Search results for 'Philosophy for Childrens' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Maria Miraglia (2014). Philosophy for Children and Territorial Educational Laboratories: A Succeed Experiment. Childhood and Philosophy 9 (18):381-400.score: 116.7
    The article examines the need to increase an education toward the development of complex thinking in urban areas where there is a considerable amount of social unrest. The school often fails to bridge the gap between educator/education and learner and this happens in particular when it comes to kids ‘disadvantaged’. The P4C is a pedagogical method that can heal this divide, inter alia, through its dialogic practice. The practice of philosophy can became a way to bridge the sense of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Marie-France Daniel & Emmanuelle Auriac (2011). Philosophy, Critical Thinking and Philosophy for Children1. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):415-435.score: 103.0
    For centuries, philosophy has been considered as an intellectual activity requiring complex cognitive skills and predispositions related to complex (or critical) thinking. The Philosophy for Children (P4C) approach aims at the development of critical thinking in pupils through philosophical dialogue. Some contest the introduction of P4C in the classroom, suggesting that the discussions it fosters are not philosophical in essence. In this text, we argue that P4C is philosophy.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jennifer Bleazby (2011). Overcoming Relativism and Absolutism: Dewey's Ideals of Truth and Meaning in Philosophy for Children. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):453-466.score: 102.7
    Different notions of truth imply and encourage different ideals of thinking, knowledge, meaning, and learning. Thus, these concepts have fundamental importance for educational theory and practice. In this paper, I intend to draw out and clarify the notions of truth, knowledge and meaning that are implied by P4C's pedagogical ideals. There is some disagreement amongst P4C theorists and practitioners about whether the community of inquiry implies either relativism or absolutism. I will argue that both relativism and absolutism are incompatible with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Sevket Benhur Oral (2013). Can Deweyan Pragmatist Aesthetics Provide a Robust Framework for the Philosophy for Children Programme? Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):361-377.score: 99.7
  5. Jennifer Bleazby (2004). Practicality and Philosophy for Children. Critical and Creative Thinking 12 (2).score: 96.7
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy (eds.) (2011). Philosophy for Children in Transition: Problems and Prospects. John Wiley & Sons.score: 92.3
    The papers present a diverse range of perspectives, problems and tentative prospects concerning the theory and practice of Philosophy for Children today The ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.) (1992). Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Temple University Press.score: 89.3
    In this first part, Matthew Lipman offers the reader a glimpse at the thought processes that resulted in Philosophy for Children and, in so doing, ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lizzy Lewis & Nick Chandley (eds.) (2012). Philosophy for Children Through the Secondary Curriculum. Continuum International Pub. Group.score: 89.3
    Philosophy for Children (P4C) is an approach to learning and teaching that aims to develop reasoning and judgement. Students learn to listen to and respect their peers' opinions, think creatively and work together to develop a deeper understanding of concepts central to their own lives and the subjects they are studying. With the teacher adopting the role of facilitator, a true community develops in which rich and meaningful dialogue results in enquiry of the highest order. Each chapter is written (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Billy Joe Lucas (2012). The Right to Believe Truth Paradoxes of Moral Regret for No Belief and the Role(s) of Logic in Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (2):115-138.score: 84.0
    I offer you some theories of intellectual obligations and rights (virtue Ethics): initially, RBT (a Right to Believe Truth, if something is true it follows one has a right to believe it), and, NDSM (one has no right to believe a contradiction, i.e., No right to commit Doxastic Self-Mutilation). Evidence for both below. Anthropology, Psychology, computer software, Sociology, and the neurosciences prove things about human beliefs, and History, Economics, and comparative law can provide evidence of value about theories of rights. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy (2011). What is Philosophy for Children, What is Philosophy with Children—After Matthew Lipman? Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):171-182.score: 80.3
    Philosophy for Children arose in the 1970s in the US as an educational programme. This programme, initiated by Matthew Lipman, was devoted to exploring the relationship between the notions ‘philosophy’ and ‘childhood’, with the implicit practical goal of establishing philosophy as a full-fledged ‘content area’ in public schools. Over 40 years, the programme has spread worldwide, and the theory and practice of doing philosophy for or with children and young people appears to be of growing interest (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Maughn Gregory (2011). Philosophy for Children and its Critics: A Mendham Dialogue. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):199-219.score: 80.3
    As conceived by founders Matthew Lipman and Ann Margaret Sharp, Philosophy for Children is a humanistic practice with roots in the Hellenistic tradition of philosophy as a way of life given to the search for meaning, in American pragmatism with its emphasis on qualitative experience, collaborative inquiry and democratic society, and in American and Soviet social learning theory. The programme has attracted overlapping and conflicting criticism from religious and social conservatives who don't want children to question traditional values, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Nuran Direk (2006). Philosophy for Children in Turkey. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:17-21.score: 80.3
    In this essay, I shall both inquire into the relationship between democracy and education in general and concentr ate on education in philosophy for children in the Turkish cultural context. I argue that education in philosophy for children is useful for teaching the acquisition of knowledge from the information provided, for questioning of rules in different contexts, and for the analysis of facts encountered in daily life. Ethical attitudes can neither be derived from the information provided about the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Marzena Parzych (2008). Philosophy for Children. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:71-79.score: 80.3
    Philosophy for Children: In the Historical Perspective of the Progressive Nature of Human Consciousness. This paper will examine the importance of the Critical Thinking Movement and the Philosophy for Children Programme in a larger, more inclusive, and innovative perspective. The paper will explain why the CriticalThinking Movement appeared in our time and then offer a new interpretation of the importance of the Philosophy for Children Program – with both seen in a novel historical perspective as well as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Mitsuyo Toyoda (2008). Applying Philosophy for Children to Workshop-Style Environmental Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:101-109.score: 80.3
    This paper examines possible applications of ideas and methods of Philosophy for Children (P4C) to workshop-style environmental education conducted in Sado, Japan. The theme of the workshop is the preservation of toki (the crested ibis) and the local community development. As a result of the success in new breeding, it was determined that the toki, which once became extinct in Japan, would be released to the natural environment in 2008. In order to achieve its successful settlement, local residents are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Dae-Ryun Chung (2008). A Study on Developing Picture Books and Parent-Teacher Manuals for Philosophy for Korean Young Children. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:111-122.score: 79.0
    This paper is a short report about a series of picture books and manuals designed for P4C (especially Philosophy for Korean Young Children). There were not proper educational reading materials or books to help Korean young children to think by (or for) themselves and dialogue with. Dr. Sharp’s is a very helpful guidebook for young children to think by themselves, dialogue with friends, and discuss with others (peers, older or younger children, teacher and parents, etc.). However, there (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Yong-Sock Chang & Ji–Young Kim (2008). Visual Culture Education Through the Philosophy for Children Program. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:27-34.score: 78.7
    The appearance of mass media and a versatile medium of videos can serve the convenience and instructive information for children; on the other hand, it could abet them in implicit image consumption. Now is the time for kids' to be in need of thinking power which enables them to make a choice, applications andcriticism of information within such visual cultures. In spite of these social changes, the realities are that our curriculum still doesn't meet a learner's demand properly. This research, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nicholas Maxwell (2005). Philosophy Seminars for Five-Year-Olds,. Learning for Democracy 1 (2):71-77.score: 77.7
    We need a revolution in education, from five year olds onwards, so that exploration of problems is at the heart of the enterprise.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. M. Lipman (1992). Integrating Cognitive Skills and Conceptual Contents in Teaching the Philosophy for Children Curriculum. In Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.), Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Temple University Press. 10--12.score: 77.3
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ann Margaret Sharp (1992). Women, Children and the Evolution of Philosophy for Children. In Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.), Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Temple University Press.score: 77.3
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Young-Sam Chun (2008). Teaching Philosophy as a Tool for Helping Children Understand Problems Properly. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:23-28.score: 73.3
    Children are surrounded by a lot of problems here and there, and they often show any tendency to answer them promptly. In this paper, I argue that helping children understand their problems properly before answering them is one of the good ways of meta-thinking teaching in philosophy for children, and then I suggest how teachers help them do so.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. William J. Rapaport (1987). Philosophy for Children and Other People. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy (Summer):19-22.score: 73.0
    It is a matter of fact—and has been so for a considerable amount of time—that philosophy is taught at the pre—college level. However, to teach philosophy at that (or at any) level is one thing; to teach it well is quite another. Fortunately, it can be taught well, as a host of successful experiences and programs have shown. But in what ways can it be taught? Are there differences in the ways in which it can or should be (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Daniela G. Camhy (ed.) (1994). Children, Thinking, and Philosophy: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of Philosophy for Children, Graz, 1992 = Das Philosophische Denken Von Kindern: Kongressband des 5. Internationalen Kongresses für Kinderphilosophie, Graz, 1992. [REVIEW] Academia Verlag.score: 70.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Berys Nigel Gaut (2012). Philosophy for Young Children: A Practical Guide. Routledge.score: 69.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Michael S. Pritchard (2000). Moral Philosophy for Children and Character Education. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):13-26.score: 67.0
    This paper discusses the growing prominence of character education and the role moral philosophy can play here. It examines the place of inquiry in character education, and the ways in which moral philosophy can help young people to develop the virtue of reasonableness. Reasonableness, as herein described, takes into account the views and feelings of others, the willingness to allow one’s views to be scrutinized by others, and the acceptance of some degree of uncertainty about whether one’s views (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Nicholas Maxwell (2002). The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (2):381-408.score: 66.0
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the direction of simplicity, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gang Liu (2007). Philosophy of Information and Foundation for the Future Chinese Philosophy of Science and Technology. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):95-114.score: 66.0
    The research programme of the philosophy of information (PI) proposed in 2002 made it an independent area or discipline in philosophical research. The scientific concept of ‘information’ is formally accepted in philosophical inquiry. Hence a new and tool-driven philosophical discipline of PI with its interdisciplinary nature has been established. Philosophy of information is an ‘orientative’ rather than ‘cognitive’ philosophy. When PI is under consideration in the history of Western philosophy, it can be regarded as a shift (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Cesar Catalani & Patrícia del Nero Velasco (2009). On the Logic of the Program of Philosophy for Children. Childhood and Philosophy 10:283-316.score: 64.0
    This article aims to present part of the results from the Scientific Initiation research entitled Logical Foundations of Education for Thinking. Specifically, the exposed contents are the logical ones developed by Matthew Lipman in his philosophical novel Harry Stottlemeier�s discovery. The text is divided in three main sections: formal logic, logic of good reasons and logic of rationally acting. In the first one, we map the contents of formal logic present in that novel. In this context, we studied Aristotelian logic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. J. P. Portelli & S. Church (1995). Whole Language and Philosophy for Children. In John Peter Portelli & Ronald F. Reed (eds.), Children, Philosophy, and Democracy. Detselig Enterprises.score: 64.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Liu Gang (2007). Philosophy of Information and Foundation for the Future Chinese Philosophy of Science and Technology. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):95-114.score: 63.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Greg Littmann (2014). Writing Philosophy for the Public is a Moral Obligation. Essays in Philosophy 15 (1):103-116.score: 63.0
    Writing philosophy to be read by people who are not professional philosophers ought to be central to the work of professional philosophers. Writing for the public should be central to their work because their professional end is to produce ideas for use by people who are not professional philosophers. Philosophy is unlike most disciplines in that the ideas produced by professional philosophers generally have to be understood by a person before they can be of any use to them. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Gilbert Burgh & Kim Nichols (2012). The Parallels Between Philosophical Inquiry and Scientific Inquiry: Implications for Science Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1045-1059.score: 62.7
    The ‘community of inquiry’ as formulated by C. S. Peirce is grounded in the notion of communities of discipline-based inquiry engaged in the construction of knowledge. The phrase ‘transforming the classroom into a community of inquiry’ is commonly understood as a pedagogical activity with a philosophical focus to guide classroom discussion. But it has a broader application. Integral to the method of the community of inquiry is the ability of the classroom teacher to actively engage in the theories and practices (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Diogenes Allen & Eric O. Springsted (eds.) (1992). Primary Readings in Philosophy for Understanding Theology. Westminster/John Knox Press.score: 62.0
    This new anthology provides primary texts undergirding Diogenes Allen's earlier work, Philosophy for Understanding Theology, making for a valuable theological ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Siobhan Chapman (2000). Philosophy for Linguists: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 62.0
    Philosophy for Linguists provides students with a clear, concise introduction to the main topics in the philosophy of language. Focusing on what linguists need to know and how philosophy relates to modern linguistics, the book is structured around key branches of linguistics: semantics, pragmatics, and language acquisition. Assuming no prior knowledge of philosophy, Siobhan Chapman traces the history and development of ideas in the philosophy of language and outlines the contributions of specific philosophers. The book (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael Hauskeller (2011). No Philosophy for Swine: John Stuart Mill on the Quality of Pleasures. Utilitas 23 (04):428-446.score: 62.0
    I argue that Mill introduced the distinction between quality and quantity of pleasures in order to fend off the then common charge that utilitarianism is ‘a philosophy for swine’ and to accommodate the (still) widespread intuition that the life of a human is better, in the sense of being intrinsically more valuable, than the life of an animal. I argue that in this he fails because in order to do successfully he would have to show not only that the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. William C. Wimsatt (2007). Re-Engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings: Piecewise Approximations to Reality. Harvard University Press.score: 62.0
    This book offers a philosophy for error-prone humans trying to understand messy systems in the real world.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Michael Lacewing (2009). Philosophy for A2: Unit 4. Routledge.score: 62.0
    Philosophy for AS is the definitive textbook for students of the current AQA Advanced Subsidiary Level. Structured closely around the examination specifications, it covers the two units of the AS Level in an exceptionally clear and student-friendly style. As an invitation to philosophy, the book encourages and enables students to engage philosophically with the following syllabus topics: reason and experience Why should I be governed? Why should I be moral? the idea of God persons knowledge of the external (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Michael Lacewing (2009). Philosophy for A2: Unit 3. Routledge.score: 62.0
    Philosophy for AS is the definitive textbook for students of the current AQA Advanced Subsidiary Level. Structured closely around the examination specifications, it covers the two units of the AS Level in an exceptionally clear and student-friendly style. As an invitation to philosophy, the book encourages and enables students to engage philosophically with the following syllabus topics: reason and experience Why should I be governed? Why should I be moral? the idea of God persons knowledge of the external (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.) (2004). Philosophy for as and A. Routledge.score: 62.0
    Philosophy for AS and A2 is the definitive textbook for students of Advanced Subsidiary or Advanced Level courses, structured directly around the specification of the AQA - the only exam board to offer these courses. Following a lively foreword by Nigel Warburton, author of Philosophy: The Basics , a team of experienced teachers devote a chapter each to the six themes covered by the syllabus: AS * Theory of Knowledge * Moral Philosophy * Philosophy of Religion (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Nathan Kowalsky (ed.) (2010). Hunting--Philosophy for Everyone in Search of the Wild Life. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 62.0
    Hunting---Philosophy for Everyone Presents a thought-provoking collection of new essays from across the academic and non-academic spectrum that move far beyound ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Dave Monroe (ed.) (2010). Porn - Philosophy for Everyone: How to Think with Kink. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 62.0
    Entertaining and scholarly, "Porn - Philosophy for Everyone" offers a titillating, tantalizing glimpse into the world of porn.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Lon Nease & Michael W. Austin (eds.) (2010). Fatherhood - Philosophy for Everyone: The Dao of Daddy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 62.0
    Fatherhood - Philosophy for Everyone offers fathers wisdom and practical advice drawn from the annals of philosophy. Both thought-provoking and humorous, it provides a valuable starting and ending point for reflecting on this crucial role.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David M. Steffes (2007). Panpsychic Organicism: Sewall Wright's Philosophy for Understanding Complex Genetic Systems. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (2):327 - 361.score: 62.0
    Sewall Wright first encountered the complex systems characteristic of gene combinations while a graduate student at Harvard's Bussey Institute from 1912 to 1915. In Mendelian breeding experiments, Wright observed a hierarchical dependence of the organism's phenotype on dynamic networks of genetic interaction and organization. An animal's physical traits, and thus its autonomy from surrounding environmental constraints, depended greatly on how genes behaved in certain combinations. Wright recognized that while genes are the material determinants of the animal phenotype, operating with great (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Steven M. Cahn & Delia Graff Fara (eds.) (2003). Philosophy for the 21st Century: A Comprehensive Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 62.0
    Philosophy for the 21st Century, an introductory anthology, is an extraordinarily comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary readings. It covers all major fields, including not only metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of religion, but also philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, political philosophy, and philosophy of art. This volume is unique in drawing on the judgments of a new generation of scholars, each of whom has chosen the articles and provided (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sánchez Flores & Mónica Judith (2005). Political Philosophy for the Global Age. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 62.0
    In a time of globalization, Political Philosophy for the Global Age provides a theoretical basis for the convergence of human values in terms of legitimate conceptions of time, language, and notions of self. Sánchez Flores reviews what she considers to be the most important positions in the current debate on political theory (liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and postcolonialism) and also proposes her own original contribution. Sánchez Flores’s unique approach is a critique of a type of morality formulated solely on the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Richard Osborne (1992/2007). Philosophy for Beginners. For Beginners Llc..score: 62.0
    Why does philosophy give some people a headache, others a real buzz, and yet others a feeling that it is subversive and dangerous? Why do a lot of people think philosophy is totally irrelevant? What is philosophy anyway? The ABCs of philosophy??—easy to understand but never simplistic. Beginning with basic questions posed by the ancient Greeks - What is knowledge? What is good and evil? Philosophy For Beginners traces the answers given by western philosophy (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jim Powell (2000/2007). Eastern Philosophy for Beginners. For Beginners Llc..score: 62.0
    The spiritual rewards and intellectual challenges of Eastern philosophy are revealed in this visually stunning book, illustrated by Joe Lee and with 19th-century engravings. Eastern philosophy is not only an intellectual pursuit, but one that involves one’s entire being. Much of it is so deeply entwined with the non-intellectual art of meditation, that the two are impossible to separate. In this survey of the major philosophies of India, China, Tibet and Japan, Jim Powell draws upon his knowledge of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Howard Richards (1992/1996). Letters From Quebec: A Philosophy for Peace and Justice. International Scholars Publications.score: 62.0
    v. 1. Philosophy for peace and justice -- v. 2. Methods for transforming the structures of the modern world.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Mónica Judith Sánchez-Flores (2005). Political Philosophy for the Global Age. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 62.0
    In a time of globalization, Political Philosophy for the Global Age provides a theoretical basis for the convergence of human values in terms of legitimate conceptions of time, language, and notions of self. Sánchez Flores reviews what she considers to be the most important positions in the current debate on political theory (liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and postcolonialism) and also proposes her own original contribution. Sánchez Flores’s unique approach is a critique of a type of morality formulated solely on the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Constantine Sandis (2004). Philosophy for Younger People: A Polemic. Philosophical Pathways.score: 61.3
    Recent years have seen a high increase in the teaching of Philosophy in schools. Programs such as Pathways Schools in Australia International Society for Philosophers, since 2003), 'Philosophy in Schools' in the UK (Royal Institute of Philosophy, since 1999), and 'Philosophy for Children' in the USA, Australia, and the UK (International Council for Philosophical Inquiry since 1985 & Society for Advancing Philosophical Enquiry and Reflection in Education since 1993) are spreading around the world. Within a decade (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Nancy Vansieleghem (2005). Philosophy for Children as the Wind of Thinking. Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):19–35.score: 61.0
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000