Search results for 'Philosophy Introductions' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Jonathan Westphal (1998). Philosophical Propositions: An Introduction to Philosophy. Routledge.score: 108.0
    Philosophical Propositions provides a fresh and lucid introduction to key philosophical problems in a classic style. Designed for students coming to philosophy for the first time, Jonathan Westphal introduces readers to the key problems in philosophy, encouraging them to work through those problems themselves. Each chapter considers a key philosophical problem: The Nature of a Philosophical Problem; Basic Concepts of Logic and Philosophy; The Problem of Evil; The Existence of God; Reality; Certainty; Time; Personal Identity; The Mind-Body (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jenny Teichman & Graham White (eds.) (1995). An Introduction to Modern European Philosophy. St. Martin's Press.score: 108.0
    An Introduction to Modern European Philosophy , contains scholarly but accessible essays by nine British academics on Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Maritain, Hannah Arendt, Habermas, Foucault, and the 'Events' of 1968. Written for English-speaking readers, it describes the varied traditions within 19th- and 20th-century European philosophy, reflecting the dynamism and plurality within the European tradition and presenting opposing points of view. It deals with both French and German philosophers, plus Kierkegaard, and (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thomas Nagel (1987). What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 102.0
    Should the hard questions of philosophy matter to ordinary people? In this down-to-earth, nonhistorical guide, Thomas Nagel, the distinguished author of Mortal Questions and The View From Nowhere, brings philosophical problems to life, revealing in vivid, accessible prose why they have continued to fascinate and baffle thinkers across the centuries. Arguing that the best way to learn about philosophy is to tackle its problems head-on, Nagel turns to some of the most important questions we can ask about ourselves. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Antony Flew (1989). An Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ideas and Argument From Plato to Popper. Thames and Hudson.score: 96.0
  5. Anthony Appiah (1989). Necessary Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy. Prentice-Hall.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Joseph Agassi (1990). An Introduction to Philosophy: The Siblinghood of Humanity. Caravan Books.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Joseph Agassi (1991). The Siblinghood of Humanity: An Introduction to Philosophy. Caravan Books.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Max Hocutt (1986). First Philosophy: An Introduction to Philisophical Issues. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. R. J. Hollingdale (1993). Western Philosophy: An Introduction. Kahn & Averill.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Thomas Koenig (1985). Human Existence and Philosophical Experience: An Introduction to Philosophy. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jacques Maritain (1930/1989). An Introduction to Philosophy. Christian Classics.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Roger Scruton (1994/1995). Modern Philosophy: An Introduction and Survey. Allen Lane Penguin Press.score: 96.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Daniel J. Sullivan (1964). An Introduction to Philosophy. Milwaukee, Bruce Pub. Co..score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Engelbert Johannes Van Croonenburg (1971/1982). Gateway to Reality: An Introduction to Philosophy. University Press of America.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Arthur Coleman Danto (1997). Connections to the World: The Basic Concepts of Philosophy. University of California Press.score: 90.0
    Arthur C. Danto's lucid introduction to the central topics of Western philosophical thought remains an unparalleled guide to problems in metaphysics and epistemology that have engaged philosophers for several millennia. Examining the work of Plato, Berkeley, Descartes, Hume, and Wittgenstein, Danto explores debates about empiricism, the mind/body problem, the nature of matter, and the status of language, consciousness, and scientific explanation. In a new preface to this edition he considers the current relationship between philosophy and the humanities.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Nigel Warburton (ed.) (1999). Philosophy: The Basic Readings. Routledge.score: 90.0
    This is the ideal introduction to key philosophical texts for students. Nigel Warburton brings philosophy to life with an imaginative selection of philosophical writings on key topics. Each chapter considers a key area of philosophy, complementing the sections in Philosophy: The Basics with a selection of readings.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Karen Warren (2008). Gendering the History of Western Philosophy: Pairs of Men and Women Philosophers From the 4th Century B.C.E. To the Present, with Lead Essay, Chapter Introductions, and Commentaries. [REVIEW] Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc..score: 84.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Martin Hollis (1985). Invitation to Philosophy. Blackwell.score: 78.0
    In this revised and updated edition of a classic introductory text, Martin Hollis leads his readers through the age-old philosophical questions of free choice ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. N. Scott Arnold, Theodore M. Benditt & George Graham (eds.) (1998). Philosophy Then and Now. Blackwell Publishers.score: 78.0
    This is followed by key selections from the essential writings of that philosopher, as well as influential selections from contemporary figures.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jenny Teichman (1999). Philosophy: A Beginner's Guide. Blackwell Publishers.score: 78.0
    This edition includes a new chapter on scepticism.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Richard H. Popkin (1993). Philosophy Made Simple. Doubleday.score: 78.0
    For almost four decades, Made Simple books have set the standard for continuing education and home study. In answer to the changing needsof today's marketplace, the Made Simple series for the '90s presents a thoroughly up-to-the-minute portfolio of skills, information, and experience, with revised and updated editions of bestselling titles, plus a whole range of new subjects from personal finance to office management to desktop publishing. B & W illustrations throughout.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Brenda Almond (1996). Exploring Philosophy: The Philosophical Quest. Blackwell.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Peg Birmingham, James Campbell, Maria C. Cimitile, Elian P. Miller, Conal Condren, Stephen Gaukroger, Ian Hunter, John W. Cooper & M. I. Ada (forthcoming). Ambrosio, Franci J. Dante and Derrida Face to Face. Albany: SUNY Press, 2007. $75.00 Baggett, David and William A. Drrumin, Eds. Hitchock and Philosophy: Dail M for Metaphysics. Chicago: Open Court, 2007. $17.95 Pb. Bird, Colin. An Introduction to Political Philosophy. Cambridge Introductions to Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. $24.99 Pb. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today.score: 78.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Nicholas Capaldi (1981). An Invitation to Philosophy. Prometheus Books.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Stanley M. Honer (1982). Invitation to Philosophy: Issues and Options. Wadsworth.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. D. Z. Phillips (1996). Introducing Philosophy: The Challenge of Scepticism. Blackwell.score: 78.0
  27. Calvin Pinchin (1990). Issues in Philosophy. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jay F. Rosenberg (1984). The Practice of Philosophy: A Handbook for Beginners. Prentice-Hall.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Roger Scruton (1998). An Intelligent Person's Guide to Philosophy. A. Lane.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Siobhan Chapman (2000). Philosophy for Linguists: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 72.0
    Philosophy for Linguists provides students with a clear, concise introduction to the main topics in the philosophy of language. Focusing on what linguists need to know and how philosophy relates to modern linguistics, the book is structured around key branches of linguistics: semantics, pragmatics, and language acquisition. Assuming no prior knowledge of philosophy, Siobhan Chapman traces the history and development of ideas in the philosophy of language and outlines the contributions of specific philosophers. The book (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Rex Martin (2007). William A. Edmundson, an Introduction to Rights. Cambridge Introductions to Philosophy and Law Series (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), Pp. XV + 223. [REVIEW] Utilitas 19 (4):520-522.score: 72.0
  32. Ralph Schumacher (2000). John Heil, Philosophy of Mind. A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge Contemporary Introductions to Philosophy. Erkenntnis 53 (3):423-428.score: 72.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Louis P. Pojman & James Fieser (eds.) (2008). Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Now in a third edition, Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings is a highly acclaimed, topically organized collection that covers five major areas of philosophy--theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, freedom and determinism, and moral philosophy. Editor Louis P. Pojman enhances the text's topical organization by arranging the selections into a pro/con format to help students better understand opposing arguments. He also includes accessible introductions to each chapter, subsection, and individual (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Phil Washburn (1997). Philosophical Dilemmas: Building a Worldview. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Lucidly written, this extensive and very original introduction to philosophy features over fifty brief, jargon-free essays arranged in pairs. Each pair answers one of the principal philosophical questions, such as "Does God exist?" or "Are we free?", with two opposing points of view. On the topic of relativism, for example, one essay argues that morality is created by society and relative to it, while the other claims that moral standards are absolute and universal. Each essay takes a definite stand (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Patrick T. Mackenzie (1989). The Problems of Philosophers: An Introduction. Prometheus Books.score: 66.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. William L. Reese (1959/1988). The Ascent From Below: An Introduction to Philosophical Inquiry. University Press of America.score: 66.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Anthony F. Beavers (2009). The Phenomenological Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):533-537.score: 60.0
    The Phenomenological Mind, by Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, is part of a recent initiative to show that phenomenology, classically conceived as the tradition inaugurated by Edmund Husserl and not as mere introspection, contributes something important to cognitive science. (For other examples, see “References” below.) Phenomenology, of course, has been a part of cognitive science for a long time. It implicitly informs the works of Andy Clark (e.g. 1997) and John Haugeland (e.g. 1998), and Hubert Dreyfus explicitly uses it (e.g. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Hegel (2008). Hegel: Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion: Volume I: Introduction and the Concept of Religion. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Hegel Lectures Series Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson -/- Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Richard Dien Winfield (2011). Is Phenomenology Necessary as Introduction to Philosophy? The Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):279-298.score: 60.0
    Philosophy can begin neither by making claims about the given nor by investigating knowing, since, in either way, unjustified assumptions must be made. In the face of this predicament, Hegel presents his Phenomenology of Spirit as the only viable introduction to philosophy, introducing presuppositionless science by immanently critiquing the construal of knowing which presumes that cognition always has assumptions, always confronts some given. Can the challenge of completing this immanent critique in all its daunting complexity be avoided by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Markus Schrenk (2010). Mauro Dorato * The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (E-Version) 62 (1):225-232.score: 52.0
    This is a review of Mauro Dorato's book "The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature".
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Bo Mou (2010). On Constructive-Engagement Strategy of Comparative Philosophy: A Journal Theme Introduction [Abstract]. Comparative Philosophy 1 (1).score: 52.0
    In this journal theme introduction, first, I explain how comparative philosophy as explored in the journal Comparative Philosophy is understood and how it is intrinsically related to the constructive engagement strategy. Second, to characterize more clearly and accurately some related methodological points of the constructive-engagement strategy, and also to explain how constructive engagement is possible, I introduce some needed conceptual and explanatory resources and a meta-methodological framework and endeavor to identify adequacy conditions for methodological guiding principles in comparative (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2003). Theory and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 48.0
    How does science work? Does it tell us what the world is "really" like? What makes it different from other ways of understanding the universe? In Theory and Reality , Peter Godfrey-Smith addresses these questions by taking the reader on a grand tour of one hundred years of debate about science. The result is a completely accessible introduction to the main themes of the philosophy of science. Intended for undergraduates and general readers with no prior background in philosophy, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Simon Blackburn (1999). Think: A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
    Here at last is a coherent, unintimidating introduction to the challenging and fascinating landscape of Western philosophy. Written expressly for "anyone who believes there are big questions out there, but does not know how to approach them," Think provides a sound framework for exploring the most basic themes of philosophy, and for understanding how major philosophers have tackled the questions that have pressed themselves most forcefully on human consciousness. Simon Blackburn, author of the best-selling Oxford Dictionary of (...), begins by making a convincing case for the relevance of philosophy and goes on to give the reader a sense of how the great historical figures such as Plato, Hume, Kant, Descartes, and others have approached its central themes. In a lively and accessible style, Blackburn approaches the nature of human reflection and how we think, or can think, about knowledge, fate, ethics, identity, God, reason, and truth. Each chapter explains a major issue, and gives the reader a self-contained guide through the problems that the philosophers have studied. Because the text approaches these issues from the gound up, the untrained reader will emerge from its pages able to explore other philosophies with greater pleasure and understanding and be able to think--philosophically--for him or herself. Philosophy is often dismissed as a purely academic discipline with no relation to the "real" world non-philosophers are compelled to inhabit. Think dispels this myth and offers a springboard for all those who want to learn how the basic techniques of thinking shape virtually every aspect of our existence. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. David Carr (2003). Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching. Routledgefalmer.score: 48.0
    Making Sense of Education provides a contemporary introduction to the key issues in educational philosophy and theory. Exploring recent developments as well as important ideas from the twentieth century, this book aims to make philosophy of education relevant to everyday practice for teachers and student teachers, as well as those studying education as an academic subject.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. E. J. Lowe (2000). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    In this book Jonathan Lowe offers a lucid and wide-ranging introduction to the philosophy of mind. Using a problem-centred approach designed to stimulate as well as instruct, he begins with a general examination of the mind-body problem and moves on to detailed examination of more specific philosophical issues concerning sensation, perception, thought and language, rationality, artificial intelligence, action, personal identity and self-knowledge. His discussion is notably broad in scope, and distinctive in giving equal attention to deep metaphysical questions concerning (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bryan Magee (2000). The Great Philosophers: An Introduction to Western Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
    Beginning with the death of Socrates in 399 BC, and following the strand of philosophical inquiry through the centuries to recent figures such as Bertrand Russell and Wittgenstein, Bryan Magee's conversations with fifteen contemporary writers and philosophers provide an accessible and exciting account of Western philosophy and its greatest thinkers. With contributions from A. J. Ayer, Bernard Williams, Martha Nussbaum, Peter Singer, and John Searle, the book is not only an introduction to the philosophers of the past, but gives (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. T. W. Moore (1982). Philosophy of Education: An Introduction. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 48.0
    Philosophy and philosophy of education Introduction This book sets out to give a brief and elementary introduction to philosophy of education, a specialised ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Martin Hollis (1994). The Philosophy of Social Science: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    This textbook by Martin Hollis offers an exceptionally clear and concise introduction to the philosophy of social science. It examines questions which give rise to fundamental philosophical issues. Are social structures better conceived of as systems of laws and forces, or as webs of meanings and practices? Is social action better viewed as rational behaviour, or as self-expression? By exploring such questions, the reader is led to reflect upon the nature of scientific method in social science. Is the aim (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Samir Okasha (2002). Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
    What is science? Is there a real difference between science and myth? Is science objective? Can science explain everything? This Very Short Introduction provides a concise overview of the main themes of contemporary philosophy of science. Beginning with a short history of science to set the scene, Samir Okasha goes on to investigate the nature of scientific reasoning, scientific explanation, revolutions in science, and theories such as realism and anti-realism. He also looks at philosophical issues in particular sciences, including (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Christopher New (1999). Philosophy of Literature: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 48.0
    Literature, like the visual arts, poses its own philosophical problems. While literary theorists have discussed the nature of literature intensively, analytic philosophers have usually dealt with literary problems either within the general framework of aesthetics or else in a way that is accessible only to a philosophical audience. The present book is unique in that it introduces the philosophy of literature from an analytic perspective accessible to both students of literature and students of philosophy. Specifically, the book addresses: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000