Search results for 'Philosophy and science' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Gabriella Ujlaki (1994). Philosophy of Science in Hungary. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 25 (1):157 - 175.score: 90.0
    The report gives a survey of the Hungarian philosophy of science after 1973. The report throws some light on the history of Hungarian philosophy in the context of the political circumstances of the late sixties and seventies. It starts with the not so well-known history of 'persecution of philosophers' in 1973. Then it treats the emergence of the philosophy of science focussing on the most significant representatives of this branch of philosophy, which was up (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Thomas Mormann (2013). Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer. 423--434.score: 84.0
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Paul Hoyningen-Huene (1993). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 84.0
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Nicholas Maxwell (2002). The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (2):381-408.score: 84.0
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Stathis Psillos (2012). What is General Philosophy of Science? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):93-103.score: 84.0
    The very idea of a general philosophy of science relies on the assumption that there is this thing called science—as opposed to the various individual sciences. In this programmatic piece I make a case for the claim that general philosophy of science is the philosophy of science in general or science as such. Part of my narrative makes use of history, for two reasons. First, general philosophy of science is itself (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 84.0
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Philosophy, Science and Everything in Between. Philosophy Now 59:17-18.score: 84.0
    A few field notes from the philosophy of science meeting in Vancouver.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Philip Mirowski (2004). The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.score: 84.0
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge‘ is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy‘ are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1993). Philosophy of Science in Finland: 1970–1990. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 24 (1):147 - 167.score: 84.0
    This paper gives a survey of the philosophy of science in Finland during the two decades 1970-90. Topics covered include the background (earlier studies by Eino Kaila, G. H. von Wright, and Jaakko Hintikka), the main areas of research (inductive logic, probability, truthlikeness, scientific theory, theory change, scientific realism, explanation and action, foundations of special disciplines), and the cultural impact of science studies.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Dimitri Ginev (1992). Varianten der Kritischen WissenschaftstheorieVariants of Critical Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 23 (1):45-60.score: 84.0
    It is the purpose of this paper to represent an analysis of four variants of critical philosophy of science: the constructivistic methodology, the reflexion upon science from the viewpoint of the critical theory of society, the ‘social natural science’ as a further development of the finalization conception, and the projective philosophy of science. Special attention is paid to the comparison of these variants. Some points of convergence as well as of divergence among them are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Lydia Patton (ed.) (2014). Philosophy, Science, and History: A Guide and Reader. Routledge.score: 84.0
    Philosophy, Science, and History: A Guide and Reader is a compact overview of HOPOS that aims to introduce students to the groundwork of the field, but also to stimulate innovative research. The original introduction focuses on scientific theory change, assessment, discovery, and pursuit. Part I of the Reader begins with classic texts in the history of logical empiricism, including Reichenbach's discovery-justification distinction. With careful reference to Kuhn's analysis of scientific revolutions, the section provides key texts analyzing the relationship (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Joachim Stolz (1996). Bericht: 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science (August 19–25, 1995; Florence, Italy). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 27 (1):167-170.score: 84.0
    The International Union of History and Philosophy of Science organizing the 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science is at its cross-road: the alternative is mass-performance or creative exchange of ideas. The program is criticized because the thematic center in History and Philosophy of Science has been shifted too far into the realm of micro-fields of Logic and the time reduction for presentation and discussion of papers to 20 minutes should be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Till Grüne-Yanoff (2014). Teaching Philosophy of Science to Scientists: Why, What and How. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 4 (1):115-134.score: 84.0
    This paper provides arguments to philosophers, scientists, administrators and students for why science students should be instructed in a mandatory, custom-designed, interdisciplinary course in the philosophy of science. The argument begins by diagnosing that most science students are taught only conventional methodology: a fixed set of methods whose justification is rarely addressed. It proceeds by identifying seven benefits that scientists incur from going beyond these conventions and from acquiring abilities to analyse and evaluate justifications of scientific (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Rein Vihalemm & Peeter Müürsepp (2007). Philosophy of Science in Estonia. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 38 (1):167 - 191.score: 84.0
    This paper presents a survey of the philosophy of science in Estonia. Topics covered include the historical background (science at the 17th century Academia Gustaviana, in the 19th century, during the Soviet period) and an overview of the current situation and main areas of research (the problem of demarcation, a critique of the traditional understandings of science, φ-science, classical and non-classical science, the philosophy of chemistry, the problem of induction, the sociology of scientific (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Francesca Bordogna (2008). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.score: 81.0
    At Columbia University in 1906, William James gave a highly confrontational speech to the American Philosophical Association (APA). He ignored the technical philosophical questions the audience had gathered to discuss and instead addressed the topic of human energy. Tramping on the rules of academic decorum, James invoked the work of amateurs, read testimonials on the benefits of yoga and alcohol, and concluded by urging his listeners to take up this psychological and physiological problem. What was the goal of this unusual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Dimitri Gutas, Felicitas Meta Maria Opwis & David Reisman (eds.) (2012). Islamic Philosophy, Science, Culture, and Religion: Studies in Honor of Dimitri Gutas. Brill.score: 81.0
    This collection of essays covers the classical heritage and Islamic culture, classical Arabic science and philosophy, and Muslim religious sciences, showing continuation of Greek and Persian thought as well as original Muslim contributions ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Michael R. Matthews (1994). Science Teaching: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 78.0
    History, Philosophy and Science Teaching argues that science teaching and science teacher education can be improved if teachers know something of the history and philosophy of science and if these topics are included in the science curriculum. The history and philosophy of science have important roles in many of the theoretical issues that science educators need to address: the goals of science education; what constitutes an appropriate science curriculum (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Wenceslao J. González & Jesus Alcolea (eds.) (2006). Contemporary Perspectives in Philosophy and Methodology of Science. Netbiblo.score: 78.0
    Novelty and Continuity in Philosophy and Methodology of Science Wenceslao J. Gonzalez Nowadays, philosophy and methodology of science appear as a ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Tim Crane (2012). Philosophy, Logic, Science, History. Metaphilosophy 43 (1-2):20-37.score: 78.0
    Analytic philosophy is sometimes said to have particularly close connections to logic and to science, and no particularly interesting or close relation to its own history. It is argued here that although the connections to logic and science have been important in the development of analytic philosophy, these connections do not come close to characterizing the nature of analytic philosophy, either as a body of doctrines or as a philosophical method. We will do better to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Steve Fuller (2004). Philosophy, Rhetoric, and the End of Knowledge: A New Beginning for Science and Technology Studies. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.score: 78.0
    This volume explores Science & Technology Studies (STS) and its role in redrawing disciplinary boundaries. For scholars/grad students in rhetoric of science, science studies, philosophy & comm, English, sociology & knowledge mgmt.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. David L. Hull (2001). Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Hull aims to distinguish between those characteristics that are contingent features of selection and those that are essential. Science (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Stephan Hartmann, Luc Bovens & Carl Hoefer (eds.) (2008). Nancy Cartwright's Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 78.0
    Nancy Cartwright is one of the most distinguished and influential contemporary philosophers of science. Despite the profound impact of her work, until now there has not been a systematic exposition of Cartwright's philosophy of science nor a collection of articles that contains in-depth discussions of the major themes of her philosophy. This book is devoted to a critical assessment of Cartwright's philosophy of science and contains contributions from Cartwright's champions and critics. Broken into three (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Marc Lange (ed.) (2007). Philosophy of Science: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub..score: 78.0
    Philosophy of Science: An Anthology assembles some of the finest papers in the philosophy of science since 1945, showcasing enduring classics alongside important and innovative recent work. Introductions by the editor highlight connections between selections, and contextualize the articles Nine sections address topics at the heart of philosophy of science, including realism and the character of scientific theories, scientific explanations and laws of nature, singular casusation, and the metaphysical implications of modern physics Provides an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. F. Stadler, D. Dieks, W. Gonzales, S. Hartmann, T. Uebel & M. Weber (eds.) (2010). The Present Situation in the Philosophy of Science. Springer.score: 78.0
    This volume is a serious attempt to open up the subject of European philosophy of science to real thought, and provide the structural basis for the ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Nancy Cartwright, Stephan Hartmann, Carl Hoefer & Luc Bovens (eds.) (2008). Nancy Cartwright's Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 78.0
    Nancy Cartwright is one of the most distinguished and influential contemporary philosophers of science. Despite the profound impact of her work, until now there has not been a systematic exposition of Cartwright's philosophy of science nor a collection of articles that contains in-depth discussions of the major themes of her philosophy. This book is devoted to a critical assessment of Cartwright's philosophy of science and contains contributions from Cartwright's champions and critics. Broken into three (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Lawrence Sklar (ed.) (2000). The Philosophy of Science: A Collection of Essays. Garland.score: 78.0
    About the Series Contemporary philosophy of science combines a general study from a philosophical perspective of the methods of science, with an inquiry, again from the philosophical point of view, into foundational issues that arise in the various special sciences. Methodological philosophy of science has deep connections with issues at the center of pure philosophy. It makes use of important results, for example, in traditional epistemology, metaphysics and the philosophy of language. It also (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann, Wenceslao Gonzalez, Marcel Weber, Dennis Dieks & Friedrich Stadler (eds.) (2010). The Present Situation in the Philosophy of Science. Springer.score: 78.0
    This volume is a serious attempt to open up the subject of European philosophy of science to real thought, and provide the structural basis for the ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Anthony O'Hear (1989). Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 78.0
    This balanced and up-to-date introduction to the philosophy of science covers all the main topics in the area, and initiates the student into the moral and social reality of science. O'Hear discusses the growth of knowledge of science, the status of scientific theories and their relationship to observational data, the extent to which scientific theories rest on unprovable paradigms, and the nature of scientific explanations. In later chapters he considers probability, scientific reductionism, the relationship between (...) and technology, and the relationship between scientific and other values. (shrink)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Giovanni Boniolo (2007). On Scientific Representations: From Kant to a New Philosophy of Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 78.0
    Scientific concepts, laws, theories, models and thought experiments are representations but uniquely different. In On Scientific Representation each is given a full philosophical exploration within an original, coherent philosophical framework that is strongly rooted in the Kantian tradition (Kant, Hertz, Vaihinger, Cassirer). Through a revisionist historical approach, Boniolo shows how the Kantian tradition can help us renew and rethink contemporary issues in epistemology and the philosophy of science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Alan H. Cromer (1997). Connected Knowledge: Science, Philosophy, and Education. Oxford University Press.score: 78.0
    When physicist Alan Sokal recently submitted an article to the postmodernist journal Social Text, the periodical's editors were happy to publish it--for here was a respected scientist offering support for the journal's view that science is a subjective, socially constructed discipline. But as Sokal himself soon revealed in Lingua Franca magazine, the essay was a spectacular hoax--filled with scientific gibberish anyone with a basic knowledge of physics should have caught--and the academic world suddenly awoke to the vast gap that (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Paul Howard Ellson (2006). The Beautiful Union of Science, Philosophy, and Religion. Aasb Media.score: 78.0
    Humankind : a limited company? -- From volume to point: 1. Philosophy, 2. Religion -- Science : specialised but not special -- Cosmic hierarchies -- Consciousness -- Cognition -- In theory -- Back to Genesis -- The beautiful union.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. William Krieger (ed.) (2011). Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science. Lexington Books.score: 78.0
    Science at the Frontiers brings new voices to the study of the history and philosophy of science. it supplements current literature on these fields, highlighting sciences that are overlooked by the current literature and viewing classic problems in the field from new perspectives.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John Losee (1987). Philosophy of Science and Historical Enquiry. Oxford University Press.score: 78.0
    Philosophy of science and history of science are both interpretations of scientific practice, and the relationship between these two disciplines can take various forms: they may be mutually exclusive, interdependent, or related by inclusion. Much depends on whether philosophy of science is taken to be a prescriptive or a descriptive science. This book is concerned with the nature of the relationship between philosophy of science and history of science, and sheds new (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Edmund Mokrzycki (1983). Philosophy of Science and Sociology: From the Methodological Doctrine to Research Practice. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 78.0
    Originally published in 1983. This book concentrates on the impact of philosophy of science on sociology and other disciplines. It argues that the impact of the philosophy of science on sociology from the rise of the Vienna Circle until the mid-1980s resulted in a deep-reaching and, in the author’s view, undesirable methodological reorientation in sociology.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ryan Nichols, N. D. Smith & Fred Dycus Miller (eds.) (2008). Philosophy Through Science Fiction: A Coursebook with Readings. Routledge.score: 78.0
    Philosophy Through Science Fiction offers a fun, challenging, and accessible way in to the issues of philosophy through the genre of science fiction. Tackling problems such as the possibility of time travel, or what makes someone the same person over time, the authors take a four-pronged approach to each issue, providing a clear and concise introduction to each subject amd a science fiction story that exemplifies a feature of the philosophical discussion ú historical and contemporary (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Deborah A. Redman (1991). Economics and the Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 78.0
    Economists and other social scientists in this century have often supported economic arguments by referring to positions taken by philosophers of science. This important new book looks at the reliability of this practice and, in the process, provides economists, social scientists, and historians with the necessary background to discuss methodological matters with authority. Redman first presents an accurate, critical, yet neutral survey of the modern philosophy of science from the Vienna Circle to the present, focusing particularly on (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Massimo Pigliucci (2013). When Science Studies Religion: Six Philosophy Lessons for Science Classes. Science and Education 22 (1):49-67.score: 75.0
    It is an unfortunate fact of academic life that there is a sharp divide between science and philosophy, with scientists often being openly dismissive of philosophy, and philosophers being equally contemptuous of the naivete ́ of scientists when it comes to the philosophical underpinnings of their own discipline. In this paper I explore the possibility of reducing the distance between the two sides by introducing science students to some interesting philosophical aspects of research in evolutionary biology, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Sharon Crasnow (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Science: 'Standpoint' and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Science and Education 17 (10):1089-1110.score: 75.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Nigel Stepp, Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey (2011). Philosophy for the Rest of Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):425-437.score: 75.0
    Cognitive science has always included multiple methodologies and theoretical commitments. The philosophy of cognitive science should embrace, or at least acknowledge, this diversity. Bechtel’s (2009a) proposed philosophy of cognitive science, however, applies only to representationalist and mechanist cognitive science, ignoring the substantial minority of dynamically oriented cognitive scientists. As an example of nonrepresentational, dynamical cognitive science, we describe strong anticipation as a model for circadian systems (Stepp & Turvey, 2009). We then propose a (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. André Kukla (2000). Social Constructivism and the Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 75.0
    Social constructivists maintain that we invent the properties of the world rather than discover them. Is reality constructed by our own activity? Or, more provocatively, are scientific facts--is everything --constructed? Social Constructivism and the Philosophy of Science is a clear assessment of this critical and increasingly important debate. Andre Kukla presents a comprehensive discussion of the philosophical issues involved and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of a range of constructivist arguments, illustrating the divide between the sociology and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Dachun Liu & Yongmou Liu (2009). A Reflection on the Alternative Philosophy of Science. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):576-588.score: 75.0
    A prominent phenomenon in contemporary philosophy of science has been the unexpected rise of alternative philosophers of science. This article analyses in depth such alternative philosophers of science as Paul Feyerabend, Richard Rorty, and Michel Foucault, summarizing the similarities and differences between alternative philosophies of science and traditional philosophy of science so as to unveil the trends in contemporary philosophy of science. With its different principles and foundation, alternative philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Massimo Pigliucci (2004). What is Philosophy of Science Good For? Philosophy Now 44:45.score: 75.0
    What is the purpose of philosophy of science? Here are some answers.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey (2011). Philosophy for the Rest of Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):425-437.score: 75.0
    Cognitive science has always included multiple methodologies and theoretical commitments. The philosophy of cognitive science should embrace, or at least acknowledge, this diversity. Bechtel's (2009a) proposed philosophy of cognitive science, however, applies only to representationalist and mechanist cognitive science, ignoring the substantial minority of dynamically-oriented cognitive scientists. As an example of non-representational, dynamical cognitive science, we describe strong anticipation as a model for circadian systems (Stepp and Turvey 2009). We then propose a (...) of science appropriate to non-representational, dynamical cognitive science. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Massimo Pigliucci (2008). A Transcendental Philosophy of Science. Philosophy Now 66:48.score: 75.0
    Can there be a transcendental philosophy of science? What would it be good for?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Hylarie Kochiras, Locke's Philosophy of Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 75.0
    This article examines questions connected with the two features of Locke's intellectual landscape that are most salient for understanding his philosophy of science: (1) the profound shift underway in disciplinary boundaries, in methodological approaches to understanding the natural world, and in conceptions of induction and scientific knowledge; and (2) the dominant scientific theory of his day, the corpuscular hypothesis. Following the introduction, section 2 addresses questions connected to changing conceptions of scientific knowledge. What does Locke take science (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Sharon Crasnow (2013). Feminist Philosophy of Science: Values and Objectivity. Philosophy Compass 8 (4):413-423.score: 75.0
    Feminist philosophy of science appears to present problems for the ideal of value-free science. These difficulties also challenge a traditional understanding of the objectivity of science. However, feminist philosophers of science have good reasons for desiring to retain some concept of objectivity. The present essay considers several recent and influential feminist approaches to the role of social and political values in science, with particular focus on feminist empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The similarities and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.score: 75.0
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Tom Sorell (1991). Scientism: Philosophy and the Infatuation with Science. Routledge.score: 75.0
    SCIENTISM AND 'SCIENTIFIC EMPIRICISM' WHAT IS SCIENTISM? Scientism is the belief that science, especially natural science, is much the most valuable part of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000