigations.
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  23. Leslie Burkholder (ed.) (1992). Philosophy and the Computer. Westview Press.score: 48.0
  24. Amnon Eden (2011). Some Philosophical Issues in Computer Science. Minds and Machines 21 (2):123-133.score: 45.0
    The essays included in the special issue dedicated to the philosophy of computer science examine new philosophical questions that arise from reflection upon conceptual issues in computer science and the insights such an enquiry provides into ongoing philosophical debates.
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  25. Aaron Sloman (1978). The Computer Revolution in Philosophy: Philosophy Science and Models of Mind. Harvester.score: 45.0
    Since 1991 the author has been Professor of Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science in the School of Computer Science at the University of Birmingham, UK.
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  26. Charles Ess (2008). Luciano Floridi's Philosophy of Information and Information Ethics: Critical Reflections and the State of the Art. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):89-96.score: 45.0
    I describe the emergence of Floridi’s philosophy of information (PI) and information ethics (IE) against the larger backdrop of Information and Computer Ethics (ICE). Among their many strengths, PI and IE offer promising metaphysical and ethical frameworks for a global ICE that holds together globally shared norms with the irreducible differences that define local cultural and ethical traditions. I then review the major defenses and critiques of PI and IE offered by contributors to this special issue, and highlight (...)
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  27. Paul Thagard (2009). Why Cognitive Science Needs Philosophy and Vice Versa. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):237-254.score: 45.0
    Contrary to common views that philosophy is extraneous to cognitive science, this paper argues that philosophy has a crucial role to play in cognitive science with respect to generality and normativity. General questions include the nature of theories and explanations, the role of computer simulation in cognitive theorizing, and the relations among the different fields of cognitive science. Normative questions include whether human thinking should be Bayesian, whether decision making should maximize expected utility, and how norms should (...)
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  28. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 45.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
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  29. Anthony F. Beavers, Luciano Floridi, Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction, Routledge, 1999.score: 45.0
    Luciano Floridi’s Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction is a survey of some important ideas that ground the newly emerging area of philosophy known, thanks to Floridi, as the philosophy of information. It was written as a textbook for philosophy students interested in the digital age, but is probably more useful for postgraduates who want to investigate intersections between philosophy and computer science, information theory and ICT (information and communications technology). The book is divided into (...)
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  30. Michael H. G. Hoffmann (forthcoming). Changing Philosophy Through Technology: Complexity and Computer-Supported Collaborative Argument Mapping. Philosophy and Technology:1-22.score: 45.0
    Technology is not only an object of philosophical reflection but also something that can change this reflection. This paper discusses the potential of computer-supported argument visualization tools for coping with the complexity of philosophical arguments. I will show, in particular, how the interactive and web-based argument mapping software “AGORA-net” can change the practice of philosophical reflection, communication, and collaboration. AGORA-net allows the graphical representation of complex argumentations in logical form and the synchronous and asynchronous collaboration on those “argument maps” (...)
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  31. Christopher Norris (1997). Resources of Realism: Prospects for 'Post-Analytic' Philosophy. St. Martin's Press.score: 45.0
    This book is concerned chiefly with issues in epistemology, philosophical semantics and philosophy of science. It defends a causal-realist approach to theories and explanations in the natural sciences and a truth-based propositional semantics for natural language derived from various sources, among them unusually in this context the work of William Empson. It argues against various forms of anti-realist doctrine with regard to both the truth-claims of science and the construal of intentions, meanings and beliefs in the process of linguistic (...)
     
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  32. Fumi Kitagawa (2010). Pooling Resources for Excellence and Relevance: An Evolution of Universities as Multi-Scalar Network Organisations. [REVIEW] Minerva 48 (2):169-187.score: 44.0
    There are a number of different forms of inter-organisational collaborative arrangements between universities at international, national and sub-national levels. This paper focuses on a particular form of inter-university collaboration mechanisms, which represents one of the key recent policy developments in Scotland. Research pooling initiatives are a regional response to create international research excellence and regional relevance by ‘pooling’ specific areas of research excellences that are seen to be of strategic importance to Scotland universities across the region. Research pooling initiatives as (...)
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  33. Sandra G. Harding (2004). A Socially Relevant Philosophy of Science? Resources From Standpoint Theory's Controversiality. Hypatia 19 (1):25-47.score: 43.5
    : Feminist standpoint theory remains highly controversial: it is widely advocated, used to guide research and justify its results, and yet is also vigorously denounced. This essay argues that three such sites of controversy reveal the value of engaging with standpoint theory as a way of reflecting on and debating some of the most anxiety-producing issues in contemporary Western intellectual and political life. Engaging with standpoint theory enables a socially relevant philosophy of science.
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  34. Mark C. Taylor (2001). The Moment of Complexity: Emerging Network Culture. University of Chicago Press.score: 42.0
    " The Moment of Complexity is a profoundly original work. In remarkable and insightful ways, Mark Taylor traces an entirely new way to view the evolution of our culture, detailing how information theory and the scientific concept of complexity can be used to understand recent developments in the arts and humanities. This book will ultimately be seen as a classic."-John L. Casti, Santa Fe Institute, author of Godel: A Life of Logic, the Mind, and Mathematics The science of complexity accounts (...)
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  35. Colin Koopman (2012). Pragmatist Resources for Experimental Philosophy: Inquiry in Place of Intuition. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (1):1-24.score: 42.0
    Recent attention given to the upstart movement of experimental philosophy is much deserved. But now that experimental philosophy is beginning to enter a stage of maturity, it is time to consider its relation to other philosophical traditions that have issued similar assaults against ingrained and potentially misguided philosophical habits. Experimental philosophy is widely known for rejecting a philosophical reliance on intuitions as evidence in philosophical argument. In this it shares much with another branch of empiricist philosophy, (...)
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  36. Amichai Kronfeld (1990). Reference and Computation: An Essay in Applied Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    This book deals with a major problem in the study of language: the problem of reference. The ease with which we refer to things in conversation is deceptive. Upon closer scrutiny, it turns out that we hardly ever tell each other explicitly what object we mean, although we expect our interlocutor to discern it. Amichai Kronfeld provides an answer to two questions associated with this: how do we successfully refer, and how can a computer be programmed to achieve this? (...)
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  37. Albert A. Bell (1991). Resources in Ancient Philosophy: An Annotated Bibliography of Scholarship in English, 1965-1989. Scarecrow Press.score: 42.0
  38. Ron Barnette (1998). Using Computer Technology for Teaching Philosophy. In Terrell Ward Bynum & James Moor (eds.), The Digital Phoenix: How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers. 393.score: 42.0
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  39. Verification Debate (1998). Philosophy and Computer Science: Reflections on the Program. In Terrell Ward Bynum & James Moor (eds.), The Digital Phoenix: How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers. 253.score: 42.0
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  40. James H. Fetzer (1998). Philosophy and Computer Science: Reflections on the Program Verification Debate. In Terrell Ward Bynum & James Moor (eds.), The Digital Phoenix: How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers. 253--73.score: 42.0
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  41. Soraj Hongladarom (ed.) (2007). Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Pub..score: 42.0
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  42. Peter Kuhnlein (2005). Computer Science as a Subject Matter for Philosophy of Science. In. In L. Magnani & R. Dossena (eds.), Computing, Philosophy and Cognition. 4--113.score: 42.0
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  43. Yaroslav Shramko & Heinrich Wansing (2005). Some Useful 16-Valued Logics: How a Computer Network Should Think. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (2):121 - 153.score: 41.5
    In Belnap's useful 4-valued logic, the set 2 = {T, F} of classical truth values is generalized to the set 4 = (2) = {Ø, {T}, {F}, {T, F}}. In the present paper, we argue in favor of extending this process to the set 16 = ᵍ (4) (and beyond). It turns out that this generalization is well-motivated and leads from the bilattice FOUR₂ with an information and a truth-and-falsity ordering to another algebraic structure, namely the trilattice SIXTEEN₃ with an (...)
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  44. Todd Hughes & Oleg Sheyner (2003). Attack Scenario Graphs for Computer Network Threat Analysis and Prediction. Complexity 9 (2):15-18.score: 40.5
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  45. P. Munro (1996). Shared Network Resources and Shared Task Properties. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 40.5
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  46. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2003). Shifting the Paradigm of Philosophy of Science: Philosophy of Information and a New Renaissance. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 13 (4):521-536.score: 39.0
    Computing is changing the traditional field of Philosophy of Science in a very profound way. First as a methodological tool, computing makes possible ``experimental Philosophy'' which is able to provide practical tests for different philosophical ideas. At the same time the ideal object of investigation of the Philosophy of Science is changing. For a long period of time the ideal science was Physics (e.g., Popper, Carnap, Kuhn, and Chalmers). Now the focus is shifting to the field of (...)
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  47. Luciano Floridi (2004). Open Problems in the Philosophy of Information. Metaphilosophy 35 (4):554-582.score: 39.0
    The philosophy of information (PI) is a new area of research with its own field of investigation and methodology. This article, based on the Herbert A. Simon Lecture of Computing and Philosophy I gave at Carnegie Mellon University in 2001, analyses the eighteen principal open problems in PI. Section 1 introduces the analysis by outlining Herbert Simon's approach to PI. Section 2 discusses some methodological considerations about what counts as a good philosophical problem. The discussion centers on Hilbert's (...)
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  48. Luciano Floridi (2002). What is the Philosophy of Information? In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 123-145.score: 39.0
  49. Matti Tedre (2011). Computing as a Science: A Survey of Competing Viewpoints. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (3):361-387.score: 39.0
    Since the birth of computing as an academic discipline, the disciplinary identity of computing has been debated fiercely. The most heated question has concerned the scientific status of computing. Some consider computing to be a natural science and some consider it to be an experimental science. Others argue that computing is bad science, whereas some say that computing is not a science at all. This survey article presents viewpoints for and against computing as a science. Those viewpoints are analyzed against (...)
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  50. Erik J. Olsson & Aron Vallinder (2013). Norms of Assertion and Communication in Social Networks. Synthese 190 (13):2557-2571.score: 39.0
    Epistemologists can be divided into two camps: those who think that nothing short of certainty or (subjective) probability 1 can warrant assertion and those who disagree with this claim. This paper addressed this issue by inquiring into the problem of setting the probability threshold required for assertion in such a way that that the social epistemic good is maximized, where the latter is taken to be the veritistic value in the sense of Goldman (Knowledge in a social world, 1999). We (...)
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